fermented

How to Make Almond Butter

Ingredients for Fermented Almond Butter

  • 3 cups Almonds

  • ½ cup Whey

  • Filtered Water

  • Salt

Directions for Fermented Almond Butter

Place your almonds in filtered water with whey. Allow to soak for 24 hours.

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Drain the almonds in a colander and rinse with filtered water.

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Place almonds into a food processor. Pulse them consistently until you get almond butter.

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Once almonds are the consistency of almond butter, add four shakes of salt. Pulse for several more seconds. Add four more shakes of salt.


Almond Butter

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 3 cups Almonds
  • ½ cup Whey
  • Filtered Water
  • Salt

instructions:

How to cook Almond Butter

  1. Place your almonds in filtered water with whey. Allow to soak for 24 hours.
  2. Drain the almonds in a colander and rinse with filtered water.
  3. Place almonds into a food processor. Pulse them consistently until you get almond butter.
  4. Once almonds are the consistency of almond butter, add four shakes of salt. Pulse for several more seconds. Add four more shakes of salt.
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DIY Almond Flour from Nuts

Any seed wants to be a plant. Seeds include nuts, seeds, beans, and grains. To protect itself, a seed has phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. These substances attack the body of the animal that ate the seed, preventing the digestion of the seed. This is why we see whole seeds in bird poop.

Manually grinding seeds into flours does nothing to negate these enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. We may not necessarily see whole seeds in our stools but we don’t need to for our bodies to experience the effects of these substances. Inflammation, poor absorption of foods, and leaky gut are some of the effects on our bodies of eating seeds that are not properly prepared. To learn more about properly preparing grains, check out my video.

HOW TO PREPARE GRAINS PROPERLY

When we properly prepare our grains however, we begin the germination process, which changes the seeds chemical structure. It neutralizes the anti-nutrients and enzyme inhibitors, and the seed prepares to bring life. When we eat a seed in this state, it’s nutrients are available to us and it brings life to our bodies.  

All seeds can be prepared in three ways - soaking, sprouting or fermenting. Fermenting is by far the most simple and the most beneficial. All it requires is whey. These directions are for almond flour but you can use the same concept to any nut, seed, or grain. For specific instructions on how to do this with whole seeds, see my recipe on trail mix.

The other benefit of using fermented almond flour is that it makes a much lighter end product. The fermentation process acts somewhat like a baking soda or powder, increasing the air space as your treat bakes, making it less dense.

This is a great way to make fermented almond flour if your recipe calls for a very specific ratio of wet to dry ingredients. It’s also great for recipes that call for frying, like these onion rings!

You can also make fermented flour with almonds already made into flour. See the recipe here.

Ingredients for Making Almond Flour from Fermented Nuts

  • 3 cups Almonds

  • ½ cup Whey

  • Filtered Water

Directions for Making Almond Flour from Fermented Nuts

Place your almonds in filtered water with whey. Allow to soak for 24 hours.

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Drain the almonds in a colander and rinse with filtered water.

For the easiest almond flour, peel the almonds by squeezing them between your fingers until the skins pop off.

Drain the almonds well. If you don’t drain them well, your flour will be wet.

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Place almonds into a food processor. Pulse them consistently for about 60 seconds in one second pulses. Scrape the sides of the food processor consistently to ensure almonds are all blended to the same size.

Don’t pulse for too long or you will get almond butter!


DIY Almond Flour

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 3 cups Almonds
  • ½ cup Whey
  • Filtered Water

instructions:

How to cook DIY Almond Flour

  1. Place your almonds in filtered water with whey. Allow to soak for 24 hours.
  2. Drain the almonds in a colander and rinse with filtered water.
  3. For the easiest almond flour, peel the almonds by squeezing them between your fingers until the skins pop off.
  4. Drain the almonds well. If you don’t drain them well, your flour will be wet.
  5. Place almonds into a food processor. Pulse them consistently for about 60 seconds in one second pulses. Scrape the sides of the food processor consistently to ensure almonds are all blended to the same size.
  6. Don’t pulse for too long or you will get almond butter!
Created using The Recipes Generator

How to Ferment Almond Flour

Fermenting Almond Flour for Proper Digestion

Any seed wants to be a plant. Seeds include nuts, seeds, beans, and grains. To protect itself, a seed has phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. These substances attack the body of the animal that ate the seed, preventing the digestion of the seed. This is why we see whole seeds in bird poop.

Manually grinding seeds into flours does nothing to negate these enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. We may not necessarily see whole seeds in our stools but we don’t need to for our bodies to experience the effects of these substances. Inflammation, poor absorption of foods, and leaky gut are some of the effects on our bodies of eating seeds that are not properly prepared. To learn more about properly preparing grains, check out my video.

How to Prepare Grains Properly

When we properly prepare our grains however, we begin the germination process, which changes the seeds chemical structure. It neutralizes the anti-nutrients and enzyme inhibitors, and the seed prepares to bring life. When we eat a seed in this state, it’s nutrients are available to us and it brings life to our bodies.  

All seeds can be prepared in three ways - soaking, sprouting or fermenting. Fermenting is by far the most simple and the most beneficial. All it requires is whey. These directions are for almond flour but you can use the same concept to any nut, seed, or grain. For specific instructions on how to do this with whole seeds, see my recipe on trail mix.

The other benefit of using fermented almond flour is that it makes a much lighter end product. The fermentation process acts somewhat like a baking soda or powder, increasing the air space as your treat bakes, making it less dense.

Preparing fermented almond flour is quite easy. After letting it ferment for 24 hours, this base can be kept in the fridge for about a week. If you have a family that loves sweet treats, this is a food that you can keep on hand at all times to create a quick twenty minute cookie. Fermented almond flour is a great base for many baked goods.

Ingredients for Fermented Almond Flour:

  • 2 Cups Almond Flour

  • 1/4 Cup Whey

Directions for Fermented Almond Flour

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Add almond flour to a glass bowl.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Pour whey over almond flour.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Stir to moisten. Add additional whey if needed. Flour should be moist and crumbly but not wet.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Cover and leave for 24 hours to properly ferment. During this time, your fermenting almond flour can be left with other jar ferments because it is covered.


Fermented Almond Flour

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 Cups Almond Flour
  • 1/4 Cup Whey

instructions:

How to cook Fermented Almond Flour

  1. Add almond flour to a glass bowl.
  2. Pour whey over almond flour.
  3. Stir to moisten. Add additional whey if needed. Flour should be moist and crumbly but not wet.
  4. Cover and leave for 24 hours to properly ferment. During this time, your fermenting almond flour can be left with other jar ferments because it is covered.
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Making Whey

Easy Do-It-Yourself Whey from Yogurt

Whey is the other protein in milk aside from casein. It’s only present after milk products have been cultured and it’s a live food. This liquid is teeming with good lactic acid producing bacteria (LABs.) Whey is a basic to keep on hand because it can be used to ferment flours, seeds, nuts, vegetables, or as a starter to culture other dairy.

I use homemade yogurt to make my whey but you can use store bought yogurt to make your own whey. Make sure you get a full fat, grass fed yogurt that only contains milk and cultures. It’s ok if it’s pasteurized as the culturing process adds life back to this food! Greek yogurt will not work to make whey as there is very little whey naturally in that strain of yogurt. If you are sensitive to lactose or casein, you should leave your store bought yogurt out on the counter, unopened, for an additional 12 - 24 hours to finish culturing the yogurt before you strain the whey. (Essentially making it lactose free.)

If you strain your yogurt for a long time, it becomes almost like a cream cheese substance. It’s great to add fresh herbs to and make a dip!

To speed along the straining time, stir your yogurt well before adding it to the cloth.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

I really like using the villi life culture from the Heirloom Yogurt Starter pack at Cultures for Health. Not only is it a mesophilic culture, meaning it cultures at room temperature instead of at 110 degrees like most yogurts, but it is a runnier yogurt and produces a lot of whey for my baking and fermenting needs.

I enjoy to the runniness of the ville life culture. If you don’t, simply separate some of the whey out of each batch for a thicker end product.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

The cloth I used is the single fold diaper cloth, you can purchase it at Walmart or find something similar at Cultures for Health.

It’s best to use a plastic funnel because metal can be damaging to the good bacteria inside the whey.

Whey keeps in the fridge for about six months if you’ve successfully removed most of the milk solids and strained well.

Ingredients for DIY Whey

  • 3 Cups Homemade Yogurt

Directions for DIY Whey

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Set a plastic strainer inside a large measuring cup or bowl.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Fold the cloth four times and set inside the strainer.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Pour your yogurt into the cloth.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Gather the edges of your cloth and secure with a rubber band.

Leave to sit and strain for as long as desired.

If you want to simply thicken your yogurt, leaving it for only ten minutes is fine. If you’d like to strain all the whey out to make a cream cheese, you can leave it for much longer. I often leave mine out overnight.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Once you have strained enough whey out, pour it into a clean glass jar.

Rinse your cloth well in hot water. Don’t use soap! Hang to dry.

Use your whey to ferment flours, seeds, nuts, or vegetables, or as a starter to culture other dairy. What will you use your whey for?


How to Make Whey

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 3 Cups Homemade Yogurt

instructions:

How to cook How to Make Whey

  1. Set a plastic strainer inside a large measuring cup or bowl.
  2. Fold the cloth four times and set inside the strainer.
  3. Pour your yogurt into the cloth.
  4. Gather the edges of your cloth and secure with a rubber band.
  5. Leave to sit and strain for as long as desired.
  6. If you want to simply thicken your yogurt, leaving it for only ten minutes is fine. If you’d like to strain all the whey out to make a cream cheese, you can leave it for much longer. I often leave mine out overnight.
  7. Once you have strained enough whey out, pour it into a clean glass jar.
  8. Rinse your cloth well in hot water. Don’t use soap! Hang to dry.
  9. Use your whey to ferment flours, seeds, nuts, or vegetables, or as a starter to culture other dairy. What will you use your whey for?
Created using The Recipes Generator

Swedish Gravlax Recipe

This meal is adapted from GAPS Cookbook by Dr. Natasha Campbell

This is a brined fish meal legal on GAPS stage 2. You eat little pieces, one small piece a day.

Swedish Gravlax Recipe

Ingredients for Swedish Gravlax:

  • ½ lb Fresh Wild Caught Salmon

  • Fresh Dill

  • Freshly Coarsely Ground Black Pepper

  • 4 cup Room Temperature Filtered Water

  • 1 tbsp Honey

  • 1 ½ tbsp Salt

Directions for Swedish Gravlax:

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Thinly slice the fish.

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Place fish slices into a deep tray.

Sprinkle with dill sprigs and pepper.

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Dissolve honey and salt in water to make a brine.

Pour brine over fish.

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Leave at room temperature for 1 - 1 ½ hours.

Pour the water out.

Serve on lettuce or eat alone.

Store in refrigerator and consume within two days.


Swedish Gravlax Recipe

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ lb Fresh Wild Caught Salmon
  • Fresh Dill
  • Freshly Coarsely Ground Black Pepper
  • 4 cup Room Temperature Filtered Water
  • 1 tbsp Honey
  • 1 ½ tbsp Salt

instructions:

How to cook Swedish Gravlax Recipe

  1. Thinly slice the fish.
  2. Place fish slices into a deep tray.
  3. Sprinkle with dill sprigs and pepper.
  4. Dissolve honey and salt in water to make a brine.
  5. Pour brine over fish.
  6. Leave at room temperature for 1 - 1 ½ hours.
  7. Pour the water out.
  8. Serve on lettuce or eat alone.
  9. Store in refrigerator and consume within two days.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Buckeye Cookies {GAPS Legal}

Another one of my favorite Christmas cookies are Buckeyes. These delicious cookies are traditionally peanut butter and powder sugar balls dipped in chocolate, made to look like the buckeye nut. The buckeye nut is commonly found back East, like Ohio and Michigan, where my family is originally from.

The roots for this recipe go deep in our family. Much like the Force.  

Ok, maybe not the Force (although I am excited for the new Star Wars movie that comes out this week!)

But we do make Buckeye cookies a lot. Since powdered sugar is hardly GAPS legal, I haven't had these cookies for a while either. But all that is about the change!  

Introducing GAPS legal Buckeye cookies!  

These no-bake cookies are egg free, and casein and lactose free (contains whey and butter). They are also coconut free!  

Please note that while cassava flour is not technically on the GAPS-illegal list, it is still quite starchy. These cookies should be a special treat, and consumed infrequently and in small amounts. Same with cocoa powder. And, as always, observe if YOUR body is okay with this particular food at this time. Just because something is "GAPS legal" does not give you a free pass to eat it! Pay attention to what your body is telling you. But if it's telling you that these cookies are okay for you, then by all means ENJOY THEM!!!

GAPS Legal Buckeye Cookies

Makes about 48 cookies

Ingredients:

Filling:

  • 1 cup peanut butter

  • 2 cups cassava flour

  • 8 TBS whey

  • 1/2-1 cup honey

  • 8 oz butter

  • 2 tsp vanilla

Coating:

  • 1 1/2 cup cocoa butter chips

  • 1/8 cup raw honey

  • 1 TBS cocoa powder

Directions:

Prep time: Need to start this recipe 24 hours in advance, 5 minutes prep time. Then it takes about 30-45 minutes to finish on the following day.  

Filling:

Twenty-four hours in advance: mix 1/2 cup peanut butter, 4 TBS whey, and 1 cup cassava flour together until everything is moist and crumbly. Try to eliminate as many clumps as possible. Leave on the countertop in a glass container with a lid. This is to give the legumes and cassava flour a chance to lacto-ferment. This makes them more digestible and increase the nutritional value. For more on why we should only eat nuts and seeds that have been properly prepared, watch my video on this.

After 24 hours, the mixture should look something like this...just a little more moist than what you started with the day before.

Add to this the vanilla extract, honey and 8 oz of softened butter (it's not the end of the world if you melt it, but try not to).

I used 1 cup of honey for this recipe, and to my non-sugar eating palate they are very sweet (which is the point, I suppose)! I plan to reduce the honey by about half the next time I make this. The mixture just needs to be formed into balls.

Mix well, and smooth out as many clumps as possible. You should be able to easily for this mixture into little balls.

Form the dough into 1 inch balls and place on a cookie sheet covered in parchment paper

Place the balls in the freezer to chill (about 10-15 minutes)   Next, make the coating   The most important part of making the coating is to heat things just hot enough to melt. Nothing should be cooked here! You are gently heating them up to mix. Then gradually cooling them back down again.  

Using a double boiler (or as I just discovered, my glass 2 cup measuring container fits perfectly into a medium saucepan) On low heat, melt the cacao butter chips.

When they are fully melted, turn off the heat and add the honey.

Next, stir in the cocoa powder (I recommend using a whisk to mix well.) 

Finally, remove the mixture in the top half of the double boiler to the coating is allowed to start cooling   Continue whisking the coating mixture occasionally. The honey cools faster than the cocoa butter, and you need to keep them mixed.

When the mixture is cool enough, remove the dough balls from the freezer. Stick a toothpick (or broken-off bamboo skewer in our case) into a ball and dip it into the coating. Depending on the temperature of the coating, you may need to dip more than once to achieve a satisfactory coating. After allowing the extra coating to drip off for a few moments, return the ball to the parchment paper.

Maintain the coating within a narow temperature margin. Keep the water from the lower part of your double-boiler ready. If your coating begins to cool too much, slip the top of the double-boiler back on top of the hot water for a minute or so to warm it back up (you probably don't need to turn on the heat). Do not let it cool too much or reheat it too quickly or too much—these can cause the chocolate to clump (this happened), and there's not going back from this. You would just need to start over making the coating.  

Traditionally the coating is darker than this recipe. I originally made a darker coating, but more cocoa powder required more honey, which seemed to throw everything off balance. I think this is part of why it clumped. Once you master the basics of temperature and consistency, you can try increasing the cocoa powder to darken the color. I will be doing that myself. In the meantime, even though this isn't as dark as traditional Buckeye cookies, the coating dries hard at room temperature. I'm calling that a win!

When they are all dipped to your satisfaction, use a toothpick to roll over the holes, filling them in.

There you have it! Rich, delicious Buckeye cookies.

Enjoy!


Buckeye Cookies

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

Filling:
  • 1 cup peanut butter
  • 2 cups cassava flour
  • 8 TBS whey
  • 1/2-1 cup honey
  • 8 oz butter
  • 2 tsp vanilla
Coating:
  • 1 1/2 cup cocoa butter chips
  • 1/8 cup raw honey
  • 1 TBS cocoa powder

instructions:

How to cook Buckeye Cookies

24 Hours in Advance:
  1. Twenty-four hours in advance: mix 1/2 cup peanut butter, 4 TBS whey, and 1 cup cassava flour together until everything is moist and crumbly. Try to eliminate as many clumps as possible. Leave on the countertop in a glass container with a lid. This is to give the legumes and cassava flour a chance to lacto-ferment. This makes them more digestible and increase the nutritional value. For more on why we should only eat nuts and seeds that have been properly prepared, watch my video onthis.
The Next Day:
  1. After 24 hours, the mixture should look something like this...just a little more moist than what you started with the day before.
  2. Add to this the vanilla extract, honey and 8 oz of softened butter (it's not the end of the world if you melt it, but try not to).
  3. I used 1 cup of honey for this recipe, and to my non-sugar eating palate they are very sweet (which is the point, I suppose)! I plan to reduce the honey by about half the next time I make this. The mixture just needs to be formed into balls.
  4. Mix well, and smooth out as many clumps as possible. You should be able to easily for this mixture into little balls.
  5. Form the dough into 1 inch balls and place on a cookie sheet covered in parchment paper
  6. Place the balls in the freezer to chill (about 10-15 minutes) Next, make the coating The most important part of making the coating is to heat things just hot enough to melt. Nothing should be cooked here! You are gently heating them up to mix. Then gradually cooling them back down again.
  7. Using a double boiler (or as I just discovered, my glass 2 cup measuring container fits perfectly into a medium saucepan) On low heat, melt the cacao butter chips.
  8. When they are fully melted, turn off the heat and add the honey.
  9. Next, stir in the cocoa powder (I recommend using a whisk to mix well.)
  10. Finally, remove the mixture in the top half of the double boiler to the coating is allowed to start cooling Continue whisking the coating mixture occasionally. The honey cools faster than the cocoa butter, and you need to keep them mixed.
  11. When the mixture is cool enough, remove the dough balls from the freezer. Stick a toothpick (or broken-off bamboo skewer in our case) into a ball and dip it into the coating. Depending on the temperature of the coating, you may need to dip more than once to achieve a satisfactory coating. After allowing the extra coating to drip off for a few moments, return the ball to the parchment paper.
  12. Maintain the coating within a narow temperature margin. Keep the water from the lower part of your double-boiler ready. If your coating begins to cool too much, slip the top of the double-boiler back on top of the hot water for a minute or so to warm it back up (you probably don't need to turn on the heat). Do not let it cool too much or reheat it too quickly or too much—these can cause the chocolate to clump (this happened), and there's not going back from this. You would just need to start over making the coating.
  13. Traditionally the coating is darker than this recipe. I originally made a darker coating, but more cocoa powder required more honey, which seemed to throw everything off balance. I think this is part of why it clumped. Once you master the basics of temperature and consistency, you can try increasing the cocoa powder to darken the color. I will be doing that myself. In the meantime, even though this isn't as dark as traditional Buckeye cookies, the coating dries hard at room temperature. I'm calling that a win!
  14. When they are all dipped to your satisfaction, use a toothpick to roll over the holes, filling them in.
  15. There you have it! Rich, delicious Buckeye cookies.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Zucchini Bread {GAPS legal}

Zucchini... if there is one harvest that defines summer, it's zucchini.

Zucchini is great because of its versatility: it can be used hot or cold, baked or fried, and in soups, salads, breads, or even as a noodle substitute.

Today I want to share with you a recipe for a zucchini bread that is legal on the full GAPS diet, WAPF diet, Paleo diet and Whole30. I want you to remember (and take hope in) the fact that I am not primarily a chef. I am just average in the kitchen. If I can make this, so can you! This recipe is very forgiving—so try it!

There are a couple keys to this recipe that need to be followed. Don't shortcut them...they are what make this recipe forgiving, and the bread yummy! The first key is also the first step: fermenting the almond flour. Have you eaten baked goods made of almond flour that are dense and dry? Fermenting the flour creates a lighter, fluffier end product. But that's not all! Fermenting is one of the three processes that can be used to make nuts more digestible.

For more about soaking, sprouting or fermenting, watch this video.

The other key is using sour cream (you could also substitute in a full-fat yogurt) for the fat. As a cultured food, sour cream helps make the bread lighter as well.

Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups almond flour (organic preferred)

  • 1/2 cup whey (strained from yogurt or kefir)

  • 2 cups zucchini (grated and squeezed to remove the liquid)

  • 2-3 eggs (chicken or duck)

  • 1 tsp cinnamon

  • 1/4 tsp ginger

  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg

  • 1 tsp sea salt (source)

  • 1/2 cup sour cream

  • 2/3 cup date syrup (source)

Directions

24 hours (or more) before

Mix almond flour and whey together in a bow.l Cover and set on the counter for 24 hours

This fermentation, which takes place at room temperature, will change the texture of the "flour." At the end of 24 hours you will have something that resembles dough more than wet flour. This is a base that can be used for many recipes. It will keep in the fridge about a week, so many people make this ahead of time and keep it in their fridge for future use. With this step done ahead of time, you can pull it out, add ingredients, and have a fermented baked good in about an hour.

The Next Day

Preheat the oven to 350° F Grate more than 2 cups of zucchini. The zucchini is very wet, so squeeze it dry using a cloth or towel (you can see it in the picture below).

Next, measure 2 cups of the zucchini (dry, but not compressed) and mix it into the 24 hour fermented flour. Add 2-3 eggs (it depends on the size of your egg, those pictured are duck eggs, which are larger than chicken eggs).

Mix in the rest of the ingredients (sour cream, date syrup, salt and spices).

I used date paste instead of honey because cooking honey is thought to turn the honey toxic. You can also make your own date paste in a strong blender like a Vitamix.

Pour into a greased pan (I prefer lining mine with parchment paper, but this is optional).

Bake at 350° for 45-50 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean from the middle. Wait at least 10 minutes before cutting into the bread. This allows the steam to finish the cooking progress, and will make the texture of the bread better. Add butter, and enjoy!

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Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups almond flour (organic preferred)
  • 1/2 cup whey (strained from yogurt or kefir)
  • 2 cups zucchini (grated and squeezed to remove the liquid)
  • 2-3 eggs (chicken or duck)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1 tsp sea salt (source)
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2/3 cup date syrup (source)

instructions:

How to cook Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

24 hours (or more) before
  1. Mix almond flour and whey together in a bow.l Cover and set on the counter for 24 hours
  2. This fermentation, which takes place at room temperature, will change the texture of the "flour." At the end of 24 hours you will have something that resembles dough more than wet flour. This is a base that can be used for many recipes. It will keep in the fridge about a week, so many people make this ahead of time and keep it in their fridge for future use. With this step done ahead of time, you can pull it out, add ingredients, and have a fermented baked good in about an hour.
The Next Day
  1. Preheat the oven to 350° F Grate more than 2 cups of zucchini. The zucchini is very wet, so squeeze it dry using a cloth or towel (you can see it in the picture below).
  2. Next, measure 2 cups of the zucchini (dry, but not compressed) and mix it into the 24 hour fermented flour. Add 2-3 eggs (it depends on the size of your egg, those pictured are duck eggs, which are larger than chicken eggs).
  3. Mix in the rest of the ingredients (sour cream, date syrup, salt and spices).
  4. I used date paste instead of honey because cooking honey is thought to turn the honey toxic. You can also make your own date paste in a strong blender like a Vitamix.
  5. Pour into a greased pan (I prefer lining mine with parchment paper, but this is optional).
  6. Bake at 350° for 45-50 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean from the middle. Wait at least 10 minutes before cutting into the bread. This allows the steam to finish the cooking progress, and will make the texture of the bread better. Add butter, and enjoy!
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Garden-fresh Vegetables Without the Garden

Summer is the time that vegetables shine! Many people are pulling beautiful zucchini, tomatoes, beans, peppers and greens out of their gardens. Fresh vegetables are in season, and you may find yourself desiring them more than usual. Go with it! Until the recent days of automobiles, airplanes and refrigeration, our bodies were used to getting fresh vegetables only during the short months of the growing season. Thousands of years of eating does leave an impression, and a healthy body will naturally crave more fresh fruits and vegetables in the summertime.

Side note: I have observed that people who are in a focused time of healing don't have this craving for fresh produce, and people who are needing to focus on detox can have fresh vegetable cravings year-round. That's okay, your body knows what it needs! Listen to your body's innate intelligence!

But depending on your situation, you may not have a garden, which makes fresh vegetables a little harder to come by. This is the case for me again this year. So today I thought I would share some ways to get fresh vegetables.

#1 Find a friend who gardens

Now, I am not telling you to mooch off a friend, leaving them to do all the hardwork. But many gardeners find themselves overflowing with vegetables right about now. Some of them may be happy just to see their hard work end up in a grateful stomach, while others would appreciate some help harvesting, preserving, or weeding in exchange for some produce. This is the best way to get vegetables, in my opinion. You will get to spend time in the wonderful sun, get to know your friend better, and maybe even learn a little about gardening. And nothing beats a fresh, hand-picked vegetable served up for dinner!

#2 Join a CSA

CSA stands for community supported agriculture. In a "working share," individuals come together under the leadership of the organizer and spend a set amount of time working around in a garden or farm for a share of the produce. There is usually a monetary investment as well. Most CSAs accept members only around the beginning of the year, so look for one to join for the next growing season. Some CSAs also offer a "non-working share," which allows an individual to pay only, and is a great option for those with jobs or situations that don't allow them the flexibility to work in the garden.

#3 Visit a local farmer's market

This one is an option for most people, but it can be a little tricky. Just because it's at a farmers market does not mean it was grown in a way that is different than the commercial food. That being said, there is going to be some benefit from eating local, naturally-ripened food, so don't rule it out if it's all you can get. The best way to know what you are buying is to talk to the farmers. Ask them how where they are located, and about their farm or garden. See what types of things they use for pesticides (organic food is often grown with organic pesticides), and what other farming/gardening practices they use. While it is not a guarantee, you may be able to find amazing and fresh produce, and at the same time provide support to that small local farm.

#4 Buy local produce at your grocery store

Here is Colorado, at the peak of the season, stores carry many things that are "Colorado Proud," meaning they are grown in Colorado. Not all stores label where their produce comes from, so ask your grocer which items are grown in your area, state, or in the United States. Made in the USA does not automatically make that food better, but knowledge is always power!

So there you go! Four ways to get garden-fresh produce without a garden. How about you? Where do you get your garden-fresh produce?