how do I eat on GAPS

Swedish Gravlax Recipe

This meal is adapted from GAPS Cookbook by Dr. Natasha Campbell

This is a brined fish meal legal on GAPS stage 2. You eat little pieces, one small piece a day.

Swedish Gravlax Recipe

Ingredients for Swedish Gravlax:

  • ½ lb Fresh Wild Caught Salmon

  • Fresh Dill

  • Freshly Coarsely Ground Black Pepper

  • 4 cup Room Temperature Filtered Water

  • 1 tbsp Honey

  • 1 ½ tbsp Salt

Directions for Swedish Gravlax:

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Thinly slice the fish.

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Place fish slices into a deep tray.

Sprinkle with dill sprigs and pepper.

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Dissolve honey and salt in water to make a brine.

Pour brine over fish.

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Leave at room temperature for 1 - 1 ½ hours.

Pour the water out.

Serve on lettuce or eat alone.

Store in refrigerator and consume within two days.


Swedish Gravlax Recipe

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ lb Fresh Wild Caught Salmon
  • Fresh Dill
  • Freshly Coarsely Ground Black Pepper
  • 4 cup Room Temperature Filtered Water
  • 1 tbsp Honey
  • 1 ½ tbsp Salt

instructions:

How to cook Swedish Gravlax Recipe

  1. Thinly slice the fish.
  2. Place fish slices into a deep tray.
  3. Sprinkle with dill sprigs and pepper.
  4. Dissolve honey and salt in water to make a brine.
  5. Pour brine over fish.
  6. Leave at room temperature for 1 - 1 ½ hours.
  7. Pour the water out.
  8. Serve on lettuce or eat alone.
  9. Store in refrigerator and consume within two days.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Citrus and Chocolate Fudge Made with Coconut

GAPS Legal Chocolate Peppermint Coconut Fudge and Citrus Coconut Fudge

The GAPS Legal Fudge is a delicious holiday recipe and easy to share with family and friends! This recipe comes together quickly, besides the melting of the coconut butter and oil. I like making this recipe on a snowy day because it’s fun to chill the pans in a snowbank! It makes me feel like a pioneer.

For the citrus fudge, you can use any citrus you like. I prefer orange. You can also use all shredded coconut if you like. I prefer a little crunch in my fudge and like to add the flakes.You can make these flavors on their own and keep them separate. However, I prefer the two flavors together.

To combine the flavors, make the chocolate peppermint fudge first and put it in the freezer for 10 minutes to chill rapidly while you make the citrus fudge. Once chilled, pour the citrus fudge over the top and chill again.The fudge keeps for quite a while and doesn’t melt easily at room temperature. Even so, storing in the fridge is best.Enjoy!

Chocolate Peppermint Coconut Fudge

Ingredients for chocolate peppermint coconut fudge

  • ½ cup coconut butter

  • ½ cup coconut oil

  • ½ cup cocoa powder

  • ½ cup honey

  • 2 tsp peppermint extract or 2 drops peppermint oil

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut

  • ¼ cup coconut flakes

Directions for chocolate peppermint coconut fudge

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Melt coconut butter on medium heat by adding water to the bottom of a pot and placing jar on top. Or add jar and water to crockpot and heat for two hours until melted.

Melt coconut oil in a separate pot. Crush coconut flakes into smaller pieces.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Combine coconut butter, coconut oil, cocoa powder, honey, peppermint, vanilla, shredded coconut and coconut flakes into a food processor.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Spread mixture into a pan.Chill for 30 minutes.

Add hot water to the sink. Float pan in mixture approx 1 minute until mixture releases from sides. Dip a knife in hot water then slice fudge into pieces.

How to Make Citrus coconut Fudge

Ingredients for citrus coconut fudge

  • ½ cup coconut butter

  • ½ cup coconut oil

  • ⅓ cup raw honey

  • 1 tbsp citrus zest

  • 2 tbs citrus juice

  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut

  • ¼ cup Coconut Flakes

Directions for citrus coconut fudge

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Melt coconut butter on medium heat by adding water to the bottom of a pot and placing jar on top. Or add jar and water to crockpot and heat for two hours until melted. Melt coconut oil in a separate pot.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Combine coconut butter, coconut oil, cocoa powder, honey, peppermint, and vanilla into a food processor.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Spread mixture into a pan.Chill for 30 minutes.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Add hot water to the sink. Float pan in mixture approx 1 minute until mixture releases from sides. Dip a knife in hot water then slice fudge into pieces.


Chocolate Peppermint Fudge

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ cup coconut butter
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • ½ cup cocoa powder
  • ½ cup honey
  • 2 tsp peppermint extract or 2 drops peppermint oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut
  • ¼ cup coconut flakes

instructions:

How to cook Chocolate Peppermint Fudge

  1. Melt coconut butter on medium heat by adding water to the bottom of a pot and placing jar on top. Or add jar and water to crockpot and heat for two hours until melted.
  2. Melt coconut oil in a separate pot. Crush coconut flakes into smaller pieces.
  3. Combine coconut butter, coconut oil, cocoa powder, honey, peppermint, vanilla, shredded coconut and coconut flakes into a food processor.
  4. Spread mixture into a pan.Chill for 30 minutes.
  5. Add hot water to the sink. Float pan in mixture approx 1 minute until mixture releases from sides. Dip a knife in hot water then slice fudge into pieces.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Citrus Coconut Fudge

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ cup coconut butter
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • ⅓ cup raw honey
  • 1 tbsp citrus zest
  • 2 tbs citrus juice
  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut
  • ¼ cup Coconut Flakes

instructions:

How to cook Citrus Coconut Fudge

  1. Melt coconut butter on medium heat by adding water to the bottom of a pot and placing jar on top. Or add jar and water to crockpot and heat for two hours until melted. Melt coconut oil in a separate pot.
  2. Combine coconut butter, coconut oil, cocoa powder, honey, peppermint, and vanilla into a food processor.
  3. Spread mixture into a pan. Chill for 30 minutes.
  4. Add hot water to the sink. Float pan in mixture approx 1 minute until mixture releases from sides. Dip a knife in hot water then slice fudge into pieces.
Created using The Recipes Generator

GAPS Legal Zucchini Pizza Bites

Recently I needed a bit of a change. I needed something exciting to eat! And I really wanted pizza. But even though I know how to make a GAPS legal pizza crust I did not want to spend the time or energy to make it. Then I came up with this brilliant idea... pizza bites... on zucchini! and what's better? They are stage 4 (and beyond) GAPS legal!

I happened to have just bought some good-quality uncured pepperoni at the store, and had some sauce in the cabinet (although if I don't happen to have that I just as easily throw a couple tomatoes in a blender and make my own sauce on the stove). I tried it, and it worked! Delicious pizza bites that really taste like pizza (with zucchini on it) and can be made to suit any taste or dietary guidelines.

Unless you can't eat zucchini, you should be able to modify this for anyone. The fat used can be anything. You could leave off the tomato sauce, or make a while sauce. You can top with anything you can tolerate. Most people can tolerate raw cheese by the time they get to full GAPS And I guarantee that even if you can't do pepperoni, there is some type of meat you can have! Part of what makes a pizza is cheese and tomato sauce, so without these you will have a little different taste, but that doesn't mean you won't have something delicious!

Ingredients for gaps friendly pizza made with zucchini:

  • Zucchini

  • 2 TBS Lard, Butter or Other Fat

  • Italian Seasonings

  • Salt & Pepper

  • Pizza Sauce (make your own or buy a sugar free version in a glass jar)

  • Mozzarella Cheese

  • Uncured Pepperoni

  • Other Pizza Toppings of Your Choice

Directions for gaps friendly pizza made with zucchini:

GAPS Legal pizza is a thing! These pizza bites are gluten free because they’re made with zucchini. Zucchini pizza bites are GAPS legal past stage four and are a great summer recipe on what to do with too much zucchini. GAPS Friendly pizza made with zucchini recipe by holistic healthcare provider and certified GAPS provider Amy Mihaly.

Sliced the zucchini into rounds, approx ¼ thick. Don’t slice too thin!

Add your preferred fat to a pan on medium heat. Once hot, add zucchini slices. Your zucchini should not be swimming in the fat!

GAPS Legal pizza is a thing! These pizza bites are gluten free because they’re made with zucchini. Zucchini pizza bites are GAPS legal past stage four and are a great summer recipe on what to do with too much zucchini. GAPS Friendly pizza made with zucchini recipe by holistic healthcare provider and certified GAPS provider Amy Mihaly.

Sprinkle zucchini slices with salt, pepper and Italian seasonings.

Grate the mozzarella cheese.

GAPS Legal pizza is a thing! These pizza bites are gluten free because they’re made with zucchini. Zucchini pizza bites are GAPS legal past stage four and are a great summer recipe on what to do with too much zucchini. GAPS Friendly pizza made with zucchini recipe by holistic healthcare provider and certified GAPS provider Amy Mihaly.

Once the zucchini slices are golden brown (8-10 min), flip them to the other side.

GAPS Legal pizza is a thing! These pizza bites are gluten free because they’re made with zucchini. Zucchini pizza bites are GAPS legal past stage four and are a great summer recipe on what to do with too much zucchini. GAPS Friendly pizza made with zucchini recipe by holistic healthcare provider and certified GAPS provider Amy Mihaly.

Spoon tomato sauce on top of each zucchini slice. Top with uncured pepperoni or other toppings of your choice and add grated mozzarella cheese. Cover for 2 - 3 minutes so the cheese melts.

GAPS Legal pizza is a thing! These pizza bites are gluten free because they’re made with zucchini. Zucchini pizza bites are GAPS legal past stage four and are a great summer recipe on what to do with too much zucchini. GAPS Friendly pizza made with zucchini recipe by holistic healthcare provider and certified GAPS provider Amy Mihaly.

Once the cheese is melted, your zucchini pizzas are done!

Other toppings you could try would be artichoke hearts, olives. anchovies, or cooked chicken pieces. (Think your favorite pizza toppings!) Enjoy! Careful, they are hot! Once they have cooled a little, you can cut them into fourths to be served to those with small mouths. And as any good pizza is, they are delicious cold as well!  

What are your favorite toppings? Did you find good combinations? Let us know!


Zucchini Pizza Bites

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • Zucchini
  • 2 TBS Lard, Butter or Other Fat
  • Italian Seasonings
  • Salt & Pepper
  • Pizza Sauce (make your own or buy a sugar free version in a glass jar)
  • Mozzarella Cheese
  • Uncured Pepperoni
  • Other Pizza Toppings of Your Choice

instructions:

How to cook Zucchini Pizza Bites

  1. Sliced the zucchini into rounds, approx ¼ thick. Don’t slice too thin!
  2. Add your preferred fat to a pan on medium heat. Once hot, add zucchini slices. Your zucchini should not be swimming in the fat!
  3. Sprinkle zucchini slices with salt, pepper and Italian seasonings.
  4. Grate the mozzarella cheese.
  5. Once the zucchini slices are golden brown (8-10 min), flip them to the other side.
  6. Spoon tomato sauce on top of each zucchini slice. Top with uncured pepperoni or other toppings of your choice and add grated mozzarella cheese. Cover for 2 - 3 minutes so the cheese melts.
  7. Once the cheese is melted, your zucchini pizzas are done!
  8. Other toppings you could try would be artichoke hearts, olives. anchovies, or cooked chicken pieces. (Think your favorite pizza toppings!) Enjoy! Careful, they are hot! Once they have cooled a little, you can cut them into fourths to be served to those with small mouths. And as any good pizza is, they are delicious cold as well!
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GAPS Friendly Marshmallow Recipe

What if I told you that you could have a treat that is GAPS legal AND is good for you??? The GAPS marshmallow does just that. This simple treat is basically made up of gelatin, honey, water and optional vanilla. You can use this treat to get extra gelatin if you are needing that. Just reduce the amount of honey*. And they are simple to make!

GAPS Friendly MARSHMALLOWS Ingredients

  • 2 cups honey

  • 1 cup of filtered water

  • 2 tsp vanilla (optional)

  • 1/2 tsp sea salt

  • 6 TBS grass-fed beef gelatin

  • 1 cup of filtered water

Directions for making your own marshmallows

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Soften the Gelatin by adding gelatin to 1 cup of hot water. Stir and allow to sit. Keep it warm but not on the stove.

While gelatin is softening… Heat honey and water in a medium saucepan (medium to high heat), stirring frequently, until it reaches the soft ball candy stage (about 235°F).

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If you don’t have a thermometer, you can check by dripping the heated honey into a glass of cold water. When the candy forms a ball, it is ready!

When the honey has reached the soft ball stage, remove from heat.

Add the heated honey mixture to the softened gelatin in a large bowl.

Add vanilla (optional)

Do these steps quickly, you don’t want honey mixture to cool off too much!

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Whisk the mixture using an electric mixer or stand mixer for about 10 minutes. When the mixture is thick and looks like marshmallow paste, it’s done!

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Put the marshmallow paste in a greased and parchment paper-lined glass 9x11 dish and allow to cool and dry for 24-36 hrs. Then cut up and serve.

These marshmallows won't have exactly the same consistency (and won't roast over the fire quite the same) as store-bought marshmallows, but you can roast them for things like s'mores, and they are delicious! You can also use them to top roasted sweet potatoes or butternut squash or to top your homemade ice cream for a sundae or banana split.

Enjoy!

*As a general rule I don't like to heat honey, as some research has shown that heating it can turn the honey toxic. On the other hand, these marshmallows are a whole lot better than commercially available marshmallows, so I think as a treat they are great! I still recommend using raw honey for these recipes, you will be heating it much less than most non-raw honey is heated.


Homemade Marshmallows

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 cups honey
  • 1 cup of filtered water
  • 2 tsp vanilla (optional)
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 6 TBS grass-fed beef gelatin
  • 1 cup of filtered water

instructions:

How to cook Homemade Marshmallows

  1. Soften the Gelatin by adding gelatin to 1 cup of hot water. Stir and allow to sit. Keep it warm but not on the stove.
  2. While gelatin is softening… Heat honey and water in a medium saucepan (medium to high heat), stirring frequently, until it reaches the soft ball candy stage (about 235°F).
  3. If you don’t have a thermometer, you can check by dripping the heated honey into a glass of cold water. When the candy forms a ball, it is ready!
  4. When the honey has reached the soft ball stage, remove from heat.
  5. Add the heated honey mixture to the softened gelatin in a large bowl.
  6. Add vanilla (optional)
  7. Do these steps quickly, you don’t want honey mixture to cool off too much!
  8. Whisk the mixture using an electric mixer or stand mixer for about 10 minutes. When the mixture is thick and looks like marshmallow paste, it’s done!
  9. Put the marshmallow paste in a greased and parchment paper-lined glass 9x11 dish and allow to cool and dry for 24-36 hrs. Then cut up and serve.
  10. These marshmallows won't have exactly the same consistency (and won't roast over the fire quite the same) as store-bought marshmallows, but you can roast them for things like s'mores, and they are delicious! You can also use them to top roasted sweet potatoes or butternut squash or to top your homemade ice cream for a sundae or banana split.
Created using The Recipes Generator

How To Travel On the GAPS Diet

Traveling while following the GAPS diet can be challenging. But with the right preparation and choices, it can be possible. Before we talk about specific ideas, let’s talk about the top 3 things that are variables in how you prepare for traveling on GAPS.

Mode of Transportation

When planning what to do, you must first consider what mode or modes of transportation you are taking. Travel by car, bus, train, airplane, or international flight all come with their own difficulties. When you are traveling by car you can pack foods in a cooler, and there is more room for things like hot plates, pots and pans. Air travel can come with limitations on liquids and space, and international travel may have even further limitations. And traveling by bus or train may not bring liquid restrictions, but the items you bring will still be limited by baggage space.

Length of the Trip

The second consideration is the length of the trip. You may be able to omit certain foods like ferments or meat stock if you are gone only a few days, but longer trips would necessitate the need to bring these essentials. On the other hand, a longer trip would give you the opportunity to go to the store, purchase and prepare these essential foods, when there isn’t necessarily enough enough time to do this on a shorter trip.

Your GAPS Stage

Finally, think about what stage you are on, and assess where you are in relation to your health. For example, traveling on Intro stage 1 is very different from traveling on Full GAPS. It’s also important to bring into the calculation how strongly your body is currently reacting if you eat things off your current stage. People on earlier stages and with stronger reactions will have to be more careful and likely need to bring and/or prepare all of the food they eat while traveling.

Great! Now you have thought through the specifics of your trip, now let’s look some options for the foods themselves. The GAPS protocol is, by necessity, intricate and encompassing to make sure that we are supporting your body as well as possible during healing. But during times like travel, there are a few essentials that are most important to continue doing daily, while other (equally important) habits can be skipped for a few days.

What are the essentials to GAPS?

Meat stock, fat and ferments!

So let’s talk about these three.

Meat Stock

Bringing meat stock can seem almost impossible when traveling, especially if you are traveling by plane. And if you are in a stage where you can be without, it is okay to miss this for a day or two. But if your trip gets much longer than that, or if you are traveling while on an early Intro stage, then you need to find a way to have meat stock on your trip.

The two issues with meat stock are space and liquid. You can reduce the space the meat stock takes up by boiling your stock down to a concentrate or even dried bullion that an be reconstituted later. Simply make your stock (chicken is easiest for this), then when it’s done remove the solids and put the liquid back on the stove. Simmer it with the lid off until it is reduced in volume. At this point you can freeze it in snack-pack bags or ice-cube trays.

To further reduce it (and eliminate the liquid problem altogether), you can put it on fruit leather dehydrator trays and remove the rest of the liquid via dehydration. This “meat leather” can be broken into strips and the pieces added to water, or it can be pulverized into bullion powder.

Another option may be to make meat stock where you are going. If you are staying in a house all you need is a quick stop at the store to pick up supplies and you are on your way. But if you are staying at a hotel there are still some options. If you have the space to bring a small hot plate and medium saucepan, you can make stock in small batches in your hotel room. Or you can use and electric kettle or the coffee maker to warm up hot water to reconstitute your “meat leather” or bullion, or use hot water from the hotel lobby or coffee shop.

Fat

Animal fat is so important, especially with the increased and different stressors you will be exposed to during travel. It’s important to continue getting good quality fat.

Freezing your fat in single portion sizes, then traveling with it in a soft cooler (or better yet, checked luggage) is almost always successful even when traveling by air. Then don’t forget to eat it! Bring it with you through your day so you can add it to your meal, or eat it straight or with snack foods like dried fruit.

Traveling home with it may be more tricky, so make sure to have some at home ready to greet you when you return!

Ferments

Getting regular doses of probiotics during your trip is also essential, especially when exposed to unfamiliar foods and microbes. Some people may find that taking a powdered or encapsulated probiotic is sufficient. But others may be depending on that probiotic for stomach acid to digest food and release bile.

If this is the case, many people can get by with eating only the fermented vegetable (no liquid) of their favorite ferment. This shouldn’t get flagged by the TSA. Simply strain the ferment for several hours, letting the juice run into a jar (save for later). Then double-bag the vegetables for easy packing.

If you need that liquid ferment, you will probably have to put it in your checked luggage. I recommend a container that seals well, with plenty of air room, and many bags protecting your clothing! Or you may be able to connect with someone at your destination who can make a ferment for you so it’s ready when you arrive.

A Few Final Notes

Most restaurants will have no problem with you bringing in an addition to their food (like ferments or fat). In fact, if you add it to your dish after you are served, it may go completely unnoticed by anyone even at the table.

Most hotels have a refrigerator available for guest use, even if there isn’t one in your room. If you don’t see one, ask!

International flights may have different rules about what can come into their country, but it seems that for most, as long as it is only a small amount of prepared food for personal use, there isn’t a problem.

And finally, there is a phenomenon that occurs for many people while they travel. The body understands that you are in a different place, and in many cases it can put the current healing mode on hold. This means you may be able to eat more foods with fewer problems than you do at home. This is common, but it does not mean that you are necessarily ready to continue those foods upon your return. In fact, you may find that you need to be even more strict, or drop to a earlier stage for a few days to get your body back to where it was. But if this happens, it usually happens after you return, not during travel. Other people can avoid this dip but being sure to return back to the stage they were on immediately after getting home.

A note on detoxing: While we discussed only food in this post, detoxing is important to continue, and may be even more essential in an environment that is polluted with EMFs and environmental toxins, as well as unfamiliar and potentially unknown foods. I recommend traveling with a bath dechlorinator (I use this one) and a zipper-sealed bag of Epsom salts for detox baths. Additionally, take opportunities to sunbathe and ground, even if just for a few minutes.

Disclosure: Contains an affiliate link, which helps support my blogging. Your trust is important to me, and I only recommend resources I trust.

Real Food: More Than the Sum of Its Parts

Every time I learn more about the complex interactions between the human body and different nutrients, bacteria, and dozens of other factors, I am blown away! Not sure what I mean? As an example, this was mentioned in my latest post. A seed has enough intelligence to protect itself from being digested, but then is able to release those protections when the conditions are right to grow! All while it's still a seed! And that complicated process relates only to the seed. We haven’t even begun to explore the combining of that seed with some other food, or in a different form, or after the seed grows up. Not to mention the effect stomach acid levels, digestive enzyme activity, and different gut flora have on that seed. And the list goes on and on. Therefore we see that our bodies, and the processes that happen inside them, are incredibly intricate. And it begs the question:

Are vitamins, or carb/protein ratios really what it’s all about?

Eating real food is more than eating food-shaped packages of vitamins, proteins, and fibers. Real food is dynamic, and what you get from a particular food is conditional, and depends on several factors.

Growing Conditions: The actual nutritional value of that particular piece of food depends on the conditions it was grown in, including sun exposure, water quality, and the amount of vitamins, minerals and healthy bacteria in the soil or food the animal was eating.

Preparation Methods: After it is grown, different ways of preparing food will make it more or less digestible; helpful, stressful, or even harmful to the human body.

Individual Body Status: Even if it’s prepared properly, each individual body's environment has a role in determining the amount of benefit or harm that food will have.

In fact, a food's helpfulness to an individual body is dependent on the season, metabolic needs, current hormone state, and a myriad of other factors that are going on in the body at that moment. So what's helpful to your body in the summer may be harmful in winter. Or what's beneficial to eat at noon may weigh your body down at dinnertime. Every minute your metabolic needs may be different.

This is why "eating healthy" cannot be reduced to fortifying processed foods with vitamins, or taking the "perfect" supplement mix. It is so, so much more! Now that you know all this, eating healthy may sound like an unattainable goal. And in some ways it is. Even if we are extremely in tune with our bodies, it is unlikely that we will think “I need 5.78 mcg of calcium and 4.24 mg of vitamin D at 2:57pm”… and so on. And this is my first point.

There is no magic pill or secret supplement!

Even if the advertised effects are real, it doesn’t mean that it will work for you! Your body may need something else entirely. If anyone tells you that they have the one product that will fix all your ills, run the other way! On the other hand, the innateintelligence inside our bodies does know what it needs, and how to get it. We can work on listening to what our bodies are telling us. I call this becoming an expert detective (for more, see chapter 7 of Notes From A GAPS Practitioner).

As we renew the partnership with our body, we will begin to understand its signals about what foods will best support our bodies at that moment. Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride talks about this in a wonderful article, One Man’s Meat is Another Man’s Poison. In it she shares how important it is to listen to your body telling you what food to eat at the moment, and how much of it to eat. Becoming an expert detective does not happen overnight. It is a commitment to observe, experiment, create theories, and modify them as needed. It will get easier with time and experience, and every time you learn something, your health will benefit. And you will have taken one more step in your journey toward better health.

Onward!  

Disclosure: Contains an affiliate link, which helps support my blogging. Your trust is important to me, and I only recommend resources I trust.