gaps basics

Mushroom Ketchup Recipe

I found this recipe from my new favorite show on YouTube, 18th Century Cooking. It is a GAPS Legal sauce and since many people do not tolerate tomatoes, I thought it would be a delicious option for a sauce!

I’m excited to add this sauce to many dishes!

This is Stage 1 legal on the GAPS Diet if you can tolerate the dried spices. Most can tolerate these spices unless you still have significant intestinal symptoms.

Ingredients for Mushroom Ketchup

  • 30 oz Mushrooms

  • 2 tbsp Salt

  • 4 Bay Leaves

  • 1 chopped onion

  • 1 Lemon, zested

  • 1 tbsp finely grated horseradish, fresh or prepared

  • ¼ tsp cloves

  • Pinch of Cayenne Pepper

  • ½ tsp allspice

  • ¼ - ½ cup apple cider vinegar

Directions for Mushroom Ketchup

Rub the top of the mushrooms to clean them. Do not wash your mushrooms!

Roughly chop the mushrooms and add to a large pot. Add in salt and bay leaves.

The mushrooms will begin reducing within a few minutes.

When they’ve reduced in size, add them to a glass container. Adding them to a glass container is important so they don’t take on the metal taste from the pot.

Leave the mushrooms on the counter overnight and no longer because mushrooms are a fungus.

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The next day, add mushrooms, chopped onions, zest of 1 lemon, grated horseradish, cloves, cayenne, allspice, and apple cider vinegar to a pot.

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Bring to a boil and then let simmer for 15 minutes.

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Let sauce cool. Put into a cloth and squeeze to strain the sauce.

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Save the solid pieces and dry them in a dehydrator. Once the solid pieces are dry, you can crush them and use them as a powdered flavoring or use the pieces as flavoring.

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Pour into a glass sealable jar.

Eggs Poached in Stock

Eggs poached in stock  was a new food for me when I started the GAPS Diet. It quickly became one of my favorite breakfasts that I am still enjoying. Sometimes, I poach an entire egg in the stock but I often I simply poach the yolks in stock.

Poaching your eggs in stock is great on cold winter’s days. It really helps you get going and warms you right off! It’s also a great way to get in your stock for the day in the summer, as it’s often cool enough in the mornings still to enjoy a warm beverage.

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I’ve always liked over easy eggs so I enjoy runny yolks. If you don’t like runny yolks, you can poach your eggs longer, or if you are poaching in your mug, you can break the yolk in the mug. The warmth of the soup will help to cook the yolk but very gently, which will help to leave much of the beneficial enzymes of the yolks intact.

Egg whites are best consumed cooked and egg yolks are best consumed raw. This is for ease of digestion as well as full nutrient potential.

You can use any stock of your choice to poach your eggs in. I had chicken stock on hand when making this recipe so I used that! Be sure to salt your eggs in the stock generously while cooking them and after.

Ingredients to Make Eggs Poached in Stock

  • 2 cups of Your Choice of Stock

  • 1-2 Eggs

  • Salt and pepper

Directions for Eggs Poached in Stock:

Bring two cups of stock to a boil. Add a generous shake of salt.

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Once stock is rapidly boiling, use a spoon to create a swirling vortex.

To the vortex, break in one to two eggs.

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Move them gently off the bottom, where they will settle.

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When your yolk gets to your desired firmness, remove the egg or pour the entire thing into a bowl or mug. This takes anywhere between 3 to 5 minutes.


GAPS Diet Stage 1 Modification: If you are on Stage 1 of the GAPS Diet, this modification will make this recipe legal.

Bring a mug’s worth of stock to a boil.

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Once the stock is boiling, add it to a mug.

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To the mug, add one to three egg yolks.

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I like to let them warm for a couple minutes. Then, I pop one entire egg yolk into my mouth, whole.  Others prefer to break the egg in the mug and stir it around. This only lightly cooks the egg yolk.


Eggs Poached in Stock

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 cups of Your Choice of Stock
  • 1-2 Eggs
  • Salt and pepper

instructions:

How to cook Eggs Poached in Stock

  1. Bring two cups of stock to a boil. Add a generous shake of salt.
  2. Once stock is rapidly boiling, use a spoon to create a swirling vortex.
  3. To the vortex, break in one to two eggs.
  4. Move them gently off the bottom, where they will settle.
  5. When your yolk gets to your desired firmness, remove the egg or pour the entire thing into a bowl or mug. This takes anywhere between 3 to 5 minutes.
GAPS Diet Stage 1 Modification:
  1. If you are on Stage 1 of the GAPS Diet, this modification will make this recipe legal.
  2. Bring a mug’s worth of stock to a boil.
  3. Once the stock is boiling, add it to a mug.
  4. To the mug, add one to three egg yolks.
  5. I like to let them warm for a couple minutes. Then, I pop one entire egg yolk into my mouth, whole. Others prefer to break the egg in the mug and stir it around. This only lightly cooks the egg yolk.
Created using The Recipes Generator

How to Ferment Almond Flour

Fermenting Almond Flour for Proper Digestion

Any seed wants to be a plant. Seeds include nuts, seeds, beans, and grains. To protect itself, a seed has phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. These substances attack the body of the animal that ate the seed, preventing the digestion of the seed. This is why we see whole seeds in bird poop.

Manually grinding seeds into flours does nothing to negate these enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. We may not necessarily see whole seeds in our stools but we don’t need to for our bodies to experience the effects of these substances. Inflammation, poor absorption of foods, and leaky gut are some of the effects on our bodies of eating seeds that are not properly prepared. To learn more about properly preparing grains, check out my video.

How to Prepare Grains Properly

When we properly prepare our grains however, we begin the germination process, which changes the seeds chemical structure. It neutralizes the anti-nutrients and enzyme inhibitors, and the seed prepares to bring life. When we eat a seed in this state, it’s nutrients are available to us and it brings life to our bodies.  

All seeds can be prepared in three ways - soaking, sprouting or fermenting. Fermenting is by far the most simple and the most beneficial. All it requires is whey. These directions are for almond flour but you can use the same concept to any nut, seed, or grain. For specific instructions on how to do this with whole seeds, see my recipe on trail mix.

The other benefit of using fermented almond flour is that it makes a much lighter end product. The fermentation process acts somewhat like a baking soda or powder, increasing the air space as your treat bakes, making it less dense.

Preparing fermented almond flour is quite easy. After letting it ferment for 24 hours, this base can be kept in the fridge for about a week. If you have a family that loves sweet treats, this is a food that you can keep on hand at all times to create a quick twenty minute cookie. Fermented almond flour is a great base for many baked goods.

Ingredients for Fermented Almond Flour:

  • 2 Cups Almond Flour

  • 1/4 Cup Whey

Directions for Fermented Almond Flour

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Add almond flour to a glass bowl.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Pour whey over almond flour.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Stir to moisten. Add additional whey if needed. Flour should be moist and crumbly but not wet.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Cover and leave for 24 hours to properly ferment. During this time, your fermenting almond flour can be left with other jar ferments because it is covered.


Fermented Almond Flour

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Almond Flour
  • 1/4 Cup Whey

instructions:

How to cook Fermented Almond Flour

  1. Add almond flour to a glass bowl.
  2. Pour whey over almond flour.
  3. Stir to moisten. Add additional whey if needed. Flour should be moist and crumbly but not wet.
  4. Cover and leave for 24 hours to properly ferment. During this time, your fermenting almond flour can be left with other jar ferments because it is covered.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Chicken Stock Recipe

Meat stock is a pillar in healing a leaky gut but this rich food is beneficial to anyone. It provides large amounts of the immune system’s favorite foods, is very easy to digest, and is a great base to modify for other healing and nutritious recipes.  

Meat stock is meant to be a meal in itself. It’s short cooking time allows the meat to remain edible while still enriching stock with easy to absorb nutrients. This is the perfect thing to eat anytime you are feeling ill or stressed or “can’t get filled up” hungry. These are some of the reasons meat stock is such an important part of the healing process of the GAPS Diet. Any time you are consuming meat stock on a regular basis, your body will be receiving the healing benefit.

Meat stock can be made into a soup or simply drunk on its own as a hot beverage with a meal. You can also poach a couple eggs in your stock for a rich breakfast. Stock can also be used to cook rice or other soaked grains to increase their digestibility and nutritional content. In short, this should be considered a staple to have in your kitchen at all times, either in the fridge or the freezer.

This recipe is stock without aromatics. I prefer stock this way currently because it’s a neutral base ingredient that can be changed in any way for any other recipe. Making stock this way, you can also feed your dog the extra chicken meat because the base doesn’t have onions. Make sure you debone the chicken before giving to your dog; they should not have chicken bones.

You’ll notice I set aside the breasts of the chicken. Good stock should be 80% meat and 20% bone with a joint. Using a whole chicken, this ratio is fulfilled without needed the breasts. You can use the breasts in other recipes or add to the soup later for more tender meat.

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There are a variety of ways you can skim the scum off the top of your stock. I usually use a slotted spoon but you can also use a mesh scum skimmer, a slotted spoon, a small strainer, or a large soup spoon.

Skimming the scum off the top is where you can tell the quality of your meat. If your meat is poor quality, had a lot of hormones or was poorly processed, you’ll get scum that’s heavy, grey and unappetizing. If you have a good quality chicken, you will have a small amount of light almost white colored scum that appears as a lighter foam. This is also where you can tell if your meat has gone bad at this point. If your chicken is not good, you will smell an obvious sulfur smell.

You can store your stock in the fridge or the freezer, depending on how quickly you’ll consume the batch.

A note about Meat Stock and the GAPS Intro Diet:

When Dr. Natasha Campbell talks about meat in stage 1, she’s referring to eating primarily the gelatinous meats like skin, joints and connective tissue. When meat is added on Stage 2, she means the muscle eats, the only thing we Americans consider to be meat. Eating a lot of muscle meat can be constipating so if this is your issue, be sure to eat every last bit of the skin and joints.

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Fill large stock pot with water.

Remove chicken from package and remove giblets from interior. Rinse chicken.

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Cut chicken into 8 pieces, joints exposed. First, remove the wings at the base of the joint.

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Slice the drumsticks, pop the joint out of the meat and finish slicing off the drumstick.

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Slice down the center of the bird, exposing the back. Slice the back off.

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With the chest cavity down, slice to the right of the breast bone, removing one breast and then the other.

Pull the tenders off the breast (the underside of the breast) and remove the skin from the breast. Set the breasts aside for a different recipe.

Optionally, seperate the drumstick from the thigh.

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This is how your chicken should look once you've cut it into the pieces.

Place pieces of chicken into the water. First, the back, then breastbone, then wings, thighs, then the drumsticks. Add in all giblets and extra skin from breasts.

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Meat should be covered with about two inches of water. Here I am measuring the water level with my finger.

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Bring to a boil. It usually takes 10-15 minutes to bring to a boil.

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Skim the scum off the top using a mesh scum skimmer, a slotted spoon or a large soup spoon. Try to leave as much fat as you can in the pot.

If you miss skimming the scum, your meat stock is fine. The scum is simply impurities. Removing them improves the overall taste of your meat stock but leaving them is not harmful.

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Reduce your heat and leave the pot at a simmer for 1 - 1 ½ hours.

Longer simmering will make the meat tasteless. Longer than 8 hours causes the histamine amounts to be higher which can cause nerve irritation symptoms in people with a leaky gut.

Simmering means movement in the water and very little movement on the surface.

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Remove the whole pieces of chicken onto a platter. I use a strainer to make it easier.

Allow the chicken pieces to cool.

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Debone the chicken chunks.

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When you find the heart - SCORE! Eat it! This is my reward to myself for deboning the chicken.

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Make sure you remove only the bones! Everything else is delicious and healthy for you. This photo shows all that should be left after you have deboned the chicken.

Toss the bones or freeze them for bone broth at a later time. I don’t like bone broth so I toss them.

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Once stock has cooled slightly, pour into jars or use immediately for soup, like this GAPS Legal Chicken Tortilla Soup.

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If you’d like to freeze your stock, wait for it to cool to room temperature. This inhibits bacteria growth.

Then, to cool completely, store in the fridge.

Once your stock has completely cooled, add to a BPA free freezer bag. Lay inside a container to shape your bag. Freeze solid.

Do this one bag at a time!

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After deboning the chicken, sift through the meat picking out all the skin and organ meat.

Add these back to your stock and blend them with an immersion blender or blender.

It will get frothy! Don’t be alarmed!

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Chicken Stock

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • Filtered Water
  • 1 Whole Chicken

instructions:

How to cook Chicken Stock

  1. Fill large stock pot with water.
  2. Remove chicken from package and remove giblets from interior. Rinse chicken.
  3. Cut chicken into 8 pieces, joints exposed. First, remove the wings at the base of the joint.
  4. Slice the drumsticks, pop the joint out of the meat and finish slicing off the drumstick.
  5. Slice down the center of the bird, exposing the back. Slice the back off.
  6. With the chest cavity down, slice to the right of the breast bone, removing one breast and then the other.
  7. Pull the tenders off the breast (the underside of the breast) and remove the skin from the breast. Set the breasts aside for a different recipe.
  8. Optionally, separate the drumstick from the thigh.
  9. This is how your chicken should look once you've cut it into the pieces.
  10. Place pieces of chicken into the water. First, the back, then breastbone, then wings, thighs, then the drumsticks. Add in all giblets and extra skin from breasts.
  11. Meat should be covered with about two inches of water. Here I am measuring the water level with my finger.
  12. Bring to a boil. It usually takes 10-15 minutes to bring to a boil.
  13. Skim the scum off the top using a mesh scum skimmer, a slotted spoon or a large soup spoon. Try to leave as much fat as you can in the pot.
  14. If you miss skimming the scum, your meat stock is fine. The scum is simply impurities. Removing them improves the overall taste of your meat stock but leaving them is not harmful.
  15. Reduce your heat and leave the pot at a simmer for 1 - 1 ½ hours.
  16. Longer simmering will make the meat tasteless. Longer than 8 hours causes the histamine amounts to be higher which can cause nerve irritation symptoms in people with a leaky gut.
  17. Simmering means movement in the water and very little movement on the surface.
  18. Remove the whole pieces of chicken onto a platter. I use a strainer to make it easier.
  19. Allow the chicken pieces to cool.
  20. Debone the chicken chunks.
  21. When you find the heart - SCORE! Eat it! This is my reward to myself for deboning the chicken.
  22. Make sure you remove only the bones! Everything else is delicious and healthy for you. This photo shows all that should be left after you have deboned the chicken.
  23. Toss the bones or freeze them for bone broth at a later time. I don’t like bone broth so I toss them.
  24. Once stock has cooled slightly, pour into jars or use immediately for soup, like this GAPS Legal Chicken Tortilla Soup.
  25. If you’d like to freeze your stock, wait for it to cool to room temperature. This inhibits bacteria growth.
  26. Then, to cool completely, store in the fridge.
  27. Once your stock has completely cooled, add to a BPA free freezer bag. Lay inside a container to shape your bag. Freeze solid.
  28. Do this one bag at a time!
  29. After deboning the chicken, sift through the meat picking out all the skin and organ meat.
  30. Add these back to your stock and blend them with an immersion blender or blender.
  31. It will get frothy! Don’t be alarmed!
Created using The Recipes Generator

Russian Custard

GAPS Legal Custard Dessert

Russian custard is a delicious desert or afternoon snack. It is rich, and just sweet enough. You can whip it up in just a few minutes, and it is easy to double or triple to feed another (or more for yourself).

Russian custard is just two ingredients: raw egg yolks and honey. Don't let the raw egg yolk stop you! The texture and taste of the custard are very different than that of a raw egg yolk. I've had multiple people express their pleasant surprise at how much they like it (despite being reluctant to try it because of the egg yolks). So give it a try—it just might become a favorite of yours!

For people on GAPS, this recipe is legal as early as Intro Stage 2

Russian Custard Recipe

Ingredients for Russian Custard:

  • 2 Eggs*

  • 1/2 - 1 tsp Honey

*As per the usual warning, eating undercooked or raw eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness.

You can multiply this recipe for as many servings as you want. The above ratio is for one serving.

Directions for Russian Custard:

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Separate the egg yolks from the egg whites. Place the yolks in a separate bowl.

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Add honey to the egg yolks. I find 1/2 tsp of honey to be plenty and very sweet. You can add more if you need it. Or less.

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Beat the egg yolks with a whisk until they are thick and change color. They should look much lighter, with a little white undertone. This takes about five minutes. A fork does not work well for whisking!

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Serve in a small bowl for a delicious dessert or mid-afternoon snack.

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Russian Custard

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 Eggs*
  • 1/2 - 1 tsp Honey
  • *As per the usual warning, eating undercooked or raw eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness.
  • You can multiply this recipe for as many servings as you want. The above ratio is for one serving.

instructions:

How to cook Russian Custard

  1. Separate the egg yolks from the egg whites. Place the yolks in a separate bowl.
  2. Add honey to the egg yolks. I find 1/2 tsp of honey to be plenty and very sweet. You can add more if you need it. Or less.
  3. Beat the egg yolks with a whisk until they are thick and change color. They should look much lighter, with a little white undertone. This takes about five minutes. A fork does not work well for whisking!
  4. Serve in a small bowl for a delicious dessert or mid-afternoon snack.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Simple Easy Hollandaise Sauce Recipe

GAPS Legal Hollandaise Sauce Recipe Made with Limes

What do you do when you are bored or eggs two ways (scrambled or fried?)... make hollandaise sauce, of course!

I'm not sure how the true chefs will react to this recipe because I'm sure I don't get my hollandaise sauce as smooth as it's supposed to be, but so many of you have asked for this favorite recipe of mine that I want to share it here! I have now made this sauce dozens of times and there are a few principles I have learned about what makes this dish different than plain scrambled eggs.

#1 Don't do this in a cast-iron or your eggs will taste like iron.

#2 Lower heat makes for smoother sauce. But if you are in a hurry and don't mind lumps, more heat and less time still creates a delicious meal.

#3 The acid (lime or lemon juice) is the real key to this dish. I make my plain scrambled eggs with similar amounts of butter, but it is the lime that makes the eggs more smooth.

#4 I prefer lime over lemon because it is more mild and I feel I can add more of it without overpowering the dish. I believe this makes the hollandaise sauce easier to successfully make. After having done this many times there is a color change I look for when adding the lime juice. When I achieve this color change I know that my sauce will turn out decently smooth.

As you make this sauce, don't give up if you don't achieve your desired smoothness the first time! As with most cooking, this is an art and skill that you will get better at with practice. Enjoy your hollandaise sauce!

Simple Hollandaise Sauce

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs

  • 3 (ish) tablespoons Butter

  • ½ lime, freshly squeezed

Directions

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Melt butter in pan on very low heat.

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A smooth hollandaise sauce is achievable! Whisk the eggs quickly before adding to melted butter. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Beat two eggs in a bowl.

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Hollandaise Sauce is my most requested recipe! I eat this GAPS Legal and GAPS friendly sauce on chicken, vegetables and with eggs. It's also Whole 30 and Paleo friendly! Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Add eggs to pan as soon as butter is melted.

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The key to making a good Hollandaise Sauce is to whisk constantly for a smooth sauce. This GAPS legal recipe couldn't be easier! Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Mix sauce together, stirring constantly. Add lime juice. Using a whisk will get you a smoother sauce but I don’t mind a chunkier sauce.

If your eggs start to thicken, turn down your heat or add more lime juice.

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An easy simple recipe for Hollandaise Sauce with only three ingredients. This recipe is legal on the GAPS Diet, Whole 30 and Paleo. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

The sauce is done when it holds together more and you can start to see the bottom of the pan.

Serve immediately! Serve with chicken, artichokes, vegetables.

Note:

Do not cook this is in an cast iron pan! Use a stainless steel pan with good heat protection.

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Hollandaise Sauce with Limes

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • 3 (ish) tablespoons Butter
  • ½ lime, freshly squeezed

instructions:

How to cook Hollandaise Sauce with Limes

  1. Melt butter in pan on very low heat.
  2. A smooth hollandaise sauce is achievable! Whisk the eggs quickly before adding to melted butter. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.
  3. Beat two eggs in a bowl.
  4. Hollandaise Sauce is my most requested recipe! I eat this GAPS Legal and GAPS friendly sauce on chicken, vegetables and with eggs. It's also Whole 30 and Paleo friendly! Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.
  5. Add eggs to pan as soon as butter is melted.
  6. The key to making a good Hollandaise Sauce is to whisk constantly for a smooth sauce. This GAPS legal recipe couldn't be easier! Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.
  7. Mix sauce together, stirring constantly. Add lime juice. Using a whisk will get you a smoother sauce but I don’t mind a chunkier sauce.
  8. If your eggs start to thicken, turn down your heat or add more lime juice.
  9. An easy simple recipe for Hollandaise Sauce with only three ingredients. This recipe is legal on the GAPS Diet, Whole 30 and Paleo. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.
  10. The sauce is done when it holds together more and you can start to see the bottom of the pan.
  11. Serve immediately! Serve with chicken, artichokes, vegetables.
  12. Note:
  13. Do not cook this is in an cast iron pan! Use a stainless steel pan with good heat protection.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Liver Pâté Recipe

Liver pâté makes me feel like I am eating a treat when I'm really eating something healthy—very healthy and good for me! You can make pate out of any type of liver, but chicken liver is the most mild, so that is a great one to start with if you are not used to eating liver. Once you make this delicious mixture, you can eat it many ways. Honestly, I mostly just eat it by the spoonful, but there are many other ways you can eat pate, including the ones listed below. After you make this wonderful superfood, let us know in the comments your favorite ways to spice and eat pate.

Ways to Eat liver Pate:

  • It’s good on it’s own

  • Spread it on crackers or bread if you are not following the GAPS diet

  • Create GAPS Legal “crackers” with slices of avocado or zucchini

  • Layer with fermented veggies like cabbage or sauerkraut

  • Spread on pieces of cheese

  • Dip veggies such as carrot sticks,

  • Add the pate to lean meats like chicken or turkey or game meat like venison or turkey to give it a boost of fat

GAPS Legal Liver Pate Ingredients

  • ½ c Liver

  • Butter or lard

  • 2 tbsp chopped Onion

  • 3 cloves of Garlic

  • Spices

    • 1/16 tsp nutmeg, cloves and ginger

    • ¼ tsp of cinnamon

    • ¼ to ½ tsp Salt

  • 2 small pans

  • Blender or Food Processor

Directions for making liver pate for the gaps diet

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Roughly chop about 2 tbsp of an onion. The smaller you chop your onion, the quicker it will cook but careful - too small and it’s easy to burn!

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Add about ½ inch of water to a pan. Add liver to pan to poach.

After 2-3 minutes, flip the liver to poach the other side.

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Add butter or lard to a small skillet.  Add the onions to the skillet, stir. Add the garlic to the skillet.

The liver is done when it is still a little pink inside but not red. A little blood coming out of the liver when it’s done. If the juices are all clear, the liver is overcooked.

Add liver to the food processor or blender. Process quickly on its own.

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Add cooked onions and garlic to food processor or blender. Add enough fat so that the ratio is about 40% fat, 60% liver, about 3 tbsp for ½ cup of liver. Lard has less of a flavor than butter, butter will give your pate a different flavor.

Blend until smooth.

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Add spices and ¼ tsp salt to the blender or food processor. Blend until smooth. If needed, add remaining ½ tsp of salt.

Serve pate warm or chilled.


Liver Pate

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ c Liver
  • Butter or lard
  • 2 tbsp chopped Onion
  • 3 cloves of Garlic
  • Spices
  • 1/16 tsp nutmeg, cloves and ginger
  • ¼ tsp of cinnamon
  • ¼ to ½ tsp Salt
  • 2 small pans
  • Blender or Food Processor

instructions:

How to cook Liver Pate

  1. Roughly chop about 2 tbsp of an onion. The smaller you chop your onion, the quicker it will cook but careful - too small and it’s easy to burn!
  2. Add about ½ inch of water to a pan. Add liver to pan to poach.
  3. After 2-3 minutes, flip the liver to poach the other side.
  4. Add butter or lard to a small skillet. Add the onions to the skillet, stir. Add the garlic to the skillet.
  5. The liver is done when it is still a little pink inside but not red. A little blood coming out of the liver when it’s done. If the juices are all clear, the liver is overcooked.
  6. Add liver to the food processor or blender. Process quickly on its own.
  7. Add cooked onions and garlic to food processor or blender. Add enough fat so that the ratio is about 40% fat, 60% liver, about 3 tbsp for ½ cup of liver. Lard has less of a flavor than butter, butter will give your pate a different flavor.
  8. Blend until smooth.
  9. Add spices and ¼ tsp salt to the blender or food processor. Blend until smooth. If needed, add remaining ½ tsp of salt.
  10. Serve pate warm or chilled.
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Butternut Squash GAPS Pancakes Recipe

This recipe was adapted from the GAPS Pancake Recipe in the Gut and Psychology Syndrome book by Dr. Natasha Campbell. Makes 3 Pancakes.

GAPS Legal Pancakes Ingredients

  • 1/2 c. cooked Butternut Squash

  • 3 Farm Fresh Eggs

  • Fat such as lard, butter or sour cream

  • Salt

  • Toppings such as date syrup or cinnamon

  • Food Processor or Blender

Directions for gaps legal pancakes

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Cut butternut squash into halves. Deseed and bake face down on a parchment lined baking tray for 40 minutes at 400 degrees until very soft.

When squash has cooled and can be handled, scoop out the flesh with a spoon into a large bowl.

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Add squash, eggs and fat to blender. For every 1/2 cup of squash, add 3 eggs, 1 tbsp of fat and 2 pinches of salt. The traditional GAPS pancake recipe uses almond butter to thicken instead of fat. Since this is a nut free recipe, I used fat to thicken instead. Blend until smooth.

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Add a couple tablespoons of fat to a pan. Heat on low heat until oil is simmering.

Make sure your fat is glistening in the pan before adding your pancake batter. You can also add one drop of water into the pan. If it sizzles, the oil is ready.When pan is ready, add scoop of pancake batter. Cook pancake on low heat for about 10 minutes.

You can cook multiple pancakes at a time but I’ve had the best luck cooking one at a time!

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Similar to traditional pancakes, they will bubble on top when they are ready to flip.

Cook on the second side for about two to three minutes. Be careful - this second side will cook much faster than the first!

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Once cooked, add butter. Keep as a savory pancake or for a sweeter treat, add date syrup or cinnamon. Do not add cinnamon to the mixture before you cook - it will burn!

Notes: If your fat gets too hot and burns, rinse your pan out and start with new fat for the next pancake. Otherwise, all the pancakes will taste burn.

Blackened and burnt sections of the pancake contain high levels of carbon, which is difficult to digest. These should be avoided as much as possible on the introduction stages of the GAPS diet.


Butternut Squash Pancakes

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prep time: cook time: total time:
This recipe was adapted from the GAPS Pancake Recipe in the Gut and Psychology Syndrome book by Dr. Natasha Campbell. Makes 3 Pancakes.

ingredients:

  • 1/2 c. cooked Butternut Squash
  • 3 Farm Fresh Eggs
  • Fat such as lard, butter or sour cream
  • Salt
  • Toppings such as date syrup or cinnamon
  • Food Processor or Blender

instructions:

How to cook Butternut Squash Pancakes

  1. Cut butternut squash into halves. Deseed and bake face down on a parchment lined baking tray for 40 minutes at 400 degrees until very soft.
  2. When squash has cooled and can be handled, scoop out the flesh with a spoon into a large bowl.
  3. Add squash, eggs and fat to blender. For every 1/2 cup of squash, add 3 eggs, 1 tbsp of fat and 2 pinches of salt. The traditional GAPS pancake recipe uses almond butter to thicken instead of fat. Since this is a nut free recipe, I used fat to thicken instead. Blend until smooth.
  4. Add a couple tablespoons of fat to a pan. Heat on low heat until oil is simmering.
  5. Make sure your fat is glistening in the pan before adding your pancake batter. You can also add one drop of water into the pan. If it sizzles, the oil is ready.When pan is ready, add scoop of pancake batter. Cook pancake on low heat for about 10 minutes.
  6. You can cook multiple pancakes at a time but I’ve had the best luck cooking one at a time!
  7. Similar to traditional pancakes, they will bubble on top when they are ready to flip.
  8. Cook on the second side for about two to three minutes. Be careful - this second side will cook much faster than the first!
  9. Once cooked, add butter. Keep as a savory pancake or for a sweeter treat, add date syrup or cinnamon. Do not add cinnamon to the mixture before you cook - it will burn!
  10. Notes: If your fat gets too hot and burns, rinse your pan out and start with new fat for the next pancake. Otherwise, all the pancakes will taste burn.
  11. Blackened and burnt sections of the pancake contain high levels of carbon, which is difficult to digest. These should be avoided as much as possible on the introduction stages of the GAPS diet.
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Lovely Lard

Eating animal fat is important to our body's health. But eating enough fat can be challenging, especially when there is a dairy allergy. Lard is a great alternative to butter, and its taste is more mild than that of tallow. You can buy lard at the store, but it is expensive and may be hydrogenated or of poor quality. Making your own lard is simple and easy, and can be done for a fraction of the price. To make lard, you first start out with pig fat. This can be obtained from a butcher, or even trimmed off of fatty cuts of pork like the Boston butt. The process of turning fat into lard or tallow is called rendering. In this post I describe rendering lard, but the process for rendering tallow (which is fat from beef, bison, deer, lamb, or elk) is the same, although for tallow it may take a few more hours.   There are two kinds of pig fat. Leaf fat is from fat surrounding the internal organs. It is very mild in taste and used to be reserved for making pies and pastries. Body fat is from the layer of fat beneath the skin. This has a slightly stronger pork taste, and is better used in cooking meat and vegetables. Along with a different taste, there is a different look to the two types of fat. Body fat is in large pieces, and appears more dense and flat. Leaf fat is in smaller pieces, has a fluffier texture, and may contain membranes. The fat you get from a butcher may contain both types of fat. If that is the case, I recommend separating out the two types of fat and rendering them separately so you can use them for different purposes. However, there is no problem in mixing them and rendering them together. (The fat I have pictured below is leaf fat.)  

Making Lard:

First, cut up the pig fat into small 1-2 inch sized cubes. If using leaf fat, remove as much membrane as possible.

Put the fat cubes in a medium saucepan on low heat. You may use a crockpot, but it must have a very low setting or the fat will burn. Stir occasionally and watch closely. Don't let the lard smoke!

With time, the solid pieces of fat will get smaller, and the liquid will increase.

After a few hours, when the lard is liquified, set up your strainer and cloth.

Below you see pictured a jar, jar funnel, and metal strainer. Metal is best because the lard is hot! To finish it off, place a cloth. You can use an old napkin or other cloth, or several layers of cheesecloth.

Pour the liquid into the strainer. The liquid will go into the jar and the cracklings will stay in the cloth.

Squeeze the rest of the liquid out of the cracklings.

Cracklings separated from the liquid lard. Salt and fry these. You can eat them like bacon bits, or just plain.

Allow the jar of lard to cool on the counter.

When the lard is cool you can move it to the fridge, or leave it on the counter.

If you are careful not to contaminate the jar, the lard will last for several months, even left out at room temperature. Use the lard in your cooking— it is a wonderful thing to fry up vegetables or meat and add fat to your diet. Bon appétit!

Onward!


How to Make Lard

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prep time: cook time: total time:

instructions:

How to cook How to Make Lard

  1. First, cut up the pig fat into small 1-2 inch sized cubes. If using leaf fat, remove as much membrane as possible.
  2. Put the fat cubes in a medium saucepan on low heat. You may use a crockpot, but it must have a very low setting or the fat will burn. Stir occasionally and watch closely. Don't let the lard smoke!
  3. With time, the solid pieces of fat will get smaller, and the liquid will increase.
  4. After a few hours, when the lard is liquified, set up your strainer and cloth.
  5. Below you see pictured a jar, jar funnel, and metal strainer. Metal is best because the lard is hot! To finish it off, place a cloth. You can use an old napkin or other cloth, or several layers of cheesecloth.
  6. Pour the liquid into the strainer. The liquid will go into the jar and the cracklings will stay in the cloth.
  7. Squeeze the rest of the liquid out of the cracklings.
  8. Cracklings separated from the liquid lard. Salt and fry these. You can eat them like bacon bits, or just plain.
  9. Allow the jar of lard to cool on the counter.
  10. When the lard is cool you can move it to the fridge, or leave it on the counter.
  11. If you are careful not to contaminate the jar, the lard will last for several months, even left out at room temperature. Use the lard in your cooking— it is a wonderful thing to fry up vegetables or meat and add fat to your diet. Bon appétit!
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Making the Vegetable Medley

One of the most important ferments in the GAPS™ diet is the vegetablemedley. You can find this recipe in Dr. Natasha Cambell-McBride's book, Gut and Psychology Syndrome. Her recipe is for a bowl ferment, but you can also make it in a jar, which is how I prefer to make it. And this is the recipe we are going to do today! This recipe contains five different vegetables: beets (good for liver and blood cleansing), cabbage (stimulates digestion), carrots (contain vitamin A), and cauliflower (makes it taste better, believe me), and garlic (good for immune support). It makes a very rich and flavorful liquid, which is also a wonderful probiotic drink.

No matter how delicious this is, and how much you like it, drink only a little bit in the beginning to avoid die-off. Respect the ferments, man!

Gather your ingredients and supplies

  • Glass jar, 1/2 gallon

  • Sea salt, 3-4 TBS

  • Medium beet

  • Carrots (3)

  • Cauliflower

  • Cabbage

  • Garlic (5-7 cloves), fresh or fermented

Instructions

To a clean half-gallon jar, add about 1/2 cup of each vegetable.You can add them in any order you like. The main purpose of the vegetable medley is to drink the liquid, so make sure the ingredients you add only fill the jar half way (or a little more). This will create enough liquid to make it worth it!

Add the beets

And carrots

And so on...

Last of all, garlic and salt

When all the ingredients are in the jar, it should be less than 3/4 full. Add filtered water, to the shoulder of the jar. Finally, add a cabbage leaf or two to hold all the ingredients under the water. I add a pinch of salt after the cabbage leaves are in place to discourage bad bacterial growth. All that's left is to tightly screw on the lid and leave it on the counter.

After 7 days, move the jar to the fridge and consume the liquid until it's gone, and eat the vegetable pieces. This can be a perpetual ferment. To do this, daily drink what you need, then replace that amount with filtered water, and continue to leave it out on the counter. Keep up with this process until the vegetables are spent (they turn grey and tasteless).

Before

[Pictures missing in transfer*]

One week later

That's it! You have successfully made the veggie medley! Once you get the basics down, you can experiment with different vegetable combinations (eg. broccoli instead of cauliflower). Let us know your favorite combinations!

Onward!


Vegetable Medley

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • Glass jar, 1/2 gallon
  • Sea salt, 3-4 TBS
  • Medium beet
  • Carrots (3)
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic (5-7 cloves), fresh or fermented

instructions:

How to cook Vegetable Medley

  1. To a clean half-gallon jar, add about 1/2 cup of each vegetable.You can add them in any order you like. The main purpose of the vegetable medley is to drink the liquid, so make sure the ingredients you add only fill the jar half way (or a little more). This will create enough liquid to make it worth it!
  2. Add the beets
  3. And carrots
  4. And so on...
  5. Last of all, garlic and salt
  6. When all the ingredients are in the jar, it should be less than 3/4 full. Add filtered water, to the shoulder of the jar. Finally, add a cabbage leaf or two to hold all the ingredients under the water. I add a pinch of salt after the cabbage leaves are in place to discourage bad bacterial growth. All that's left is to tightly screw on the lid and leave it on the counter.
  7. After 7 days, move the jar to the fridge and consume the liquid until it's gone, and eat the vegetable pieces. This can be a perpetual ferment. To do this, daily drink what you need, then replace that amount with filtered water, and continue to leave it out on the counter. Keep up with this process until the vegetables are spent (they turn grey and tasteless).
  8. That's it! You have successfully made the veggie medley! Once you get the basics down, you can experiment with different vegetable combinations (eg. broccoli instead of cauliflower). 
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GAPS Milkshake

Our recipe this week is a simple, but powerful one! It is called the GAPS™ milkshake, and it packs a powerful punch! This delicious, satisfying and helpful beverage is a wonderful way to daily consume your freshly-pressed juices, and can even be a meal.

The GAPS™ milkshake is mix of juice, protein, and fat. Because it is easily digested, usually in about 20 minutes, it can be eaten when you don't have much time to sit and digest. But because it contains fat and protein, as well as sugar, it can sustain you for a while, often a few hours.

Let's get down to making it! You need a few simple ingredients.

  1. Freshly pressed juices (I like carrots, but you can use any juice mixture)

  2. Sour cream (creme fraische), coconut oil, or another fat

  3. Raw egg (whole or just the yoke)

  4. Raw honey (optional, and only a little!)

Juice the carrot (and/or other vegetables and fruits). I use organic vegetables so I just rinse them off (sometimes). You can see my (not) high-end juicer in the picture! But it works! Don't feel like you have to spend hundreds of dollars to juice (this one was about $40). It is a centrifuge juicer, and I try to consume the juices within 15 minutes to get the most enzyme activity, but again, it works! Successful GAPS is not about perfection, it is about action!

Once you have your juice in a glass, you are ready to add your other ingredients. Add 1-2 raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs. If you do add the white, I recommend using a spring whisk or a blender to break up the white--that is a hard texture to get down! With raw eggs, it is also important to know the source of your eggs (were the chickens healthy) and try not to touch the shell with the egg. If there happens to be any salmonella present, it is likely still on the outside of the egg, not the inside. Of course, there is no guarantee, especially if the eggs are washed (this breaks down the protective layer around the egg), so consume at your own risk! But I have yet to get sick, even using store bought eggs sometimes.

Add the sour cream (a good-sized dollop). The sour cream is there primarily to slow the absorption of sugar from the juice—add to taste. You can also add coconut oil if you are not tolerating dairy (technically this makes it a GAPS Smoothie) Stir, whisk or blend together.

You can add a little honey if you need to. It is better to add some fruit to your juice ingredients instead of honey, but that isn't always an option, especially on early stages. I have found that the egg whites are a little bitter, and when I add a whole egg instead of just the yolk, I often need a little honey to help it go down. That's it! All that's left is to enjoy it!

And it's gone!

As I said, this is a great "meal" for those on-the-go mornings. Especially if you are hungry early in the morning, this is a great thing to drink, as it is not a burden to the digestive system. The juices support your body's cleansing processes, which are often happening from 4am-10am every day. You could also add beet kvass to this beverage as an extra liver cleanser. It can overwhelm the flavor, so I prefer to drink mine separately. Experiment with your preferences, and with the recipe! Let us know how you like it best!

Onward!

GAPS Milkshake

GAPSmilkshake-150x150.jpg
  • Freshly Pressed Juices

  • Sour cream, creme faiche, coconut oil, or another fat

  • Raw Egg ((whole or just the yoke))

  • Raw Honey ((optional and only a little))

  1. Juice the carrot (and/or other vegetables and fruits).

  2. Add 1-2 raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs. If you do add the white, I recommend using a spring whisk or a blender to break up the white–that is a hard texture to get down!

  3. Add the sour cream to taste. The sour cream is there primarily to slow the absorption of sugar from the juice.

  4. Stir, whisk or blend together.

  5. Add a little honey if you need to

With raw eggs, it is also important to know the source of your eggs (were the chickens healthy) and try not to touch the shell with the egg. If there happens to be any salmonella present, it is likely still on the outside of the egg, not the inside. Of course, there is no guarantee, especially if the eggs are washed (this breaks down the protective layer around the egg), so consume at your own risk! 

I have found that the egg whites are a little bitter, and when I add a whole egg instead of just the yolk, I often need a little honey to help it go down.


GAPS Milkshake

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • Freshly Pressed Juices
  • Sour cream, creme faiche, coconut oil, or another fat
  • Raw Egg ((whole or just the yoke))
  • Raw Honey ((optional and only a little))

instructions:

How to cook GAPS Milkshake

  1. Juice the carrot (and/or other vegetables and fruits).
  2. Add 1-2 raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs. If you do add the white, I recommend using a spring whisk or a blender to break up the white–that is a hard texture to get down!
  3. Add the sour cream to taste. The sour cream is there primarily to slow the absorption of sugar from the juice.
  4. Stir, whisk or blend together.
  5. Add a little honey if you need to

NOTES:

With raw eggs, it is also important to know the source of your eggs (were the chickens healthy) and try not to touch the shell with the egg. If there happens to be any salmonella present, it is likely still on the outside of the egg, not the inside. Of course, there is no guarantee, especially if the eggs are washed (this breaks down the protective layer around the egg), so consume at your own risk! I have found that the egg whites are a little bitter, and when I add a whole egg instead of just the yolk, I often need a little honey to help it go down.
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Beet Kvass

Beet Kvass is a liver tonic. Anyone can make this simple fermented drink! It requires only a few ingredients, and only a few minutes to "put up."

Want to learn how? Good!

But first, some definitions:

  • Kvass: beverage

  • "Put up" a ferment: combine ingredients and set it aside to let it ferment

  • Sea Salt: unrefined salt, salt that is the same way it was found in nature

    • contains many trace minerals, depending on which type it is

    • Celtic Sea Salt, Real Salt, Himalayan Salt, others

    • most fermenting enthusiasts prefer Himalayan for fermenting (it's a taste thing)

  • Shoulder of the jar: the area of a jar where the jar narrows to become the mouth

  • Whey: the slightly yellow, watery stuff that is on the top of yogurt or sour cream

    • you can get your own whey by straining yogurt through an old cotton napkin, or several layers of cheese-cloth

Ingredients & Supplies to make beet kvass

  • 1/2 gallon glass mason jar

  • 1 medium-large beet

  • 2-4 TBS sea salt

  • cold, filtered water

  • 4 TBS whey (optional)

Directions to Make Your Own Beet Kvass

Cut the beet into 1-2 inch cubes. Do not cut too small or shred the beet! Too much surface area and the beets will ferment too fast and create alcohol!

You do not need to peel the beets, just wash fairly well and cut off the top. A little organic dirt will add minerals and soil bacterium.

Place the cut beet in the mason jar. The beets should fill the jar about 1/4-1/3 of the way

Add salt to the jar. 4 TBS is the traditional amount if no whey added, see tips below

Add optional whey. If whey is used, you can decrease the salt by half.

Fill the jar up to the shoulder with cold, filtered water.

Seal the jar with a metal lid and ring, closing tightly.

Gently tip and swirl the jar to help the salt dissolve.

Set on the counter for 3-5 days, until the kvass is a rich purple color.

Move to the fridge (the beets stay in the liquid)

Consume daily!

You can use the beets for two batches

  • when the liquid is almost gone (about a pint left) then refill with water and salt

  • set on the counter for another 3-5 days

  • when the liquid is gone the second time, discard the beets and start fresh

Tips and Tricks for beet kvass

  • My beets are floating!

    • It's okay if the beets are floating-they often do, but will eventually sink. You don't need a weight for this ferment.

  • How much salt?????

    • The amount of salt largely depends on you--your taste, and your climate.

    • The salt is there to inhibit bad bacteria growth until the good bacteria are strong enough.

    • Beet kvass doesn't seem to go bad often, especially in the dry climate of Colorado.

    • I use about 3 TBS salt and no whey, with no problem. No whey! Ha ha ha, get it?

    • People like their kvass with more or less salt, so see how it tastes best to you.

  • I have a white film on the top and/or the bottom of my kvass.

    • DON'T start over!

    • This is merely the hard working lactobacillus bacterium thriving!

    • You can shake or stir in the white film, or skim it off, if you prefer.

  • I have blue or black, or another color of mold!

    • This is NOT okay. If you find this, throw it out and start over!

  • How much do I take each day?

    • It is generally recommended that you take up to 4 ounces 2x/day.

    • As with all ferments, it is important to START SLOW and increase gradually.

    • It's best to take this on an empty stomach, like first thing in the morning.

Love beets?!?!?!?

Can't get enough of them?!?!?

Learn about other great ways to eat beets here!

Happy fermenting!

Onward!


Beet Kvass

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 1/2 gallon glass mason jar
  • 1 medium-large beet
  • 2-4 TBS sea salt
  • cold, filtered water
  • 4 TBS whey (optional)

instructions:

How to cook Beet Kvass

  1. Cut the beet into 1-2 inch cubes. Do not cut too small or shred the beet! Too much surface area and the beets will ferment too fast and create alcohol!
  2. You do not need to peel the beets, just wash fairly well and cut off the top. A little organic dirt will add minerals and soil bacterium.
  3. Place the cut beet in the mason jar. The beets should fill the jar about 1/4-1/3 of the way
  4. Add salt to the jar. 4 TBS is the traditional amount if no whey added, see tips below
  5. Add optional whey. If whey is used, you can decrease the salt by half.
  6. Fill the jar up to the shoulder with cold, filtered water.
  7. Seal the jar with a metal lid and ring, closing tightly.
  8. Gently tip and swirl the jar to help the salt dissolve.
  9. Set on the counter for 3-5 days, until the kvass is a rich purple color.
  10. Move to the fridge (the beets stay in the liquid)
  11. Consume daily!
  12. You can use the beets for two batches: when the liquid is almost gone (about a pint left) then refill with water and salt, set on the counter for another 3-5 day. When the liquid is gone the second time, discard the beets and start fresh.
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