fat

GAPS Friendly Waffle Recipe

[et_pb_section bb_built="1"][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] Recently the idea struck me to try to make a GAPS waffle. I had made many GAPS pancakes, so I thought maybe it could be done. And it turns out... it can! It was not a simple task, however. The ratios are fairly different than a GAPS pancake... for one thing, putting in too many eggs caused it to overflow and made quite a mess. But after some trial and error I found a recipe that is delicious, and delivered consistent results (which is a big deal when cooking without flour). I was also excited to make this a dairy-free recipe (except for the whey). Unfortunately, I can't make it nut free, the almond butter is essential! I hope you enjoy them! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"]

GAPS Friendly Waffles

(makes about 8 waffle squares or 2 full-size waffles)

Batter Ingredients

  • 1 cup cooked butternut squash

  • 4 TBS fermented almond butter (see note)

  • 1 TBS melted lard

  • 2 eggs

  • ¼ tsp sea salt

Additional Ingredients

  • About ¼ cup melted lard or butter to grease the waffle iron

Tools

  • Food processor or high-powered blender

  • Waffle iron

  • Chopsticks (this is very helpful to get the waffles off in one piece)

Directions

This recipe is quick to put together if you do a little prep work first!Prep the Fermented Almond Butter: At least 24 hours in advance, ferment the almond butter. Add 2 TBS whey to 1 cup almond butter. Stir. Leave at room temperature for 24 hours. This will keep in the fridge for at least 2 weeks.Prep the Butternut Squash: Cut the butternut squash in half and place face down on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake at 350 degrees for 35-45 min until soft. Remove the squash flesh and place in a bowl. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] For the GAPS Waffles: Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend until very smooth and mixed. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.85" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/IMG_1242.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" force_fullwidth="off" show_bottom_space="on" /][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] I recommend pouring the mixture into a bag and using it like a pastry bag. The more quickly you can get the waffle batter on the iron and close the lid, the better it turns out! [/et_pb_text][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.85" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/IMG_1256.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" force_fullwidth="off" show_bottom_space="on" /][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] When everything is ready, and the waffle iron is hot, use the pastry brush to spread fat on the upper and lower waffle irons. Do this as quickly as possible.Add batter to the waffle iron, then close the lid. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.85" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/waffle-batter.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" force_fullwidth="off" show_bottom_space="on" /][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] There is a lot of moisture in this recipe, so expect a lot of steam!Wait for the green light to go on, and then another 30 seconds or soSlowly open the waffle iron. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.85" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/cooked-waffles.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" force_fullwidth="off" show_bottom_space="on" /][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] Remove the waffles from the iron, using the chopstick in the groves in any areas it is sticking.Top with fried eggs, honey, date syrup, berries, homemade whipped cream, or anything you want to! [/et_pb_text][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.85" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/IMG_1275.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" force_fullwidth="off" show_bottom_space="on" /][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] Enjoy! [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider _builder_version="3.14" /][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.14"]

GAPS Friendly Waffles

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For Waffle Batter

  • 1 cup Cooked Butternut Squash

  • 4 tbsp Fermented Almond Butter ((see note))

  • 1 tbsp Melted Lard

  • 2 Eggs

  • 1/4 tsp Sea Salt

Additional Ingredients

  • 1/4 cup Melted Lard or Butter (To Grease The Waffle Iron)

  • Food Processor

  • Waffle Iron

  • Chopsticks (Helpful in Getting the Waffles Off in One Piece)

Prep the Fermented Almond Butter

  1. At least 24 hours in advance, ferment the almond butter.

  2. Add 2 TBS whey to 1 cup almond butter. Stir.

  3. Leave at room temperature for 24 hours.

  4. This will keep in the fridge for at least 2 weeks.

Prep the Butternut Squash

  1. Cut the butternut squash in half and place face down on a baking sheet lined with parchment paper.

  2. Bake at 350 degrees for 35-45 min until soft.

  3. Remove the squash flesh and place in a bowl.

For the Waffles

  1. Combine all ingredients in a food processor and blend until very smooth and mixed.

  2. I recommend pouring the mixture into a bag and using it like a pastry bag. The more quickly you can get the waffle batter on the iron and close the lid, the better it turns out!

  3. When everything is ready, and the waffle iron is hot, use the pastry brush to spread fat on the upper and lower waffle irons. Do this as quickly as possible.

  4. Add batter to the waffle iron, then close the lid.

  5. Wait for the green light to go on, and then another 30 seconds or so

  6. Slowly open the waffle iron.

  7. Remove the waffles from the iron, using the chopstick in the groves in any areas it is sticking.

  8. Top with fried eggs, honey, date syrup, berries, homemade whipped cream, or anything you want to!

There is a lot of moisture in this recipe, so expect a lot of steam!

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Is Fat a Better Prescription for Mental Illness?

[et_pb_section bb_built="1"][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] Shootings, bombings and gun control are often in the news these days. There are many different opinions and views on this, but one thing that I do not think is getting enough attention is the mental stability of the perpetrator. It makes sense that mental illness is involved, but many people have a diagnosis of mental illness and don't carry out violent crimes. What's the difference? I think we need to look closer to try to find out what causes a person to carry out a violent crime?  

Here is my hypothesis for testing:

What connection do diet and the use of anti-psychotic drugs have to do with these unprovoked acts of violence?

  Could it be that we are prescribing the wrong treatment for mental illness?   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"]

What diet has to do with the brain:

  The gray matter of the brain is made up of an estimated 50% fatty acids. Our hormones and neurotransmitters are partially composed of lipids, and lipids are needed for several different cellular functions, including neuron growth and signaling, cell movement, and lymphocyte activation (2). If lipids and cholesterol are involved in so many aspects of brain function, doesn’t it make sense that a low-fat diet would cause brain function problems? If it is fat deficiency that is causing the disease, then we would expect the results of a treatment that addresses down-line symptom (chemical imbalance) rather than the root cause (fat deficiency) would have limited effectiveness.

Isn’t that what we are observing?

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] Only a percentage of people who take medications for anxiety or depression see improvement. When Consumer Reports asked 1,386 people who took medications for anxiety, depression, or both (SSRIs, SNRIs, Bupropion), they found that 48-53% people said it helped a lot, and 35-38% said it helped somewhat, and in each grouping 13-15% of people said it helped less than somewhat (or none) (1).

If depression and anxiety were caused by a simple chemical imbalance, shouldn’t we see a much higher response rate to treatment?

Not only are these medications largely ineffective, but they also come with a high risk of side effects. When the same group (above) were surveyed, 12-31% of those people experienced one or more side effect: loss of sexual interest or ability, weight gain, dry mouth, or sleep problems (1). That means up to 1/3 of the people on these medications experience side effects! And they may not even see any benefit from them! Other side effects listed for these medications are nervousness, agitation or restlessness, headache, blurred vision, dizziness, dry mouth, digestive system problems (4, 5). Bupropion is listed to have the additional potential side effects include: trouble concentrating, hyperventilation, irregular heartbeats, irritability, paranoia, hallucinations, seizures, fainting, anger, assaulting others, being aggressive or impulsive, actions that are out of control, inability to sit still, or talking, feeling or acting with excitement (3). That’s a scary list! And don’t some of them sound familiar in light of the shootings? [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"]

Avoiding the side effects:

  Finally, talk alone may be as (if not more) effective than medications. A survey of 1,544 people showed that talk therapy alone was as much, if not more successful than a medication treatment (1). So... maybe medications aren’t the answer? Then what is? What if we correct the underlying imbalance? What if we prescribe a diet high in the building blocks needed for the brain? This includes omega-3 and -6, but also cholesterol and saturated fats from animals, which are necessary for our cell membranes and other parts of our brain and nervous system.

Put simply, we need fat because fat:
  • Balances hormones
  • Helps make “happy” neurotransmitters
  • Is necessary for mentation (thinking)
  • Is a needed part of the myelin sheath (fast nerve impulses)
  • Decreases inflammation
  • Help in brain damage repair
  • Detoxifies the body and brain
  • Feeds and supports the immune system
  • Is used in every cell of the body
  • And more!

  When we look at a tragedy like a shooting, there are many factors at play. But how many of those factors are related to the balance and health of the shooter’s body? If, as an old advertisement stated “They’re happy because they eat butter!” then perhaps a lack of saturated fat in the diet is a large contributor to the unimaginable mental state of people who treat human life so carelessly. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"]

Eat more fat!

This is why the first and most important thing I recommend is to eat more fat! Animal fat, specifically. If you have prescribed to the low-fat diet for a while, or had your gallbladder removed, you need to increase your fat consumption gradually, and perhaps look at supplementing with something like ox bile during your transition. Work up until you are eating at least ½ cup of added animal fat a day. This includes children—they have fast-growing bodies and brains!

Common sources of animal fat are:
  • Butter and ghee
  • Sour cream (crème fraische)
  • Lard (rendered pig fat)
  • Tallow (rendered beef, buffalo, elk, deer fat)
  • Chicken, duck, goose, etc fat
  • Bacon (not turkey bacon!)

  You can eat much more than ½ cup a day! Just listen to what your body is asking for. And to learn more about why we should eat fat alongside every food group, check my The One About Fat post.

What do you think?

  References:

  1. Consumer Reports. (July 2010). Best Antidepressant for Anxiety According to Our Readers: Readers Revealed the Therapists and Drugs that Helped. https://www.consumerreports.org/cro/2013/01/depression-and-anxiety/index.htm
  2. Ding, Z. and Zajac, J.-M.. (2016). Cholesterol-rich lipid rafts are involved in neuropeptide FF anti-nociceptin/orphanin FQ effect. J. Neurochem., 136:778-790. Doi:10.1111/jnc.13450

  Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Your trust is important to me. I only recommend products I trust. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

New Year's Resolutions: Six Habits I Recommend on a Regular Basis

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Happy New Year everyone!

In the last post, I shared about mindsets to have (or not) that will help with successful habit change. This week I want to share about some of the habits I think are most important to consider integrating into your family. This is not an exhaustive list! These habits are simple and sound. They are not flashy or trendy (necessarily), and they have stood the test of time. And remember, I am not suggesting you start ALL of these habits at once, or that these are the highest priority for your family. I am merely suggesting ones I think are important. For your consideration. Here they are:  

Six Habits I Recommend on a Regular Basis:

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Eat More Animal Fat

This is my number one recommendation, and it is something you can incorporate into your food right now! Everyone should be eating more animal fat! Here's a post about why you should add more animal fat to your diet. Animal fats are butter, lard, tallow, ghee, chicken, duck and goose fat, bacon, and sour cream. This is where the money is! But what about avocados, coconut oil, and all the "healthy fats"? Those fats are fine and healthy (if they are good quality), but they cannot replace the amazing benefits that animal fats bring to your body. Those fats are fine to eat, but focus on increasing the animal fats. I recommend people work up to eating a minimum of 1/2 cup added animal fat per person per day. This includes children (they need fat for their developing brain!) This can be accomplished by adding fat to everything! Fry everything in butter, lard or bacon grease. Butter your steak! Eat butter cubes and dried fruit for a snack. Eat a tub of sour cream with a spoon! These are just some ideas to get you started. And if you are worried about fat and heart disease or obesity, I recommend you check out the book by Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride called Put Your Heart in Your Mouth, which explains the real reason for these epidemic diseases.

Drink Meat Stock Daily

Meat stock (not necessarily bone broth) is a liquid gold that I think every person can benefit from. To learn how to make it, view my post about it. I recommend that every person (children included) consume at least 1 mug of meat stock every day. With every meal is even better. This doesn't have to be in the form of soup—it can be a mug of the strained stock. And this is great place to add in extra fat (see previous point). And yes, there is a difference between store-bought and homemade—you can make something of infinitely higher quality than anything you can buy. And please, even if you use a microwave for other things, warm up your meat stock on the stove!

Eat a Fermented Food

Until the age of refrigeration, we naturally had some time of fermented food at least once a day. Either foods were fermented on purpose to preserve them longer (like sauerkraut), or during the course of a few days stored at room temperature, they grew some amount of mold, yeast, or bacteria on them. Today, food in this state goes instantly into the trash (often container included), but for most of history food was rarely wasted due to a little mold! Now, I am not saying you should eat food that is molded or rotten, but our bodies function in a more healthy state if we regularly eat microbes. After all, a large part of our bodies are microbes! Here is a fun little video about how microbes work in your body. To help your body get or stay healthy, it's good to get these healthy microbes in us! You can do this by taking a probiotic, or eating fermented foods. There are different reasons why one is better than the other, and sometimes both are needed, but eating a ferment (or fermented food) is a great way to start out! You can buy your ferment (like live, refrigerated sauerkraut), or make it yourself. In addition to sauerkraut, beet kvass and vegetable medley are two of my favorites. When you start with any probiotic or fermented food, go slowly! Too much too fast can cause what's known as a die-off or Herx reaction. This is not fun, but can be avoided by increasing the amount you eat slowly! Start with one bite of sauerkraut, or 1 ounce of beet kvass. See how you feel for the next 24 hours, then use that as a guide to let you know how fast you can increase (or if you need to decrease).   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="detox changes" _builder_version="3.0.85" background_layout="light"] The last three habits are related to detoxing and cleansing your body.

Filter Your Water

This is a fairly simple change to make, yet it can reap large benefits. City water, most bottled water, and some well water contains chlorine in one or more forms. It is put there to keep species of bacteria, fungus and other microbes from multiplying to unhealthy levels. However, when we drink this same water the chlorine negatively affects the flora living inside us as well. And when we bathe and shower in it, not only do the chemicals dry out our skin and the fumes irritate our lungs, the protective barrier of our skin (maintained by skin flora) is damaged. You can largely prevent all of these things by filtering the chlorine (and some other things) out of your water. There are many levels of filters, and depending on how sick you are and what's in your water supply, a stronger filter may be necessary. But most people see benefit with simple filters for their drinking, cooking and bathing water. I use this filter or this filter for my drinking and cooking water, this filter for my baths, and this filter for my shower. You could get them all, or start with one and build from there.

Take a Detox Bath

A detox bath is an excellent way to help your body get rid of toxins that have accumulated there. There are three factors in a detox bath: water temperature, time, and amount of detox material. You can adjust all three of these to find your perfect bath! Common detoxing materials are Epsom salt, baking soda, and raw apple cider vinegar with the mother. And as we just discussed, dechlorinated water is preferred. The goal of a detox bath is to make you feel lighter, clearer and better. If you go too high on any of the three detox bath factors, you may get nauseated, a headache, increased heart rate, brain fog, muscle cramps, irritability or other like symptoms. If this happens during your bath, no worries! Just get out of the bath right away, drink plenty of water, and your symptoms will usually disappear in a few minutes. If they don't, lie down for a little while to let your body rest and recover.

  • Water temperature: you want a warm bath, but if it gets really hot, your body can jump to that other level of detoxing that will give you all the undesirable symptoms. This temperature will be determined by you, and may vary slightly day by day.
  • Time in the bath: to detox, most people need to stay in the bath about 20 minutes. You can stay in longer. But sometimes staying in more time can cause you to start having symptoms. If that happens, bath time is over! It's time to get out! Shorten your bath time by a few minutes the next time.
  • Amount of detoxing materials: for each bath, you want to use one of the detox materials listed above. Amounts vary between 1/4-1 cup. Test and see what works for you. It's good to rotate the material, using all three at different times, for a more comprehensive detoxing.

Enjoy your bath!

Walk Outside in the Sun

This is actually a two-for-one! Sunbathing (with nothing on your skin) is a great way to detox AND increase your levels of vitamin D. Of course, different seasons will have a different influence on vitamin D levels, but talking a walk in the sunshine has undeniable benefits (and probably ones we don't even understand yet!) The full light spectrum can help fight daytime fatigue, which in turn helps our hormones to balance. And you are getting gentle movement exercise on top of it! This will stimulate blood flow and increase your body's ability to remove toxins, as well as stimulate lymph movement, which does the same. It's important to expose your skin to the sun without any barrier, including light barriers such as coconut oil. Commercial sunscreens should be avoided altogether as they contain many known carcinogens. If your skin is not ready for the amount of sun exposure it's going to get, it's best to cover up with clothing, and/or gradually work up the time in the sun. As a side benefit, the more animal fat you eat the less likely you are to sunburn! So use this winter wisely! By the time spring and summer come, you should be able to increase your sun time gradually without problems! And yes, this includes you blondes, redheads, and fair-skinned people! So there you have it! The top six changes I recommend on a regular basis. Let me know which one you tried out first, and how it went!

Onward!

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Living in an Epic

[et_pb_section bb_built="1"][et_pb_row][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.77" background_layout="light" border_style="solid"] I love epics! When I read, watch or listen to a story that shows gives me a glimpse or sniff of the epic, there is something inside me that reaches deep, finds courage, or gathers strength to face whatever I am facing in my life. Or reminds me that my life is pretty easy... that happens too.   Is this just me?   Anyone else?   I know that epics help me so much in my everyday life, so I try to put them in my everyday (or at least a few times a week) life.*

*This may be re-reading an number of books (the Lord of the Rings series, Narnia series, The Seeker series, The Space Trilogy, The Inheritance Cycle, various biographies of missionaries or historical figures, or even The Little House on the Prairie series (especially The Long Winter). It may also be from thinking about Epics I have read (at least in part) in the past, like the Odyssey and Illiad. It may also be from watching the movies that go with these books. It is not unusual for me to be reading one or another of the books in this list, along with health or business books I am reading. (Right now I am at chapter seven of LOTR: The Two Towers.)

  Today I want to share some reflections that I have concerning epics. Maybe you've thought about or experienced some of these things before, and maybe you haven't. But I believe that there is something inside each of us that responds to the essence of an epic tale. And I think there is good that can come from that response.  

One of my epics-of-choice is Lord of the Rings. While I do enjoy and watch the movies, the books give a deeper picture, a chance to immerse with the characters and experience what they are experiencing as they journey in the race against evil.

I've lost count of how many times I've re-read this series, but each time I read through it, there is something that soothes my heart, makes me feel understood (or helps me understand something), or gives me a different perspective. (I think this happens because each time I read it I am in a different place—I am experiencing something new or in a different way, or I have learned more.)

  But the personal strengthening I get from reflecting on these epic tales generally falls into one of three categories.     #1 Your story is important!Each of us have a story (or journey). And that story (journey) is important. Frodo may seem to be the star in the Lord of the Rings, but there are multiple stories involving different characters that are interwoven (at times) with each other. And in most cases, if the characters in those other stories did not act courageously, or if they had made a different choice, perhaps the great and evil Sauron would not have been overthrown. Every person is important:

  • Without Sam's support Frodo would have never made it

  • Without Merry and Pippin's appearance Isenguard would still be standing

  • Without Eowyn's care for her people Theoden could not have gone to war

  • Without Bilbo's gift Frodo would have been skewered by a troll in Moria

  And there are so many more examples! While the comparison isn't (of course) exact (as far as I know, there are no trolls), each of us something important that only we can do with our lives. And what we choose to do (and that we don't give up) affects others in ways you may never know. You are important! Your life is significant, no matter how it feels. I mean, most of what Frodo did was walk! But would anyone say his part was insignificant?     [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.77" background_layout="light" border_style="solid"]

#2 There is a bigger picture!

So many times I am just putting one foot in front of the other. One more morning that I got out of bed. Several meals cooked and eaten. Another work day finished. A detox bath done. Lights out. I need epics to remind me of the bigger picture! As you read or watch any epic tale in which great deeds are done, I challenge you to pay attention to the timeline.

  • How many miles did that person walk before they found adventure?

  • How many days at sea before they found the next island?

  • How many years of study before they became a Plato?

  • How many failed experiments before they invented the lightbulb?

  I never used to notice the timeline. And I was always frustrated that my big break hadn't come yet, or that I was still in school, or that I wasn't where I wanted to be in any number of areas in my life. Then I started to read phrases like "they traveled 2 weeks" or "he studied that language for 5 years." And I realized I was missing something. I want to achieve the great thing now. I want to be done with the journey now. But that's not how it usually works (really, almost never!). Even "The Greats" did not become great in one night, or many. Years and years of hard work are often represented by a single sentence in their biographies. Because most of life's achievements are accomplished in the mundane. But those steps, mile after mile, are what prepare you for your great moment. And one day each of those steps will be the accomplishment of a journey. And one day you will probably notate all these hard years with a single sentence as well.    

#3 You are not alone!

It is common to feel isolated. Most people do (about 72% of Americans, according to a study done in 2016). We see loneliness in epic tales as well.

  • Frodo felt he had to make the journey to Mordor alone.

  • Aragon felt alone when Gandalf fell in Moria.

  • Merry and Pippin felt alone when they were captured by orcs.

  • Gimli felt alone when he was grieving Balin's death in Moria.

  • Gandalf felt alone when he was betrayed by Saruman the White.

  You may argue. "You don't know my life. I am alone." I believe you! I believe that you feel alone! But that does not mean you are, or that you have to be. Frodo thought he had to go to Mordor alone (and tried to), but it was right and good that Sam went with him. Here are two reasons why you are not alone.

First:

You have people around you who love you. People who care about you and would miss you if you were gone. They may be bad at expressing it, but I KNOW you have at least one person in your life that cares. Because if you truly can't think of anyone else who cares about you, I care about you!

Also, there is another person who cares about you, and He cares way more than I ever can. His name is Jesus, and He died for you. I know He cares about you because He also cares about me. He has helped me and loved me in amazing, real ways! If you want to know more about Him and how He loves you, please reach out to me. (I also share some more about it in this post on hope.) 

 

Second:

You are not alone because your experience of loneliness is something that we all experience. Everyone you know has experienced or is currently experienced loneliness in their lives. And while we may not get to hear the story of those around you (although I encourage you to ask), we can see this common human experience reflected in the epic tales. The reason why epics resound so strongly with our spirits is because we know that we too are part of an epic tale. We alone can feel the true weight of a burden, feel the exhilaration of our victories, or the crushing weight of fear or feeling alone. We are the only ones who can walk each of the steps of our journey.   But we don't have to do it alone! At each step along the way there are companions. They may not be the ones you would choose (Frodo and Sam did not want Gollum to be with them, but they needed him). Some are only for a season (like the Fellowship), and others stay with you until the end (like Sam with Frodo). Look around you. Who do you have next to you? Who may be your companions right now? I know how it is to feel alone. I have felt alone most of my life. I know that it takes tremendous courage to reach out. To get to know the people around you. To risk getting close to them even though you may get hurt. To initiate relationship again and again. But everyone feels alone and scared. Everyone is hoping for a friend to go through life with. But someone has to take the first step. And not everyone you reach out to will be your Sam, but someone may be. And maybe you will be a Sam to them. But you won't know unless you try.   It takes courage to live in an epic. Dangers are near and frequent. Patience and long-suffering are needed. But only in an epic is the victory so notable, and success so sweet, and the ending make you cry with joy. And only when I view my journey as an epic tale can I bring into perspective the hard things in my life. For I know deep down inside that I was created for something great! Something eternal! Something magnificent! Can you feel it too?   Our lives are epics. That means there will be wonderful things and horrible things that happen in them. But isn't it good to know you are in an epic? Then you aren't surprised at what you find around the next bend.   So take courage! And journey,  

Onward!

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Immunity: The Best Defense is a Good Offense {Part Two}

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Last time we talked about the first two ways to support your body's immunesystem. In review, there are four ways or areas we can strengthen our immune system.

  • Eat a diet rich in nourishing foods
  • Support the good microbes in your body and environment
  • Detoxify to give the inflammatory arm of the immune system a break
  • Use essential oils and herbs to support your body's natural defenses

To read about the first two on the above list, check out the previous blog HERE. Today we are going to discuss the other ways you can prepare your body to be ready for environmental attacks. This is a longer post. Hang in there, and bookmark this so you can come back to it for reference.   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"]

Detoxify Your Body

Detoxification may not automatically come to mind when you think about supporting your body's immune system, but a high toxin level in your body can lead to an overwork of your immune system. How? Toxins that are loose in the body cause damage to tissues, interfere with hormones and neurotransmitters, and in other ways increase the overall inflammation in the body. This is not a problem when it is happening on a small scale—in fact, our body was designed to handle this very thing—but when the toxins increase, so does the damage. This means that inflammation (a branch of the immune system) has to become more and more active to address the increase of damage from toxins. The more active it becomes, the more resources it needs. The "resources" of the immune system are nutrients (like cholesterol, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin C, zinc, etc.), energy from metabolic production, and different (specific) immune cells. Many of the same resources are needed both to fight infection and to deal with inflammation. So if toxin damage is high, causing increasing inflammation, then the resources will be directed to the inflammatory branch with the purpose of reducing inflammation. This is good, until a pathogenic microbe decides to invade the body. Then the infection branch of the immune system finds itself understaffed and under-resourced. Without enough resources to fight off the invaders quickly and efficiently, the immune system does the best it can, but it often takes a longer time to restore the body to health and balance. Sometimes the immune system cannot remove the invading threat, and that microbe finds a "corner" to take up residence in. If this happens, these microbes stay in the body and put a constant, low-level drain on the immune system that is constantly fighting to keep them in check. And when the immune system is weakened, these microbes may surface, causing more obvious and acute symptoms.

You can help your immune system out by detoxing.

A simple way to support your immune system is by reducing the amount of toxins, which then reduces the amount of inflammation in the body. There are some simple ways to detoxify your body. Walk in the sunshine!

Sunshine (on unprotected skin) initiates detox through one of your body's normal pathways for detox. Getting enough sun can be challenging in the colder months, but try to expose as much skin as possible, depending on the weather. And you will be able to stay outside longer if you are moving! And movement is not just about staying warm: when your muscles are worked your lymphatic system pumps stronger, as does your heart, which also help your body to remove the toxins.

Drink plenty of water!

I am not a huge fan of the "8 glasses of water every day" rule, because each individual body is going to have different water needs at different times, and this will likely change several times a day. Sometimes 8 glasses are too many, and sometimes it is not enough! Listen to your body to know what "enough water" means. To get you started, enough water means that your urine is pale yellow and does not have an odor, your lips are not dry, and you are not thirsty. When detoxing, it's very important to drink enough water to allow the body to flush the toxins from the body.

Get enough sleep!

Did you know that your body does most of its detoxing and repairing while you are sleeping? And this is not just sleeping whenever... actually your body heals the body more before midnight than after. In the words of Joseph Antell, a Clinical Nutritionalist and a Certified Herbalist, "Every hour [of sleep] before midnight is worth two hours after midnight in terms of healing..." So get to bed! Your body needs to rest. If you have problems sleeping, which is common in many health conditions, doing things like detoxing, eating nutrient-dense foods, turning off WiFi and leaving electronic devices out of the bedroom, and using natural sleep remedies like essential oils, herbs, or even a warm bath or warm milk can help your body get into a pattern of sleeping.

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Support the Body's Natural Defenses

Sometimes our body needs some extra help. Maybe you just started eating nutrient-dense foods. Maybe your body's defenses were weakened by a stressful day, or not enough sleep. Maybe the microbe that is trying to invade is especially strong, or one your body hasn't seen before. Or maybe your body is doing a fine job fighting off the invaders, but it will appreciate any outside help you can give it. When you feel sick, do all the things we have talked about so far. Drink lots of meat stock. Avoid sugar, even from fruit. Double up on your fermented cod liver oil dose. Get lots of sleep and drink plenty of water. You can go out in the sun if it is sunny, not too cold or windy, and you are well wrapped (including your head and neck). In addition to all these, there are things provided in nature that support our bodies through the natural course of being sick. This is a large topic in itself, and today I will just introduce some of these to you.  

Foods:
  • Candied Onion: Cook in lots of butter, ghee or lard, then topped with a fried egg boosts the immune system and soothes a sore throat
  • Fermented Garlic (or raw): Raw or fermented garlic boost the immune system and can kill some pathogenic microbes
  • Honey: Raw, unfiltered honey has immune-supporting properties and is effective as a cough suppressant
  • Unpasteurized milk: Raw milk contains the active form of calcium (calcium lactate), which kills pathogens. Will help reduce a fever

This is not an exhaustive list of food!

Essential Oils:
  • Lavender: This is an antihistamine, so it will help calm inflammation from allergies or invading microbes
  • Oregano: This is a powerful antibacterial. It is a very hot oil, and should always be diluted with a carrier oil if applied to the skin
  • Protective blend: This is a blend of essential oils with antimicrobial properties, like clove, eucalyptus, and rosemary. It also supports the body's natural immune system
  • Respiratory blend: This blend contains things like eucalyptus, peppermint and lemon, which help to open up the airways and sinuses
  • Tea Tree: This has antiviral and anti-fungal properties, and can be helpful to support the body in fighting these types of infections
  • Many other essential oils support the body in a particular circumstances, but they are too specific to write about here

Important Note: I only recommend therapeutic grade essential oils. Essential oils bought at a health food store, or Walmart, and likely synthetic, diluted, and/or manipulated. To find out about the essential oils I recommend, and how to purchase them, click HERE.  

Other Options:
  • Flower essences (work with a practitioner or look in reference books)
  • Food-based supplements (like Acerola Cherry Powder, Indian Gooseberry, Calcium Lactate, etc.)
  • Herbs and tinctures (including Elderberry syrup, Echinacea, etc)
  • Homeopathic remedies (work with a homeopath or look in reference books)

  [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] As you can see, there are many specific ways you can support your body's immune system, both before an infection, and during one. Every body responds a little differently, so try different tools to see what works best for you and the members of your family. But don't forget to start with the basics! If the immune system doesn't have enough resources or immune cells, or if the body is overwhelmed by inflammation, or if you aren't drinking enough water for things to move quickly, additional support can only help you so much in your sickness. And don't get overwhelmed with how much you could do! Just pick one thing and start doing it. Then keep going, and keep learning. You are going to do great! Onward!   This post contains affiliate links. Your trust is important to me, and I only recommend products that I trust. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Immunity: The Best Defense is a Good Offense {Part One}

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.50"] Fall is coming! I hope you have been enjoying the cooler nights (and sometimes day) like I have! The onset of cooler weather also means that cold and flu season is coming! Is your immune system ready? We often respond to illnesses defensively... waiting until we catch something before we take care of it. But there is another way... a way to go on the offensive and give your immune system a running start! The food we eat (or don't eat), our obsession with cleanliness, the frequency medications are prescribed, and the environmental toxins we are exposed to can lead to our bodies being run down, and our immune systems functioning below peak performance level. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.50"] In fact, it's pretty amazing that we have any immunity left! I'm thankful for the incredibly complex design of our bodies, which allows them to compensate and continue working, even in sub-optimal conditions. Here is a fun video that explains the workings of the immune system. But doesn't it seem like a good idea to support our bodies—and our immune systems—the best that we can? The good news is that there are ways to support our immune systems!  

  • Eat a diet rich in nourishing foods
  • Support the good microbes in your body and environment
  • Detoxify to give the inflammatory arm of the immune system a break
  • Use essential oils and herbs to support your body's natural defenses

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Today let's talk about the first two, and next time we will talk about the other two.  

Nourishing Foods

Eating nourishing foods is a topic I talk about often. If you haven't heard much of what I have to say about this yet, you can check out some other posts like this one and this one. Today I'm going to share with you the nutrient dense foods that your immune system LOVES! Your immune system is a very hungry organ. It is overseeing the entire body, and needs lots of little soldiers to work properly. For a strong, well-staffed immune system, the body needs to be well supplied with cholesterol, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin C, zinc, and more. These nutrients can be found in the same nutrient dense foods that I am always recommending... meat stock, butter, fermented cod liver oil (source), liver (you can get it in a capsule), caviar, egg yolks, full-fat yogurt or kefir, grass-fed beef, and some others. Important minerals can be found in whole salts (sources). When these types of foods are consumed on a regular basis, the immune system will have enough building blocks to make itself strong. While you are increasing the amount of nutrient-dense foods you are eating, it's a good idea to decrease the amount of empty, processed foods you eat. These foods are mostly empty calories, and any food that contains processed sugar depresses the immune systems for hours after it's eaten. As you fill up with real, whole foods, phase any sugar-containing, processed food out of your diet.   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"]

Support Good Microbes

Another reason why our immune systems are struggling is because we have declared a war on microbes. Since the days of Louis Pasteur we have been sterilizing and pasteurizing everything in sight. Even if you don't take antibiotics, you are still getting exposed to them through the food you eat, the water you drink, and often even the soap you wash your hands with. Additionally we obsessively use hand sanitizer, bleach and other cleaners that kill 99.9% of germs. But these sanitizers aren't just killing germs. They are killing the good microbes as well—microbes that keep balance, and even health, to our bodies and the world around us. Another theory emerged around the time of Pasteur, and with our growing knowledge of the human microbiome, it seems to be the more true of the two. Antoine Bechamp created the cellular theory, with the main hypothesis that it is the environment that causes disease, not the germ. A short recap of these two theories can be found here. If Pastuer were right, then our bodies should do better and better as we "cleanse" and reduce the number of bacteria and other microbes. But we have found that the opposite is true. Research has shown that those people with fewer species of microbes in their gut are actually more prone to illness and disease, including chronic disease like obesity, autoimmunity and cancer. So stop killing things! Get rid of your antimicrobial soap and Clorox spray! When you need to clean your hands, wash them instead of sanitizing. And expose yourself to the good and helpful microbes that help keep the bad ones in check. you can do this by eating fermented foods, taking a probiotic, and getting into the dirt sometimes. Eating the nourishing foods we talked about will also support helpful microbes in your body. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] That should get you started, but come back to learn about the other two ways you can support your immune system. Remember, the best defense is a good offense! Onward! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Lovely Lard

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Eating animal fat is important to our body's health. But eating enough fat can be challenging, especially when there is a dairy allergy. Lard is a great alternative to butter, and its taste is more mild than that of tallow. You can buy lard at the store, but it is expensive and may be hydrogenated or of poor quality. Making your own lard is simple and easy, and can be done for a fraction of the price. To make lard, you first start out with pig fat. This can be obtained from a butcher, or even trimmed off of fatty cuts of pork like the Boston butt. The process of turning fat into lard or tallow is called rendering. In this post I describe rendering lard, but the process for rendering tallow (which is fat from beef, bison, deer, lamb, or elk) is the same, although for tallow it may take a few more hours.   There are two kinds of pig fat. Leaf fat is from fat surrounding the internal organs. It is very mild in taste and used to be reserved for making pies and pastries. Body fat is from the layer of fat beneath the skin. This has a slightly stronger pork taste, and is better used in cooking meat and vegetables. Along with a different taste, there is a different look to the two types of fat. Body fat is in large pieces, and appears more dense and flat. Leaf fat is in smaller pieces, has a fluffier texture, and may contain membranes. The fat you get from a butcher may contain both types of fat. If that is the case, I recommend separating out the two types of fat and rendering them separately so you can use them for different purposes. However, there is no problem in mixing them and rendering them together. (The fat I have pictured below is leaf fat.)  

Making Lard:

First, cut up the pig fat into small 1-2 inch sized cubes. If using leaf fat, remove as much membrane as possible. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Pig-Fat.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Put the fat cubes in a medium saucepan on low heat. You may use a crockpot, but it must have a very low setting or the fat will burn. Stir occasionally and watch closely. Don't let the lard smoke! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Fat-Starting-Out.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] With time, the solid pieces of fat will get smaller, and the liquid will increase. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Rendering-Fat.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] After a few hours, when the lard is liquified, set up your strainer and cloth. Below you see pictured a jar, jar funnel, and metal strainer. Metal is best because the lard is hot! To finish it off, place a cloth. You can use an old napkin or other cloth, or several layers of cheesecloth. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Straining-Equipment.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Straining-Cloth.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Pour the liquid into the strainer. The liquid will go into the jar and the cracklings will stay in the cloth. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Straining-the-lard.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Squeeze the rest of the liquid out of the cracklings. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Sqeezing-Fat.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Cracklings separated from the liquid lard. Salt and fry these. You can eat them like bacon bits, or just plain. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Cracklings.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Allow the jar of lard to cool on the counter. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Liquid-Lard.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] When the lard is cool you can move it to the fridge, or leave it on the counter. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_image _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/09/Cool-Lard.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" animation_style="none" animation_duration="1000ms" animation_intensity_slide="50%" show_bottom_space="on" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] If you are careful not to contaminate the jar, the lard will last for several months, even left out at room temperature. Use the lard in your cooking— it is a wonderful thing to fry up vegetables or meat and add fat to your diet. Bon appétit! Onward! [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider _builder_version="3.14" /][et_pb_text _builder_version="3.14"]

Homemade Lard

Lovely-Lard-150x150.jpg
  • Pig Fat

  1. Cut up the pig fat into small 1-2 inch sized cubes. If using leaf fat, remove as much membrane as possible.

  2. Put the fat cubes in a medium saucepan on low heat. You may use a crockpot, but it must have a very low setting or the fat will burn.

  3. Stir occasionally and watch closely. Don’t let the lard smoke!

  4. With time, the solid pieces of fat will get smaller, and the liquid will increase.

  5. After a few hours, when the lard is liquefied, set up your strainer and cloth. A metal strainer is best because the lard is hot! To finish it off, place a cloth. You can use an old napkin or other cloth, or several layers of cheesecloth.

  6. Pour the liquid into the strainer. The liquid will go into the jar and the cracklings will stay in the cloth.

  7. Squeeze the rest of the liquid out of the cracklings.

  8. Salt and fry the cracklings. You can eat them like bacon bits, or just plain.

  9. Allow the jar of lard to cool on the counter. When the lard is cool you can move it to the fridge, or leave it on the counter.

  10. If you are careful not to contaminate the jar, the lard will last for several months, even left out at room temperature.

There are two kinds of pig fat. Leaf fat is from fat surrounding the internal organs. It is very mild in taste and used to be reserved for making pies and pastries. Body fatis from the layer of fat beneath the skin. This has a slightly stronger pork taste, and is better used in cooking meat and vegetables.

Along with a different taste, there is a different look to the two types of fat. Body fat is in large pieces, and appears more dense and flat. Leaf fat is in smaller pieces, has a fluffier texture, and may contain membranes. The fat you get from a butcher may contain both types of fat. If that is the case, I recommend separating out the two types of fat and rendering them separately so you can use them for differentpurposes. However, there is no problem in mixing them and rendering them together.

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The Lost Art of Reheating Food without a Microwave

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Microwaves, advertised to be "the greatest cooking discovery since fire," can be found in almost every American home. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"]   And I recommend that you never use one! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/No-Microwaves.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] There are many reasons why microwaves should be avoided (read:  remove them from your house), including lost nutrition, creation of free radicals and carcinogens, and radiation leakage. These effects are well documented in studies. If you are interested in researching this more, try starting with this article and it's references. But today we are not going to debate the safety of microwaves, but bring back the lost art of reheating food without a microwave. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] When I first decided to ditch my microwave I had to experiment with reheating food. Before that moment I don't think I had ever reheated food outside of a microwave. I had a lot to learn. But that was years ago, and reheating food without a microwave is second-nature to me now... I don't have to think about it. Today I want to share with you what I've learned, so you too can practice this lost art. Choosing which reheat method to use depends on several factors, but in reality, there is more than one way to reheat a dish! With practice you will be choosing your reheating option without thinking about it. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"]

Basic reheating options are:
  • Stove-top (pan)
  • Stove-top (skillet)
  • Oven
  • Toaster oven
  • Slow cooker

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Pot-on-Stove.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" custom_margin_last_edited="off|tablet" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] The method that you choose depends on what you want to reheat, how much time you have, what options you have available, and how hot your house is already (this is a real consideration for me in the summertime because I do not have central air). Again, with time you will figure out which methods work for you. There are no wrong answers—just ones that work better than others.  

Use these guidelines to get started:
  • Keep the heat low: high heat = greater risk of dry, burnt food
  • Cover the food to retain moisture
  • Use a steamer basket to reheat vegetables or pasta
  • Add a little water or fat if your food is dry
  • Reheat your food in animal fat (bonus: this adds to the nutrition)
  • For larger amounts a slow, covered reheat in the oven is efficient
  • Use a toaster oven or oven to make food crispy
  • When bringing food to a party in a slow cooker, heat before leaving
  • Reheat in a slow cooker using the medium or high (not warm) setting
  • Place glass jars of frozen soup in water and bring to a boil together

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Steaming-Asparagus.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"]

Tips for cleaning and caring for your cookware:
  • Soak glass and metal cookware to save on scrubbing time
  • If food is stuck in the pot or pan, add a couple of inches of water to it and bring to a boil; allow to boil for a few minutes then wash the dish in hot running water (be careful not to burn yourself!)
  • Avoid putting cold water on a hot glass or cast-iron dish
  • Wash pots and pans (including cast-iron) immediately using hot water

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] Special care for cast-iron:

  • Do not use soap
  • Dry immediately after washing (may use the stovetop)
  • Always renew the fat "seasoning" on the cast-iron after every rinse

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" _builder_version="3.0.50" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/Cast-Iron-Pan.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="left" always_center_on_mobile="on" border_style="solid" force_fullwidth="off" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] I hope this has given you the courage to begin reheating your food without a microwave. It is not difficult, it is simply a habit change. You can do it!   If you're unsure of how to reheat something, ask in the comments below! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

The Root Cause of Asthma {Video}

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Asthma

It is currently one of the most common diseases in the civilized world. But did you know that despite all of our medical advances, the occurrence, as well as complications and deaths related to asthma have skyrocketed? Asthma is more common than it used to be, and it's also more severe. Since 1980, the death rates for asthma have increased by more than 50% [1] In fact, asthma deaths were considered rare in the early 1900's [2]. So what changed?  

There were three major changes:

First, our world became more toxic. The effects of industrialization had taken its toll on our air, water and food. Additionally, we began to manufacture food-like substances to replace real food. These food-like substances are full of chemicals and preservatives, which had an unknown effect on the human body.   Second, we replaced saturated animal fats with hydrogenated vegetable oils and trans-fatty acids. This was a double whammy on our lungs. We removed the substance it relied most heavily on to function properly (saturated fat) and gave it a replacement fat full of toxins and unknown substances that it now had to deal with.   Third, medications like bronchodilators and other inhalers were invented. This forces the airways open against the body's desire to close off an area to allow for lung repair. Before medication were invented, asthma rarely caused death and was generally considered a benign condition.   To find out more about the root cause of asthma, and how the body works, check out my new video below!   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] https://youtu.be/Ium2XeUz9aU [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" _builder_version="3.0.50" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" border_style="solid"] References: [1] http://www.asthmamd.org/asthma-statistics/ [2] http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/rccm.200402-185OE [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Spring! And Natural Allergy Management

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Spring has come to my neighborhood! Over the last week, things have been budding and growing. Green has been showing, and flowers blooming. The sounds of spring have been happening for awhile, but are now in full force—birds chirping, squirrels chattering, and children playing. I took an sunset tour around my neighborhood to enjoy the spring evening, and I want to share with you some of the pictures I took. Then keep reading for some natural ways to manage your spring allergies! [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#ffffff" show_divider="off" height="30px " divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Purple-Flowers.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Garden-Beds.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Pink-Flowers.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Budding-Tree.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Chicks.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Flowering-Bush.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Daffodiles.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/Sunset-Tree.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#ffffff" show_divider="off" height="30px " divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] There is another way I know that spring is here… my allergies have started to flare. Since going through the GAPS diet, my allergies are mild compared to what they used to be, but they still cause minor irritation—enough that I need to address them. So today I am going to share with you what I do to manage my allergies naturally. But before we discuss management techniques, let’s review what allergies are. Allergy symptoms are a product of the immune system. And we can think of them as a signal from our body to let us know that something is going on. Basically, they signal two things: [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] The first is that an allergen (a protein chain that is usually referred to as an antigen) has bypassed the body’s protective mechanisms. When this happens, the body mounts a non-specific immune response (an inflammatory response) against that allergen. In this process, certain cells (called mast cells) are degranulated, and release things like histamine into the bloodstream. Histamine travels to receptor sites in the GI tract, respiratory tract and the skin. These receptors then trigger a further response to the allergen, and we see symptoms like hives, mucus production, and swelling. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] The second is that our liver is unable to keep up with processing mediators (like histamine) that have been released in the inflammatory response. As we saw above, histamine triggers the symptoms we are accustomed to in an allergic reaction. Histamine is not a problem when it is being processed and removed by the liver fairly quickly. But when it continues to circulate (because the liver isn’t pulling it out fast enough) it will continue to cause unpleasant symptoms—sending you signals that your body needs some assistance. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Okay, now that we are on the same page about what allergy symptoms are, let’s talk about ways to support your body so you don't suffer from them! Again, these symptoms are signals that your body needs some help. So what can we do to help support the liver and immune system? [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#000000" show_divider="on" height="10" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Feed it Fat

The immune system is a very hungry organ, and what it likes best to eat is fat! Especially the Vitamins A and D that it contains. These are both found in abundance in butter, as well as lard, fermented cod liver oil, and other animal fats. The cholesterol found in these fats also plays an important role, for it is cholesterol that helps the body repairdamage from inflammation (watch this video for more on this). [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#000000" show_divider="on" height="10" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Eat Sauerkraut

There are two benefits to eating sauerkraut (or fermented cabbage any way). The first is the probiotic benefit. The root cause of allergies is a leaky gut. Bad gut flora has everything to do with this. (This is too much to discuss in this post, so if you have further questions, I recommend chapter 6 of my book Notes From a GAPS Practitioner.) So eating probiotics will help the allergy problem, both long-term and short-term. However, if you are unused to eating large amounts of sauerkraut, I recommend you work up to it slowly. The second benefit of sauerkraut is the high amount of Vitamin C available in it. Lacto-fermenting cabbage increased the bioavailability of Vitamin C by about 4 times. Our immune system also needs Vitamin C to function well. So consuming large amounts of sauerkraut is like taking Vitamin C daily (which you could take in other ways, like arceola cherry powder). I enjoy sauerkraut, and find that if I eat between 1-3 cups a day (broken up with meals, or as a snack), my allergy symptoms are fairly well managed. I generally feel that my itchy eyes and throat are calmed down within about 20 minutes of eating it. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#000000" show_divider="on" height="10" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Apply Lavender Essential Oil

This is my quick-acting go-to if my symptoms are overwhelming. Lavender is a powerful antihistamine. If I run into a situation where my allergies flare up quickly, like having a cat rub against me, or when the cottonwood trees are seeding, I pull out my lavender oil. There are several ways to use it. You can apply it topically near the area that is affected (best for skin issues) or on the bottoms of your feet (if you don’t like the smell). You can diffuse it, so you breathe it into your mucus membranes and calm the histamine response there. Or (if you have a pure and safe brand like the one I use), you can take it internally. I prefer to place a drop or two under my tongue and let it absorb sublingually. This is the quickest way to get it into the bloodstream. Lavender tastes about like it smells, but the quick relief I get far outweighs the bitter taste it leaves. I usually feel relief from my symptoms in 2-5 minutes, but for most people it may take 10-20 minutes to feel the effect. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#000000" show_divider="on" height="10" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Support Your Liver

There are ways to help the liver when it is overtaxed. First, reduce the amount of toxins you are asking the liver to process, thus adding to its workload. In the spring I am more careful about what I eat. There are some foods I have “graduated” to that can be too much for my body to handle when it also has to deal with extra histamines in my “allergy season.” In the same way, it is good to be cautious about other toxins from chemicals in the environment (or on our skin) that are overloading the body. It is also important to use other methods of detox, such as detox baths and juicing, to help remove toxins and thus reducing the workload of the liver. Finally, eating liver (consuming the animal organ that matches our struggling organ is always helpful) regularly can be helpful. If you don’t like it, you can take desiccated liver. And for a little extra support, I will sometimes take the Standard Process supplement Antronex. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#000000" show_divider="on" height="10" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Try Something New

I have not tried this yet because I just learned about it, but this season I am going to try lacto-fermenting honey! Most of us have heard that honey can help with allergies, but it turns out that lacto-fermenting the honey increases these benefits even more! I’m interested to see how it turns out, and if it helps. The honey does have to be local to have a strong effect, and I fortunately have a little honey left over from the year I tried beekeeping. If you want to learn more about it, I would recommend starting HERE.   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#000000" show_divider="on" height="10" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]   If you have tried lacto-fermenting honey, found success with any of these natural means, or want to share other things you have found helpful with the community, then leave it in a comment below!  

Onward!

    References: McCance, K. and Huether, S. (2006). Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children. Elsevier Mosby. Philadelphia, PA. Pg. 249-255. Lavender and the Nervous System. Koulivarnd, P. Ghadiri, M., Gorji, A. (September 4, 2012) Retrieved March 20, 2017 from https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/681304/ [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Cholesterol Explained {Video}

[et_pb_section admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] One of the most frequent things I talk with people about it about cholesterol. It's usually in response to something like: "But I have a family history of high cholesterol.""Eating that much butter sounds great, but I can't, because I already have high cholesterol.""Won't bacon give me a heart attack?"   What I recorded in this video is what I share with them... and want to share with you... about what the role of cholesterol truly is in our bodies. Enjoy!   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_video admin_label="Video" src="https://youtu.be/IcvL0pKiRhs" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Take Courage

[et_pb_section admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] I had an interesting week last week. For the first time in a while, my body stopped me in my tracks. I'm not saying that I've had symptom-free days every day for the last few months. I have had the occasional headache, been sick with colds, and felt the effect of too much detox or too little sleep.  

But this was a little more.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="40px||40px|" custom_padding_last_edited="on|phone" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] For four days I was out of commission, only doing the bare essentials. I cut out all the “extras" in my diet, ate foods only on GAPS Intro Stage 1, and increased my fat and desiccated liver intake. I went to bed hours early, took naps during the day, and still felt exhausted. I drank enough water and took enough detox baths to dry up a river, and I applied essential oils liberally. Nothing really helped, beyond occasionally providing a few minutes of partial relief. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] I am still not sure what exactly was going on, but as best as I can figure, it seemed to be some kind of significant detox reaction. I had a headache that wavered between annoying and a migraine, sore muscles, tinnitus, nausea, VERY tired eyes, and a brain that simply would not focus. None of these were fun, but what brought me to tears was not any of these symptoms.   It was fear.   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Fear that I had missed something (since I wasn’t sure why I felt so awful). Fear that I had pushed myself too hard (although I had been pacing myself). Fear that my headache would never end (this did seem logical at the time). Fear that my eyesight was failing (my vision was fine two days before). Fear that I would feel like this forever, I would never again feel well, and I was wrong to think that I could be a “healthy” person. And just fear. Fear about nothing. But these fears were overwhelming my thoughts and reason. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="40px||40px|" custom_padding_last_edited="on|tablet" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] My overwhelming fear only lasted a short time, because I have a great Friend who does not leave me alone. He gives me hope (see post), and I really couldn't do life without Him. He walked with me in that dark moment and let me know He was with me, and that it was going to be okay. That brought me peace, even though I still believed that my headache would be a constant companion for the rest of my life (honestly, I really did). [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] While it was not all rainbows and unicorns after that, the paralyzing fear was gone. It was good to remember how hopelessness feels, a feeling I have often experienced on my health journey. When it feels nearly impossible to believe that anything could change, that better health could be possible. It's good to be reminded, so I can be grateful, and so I can better help you. It takes courage to go to another practitioner, change your diet yet again, or make another lifestyle change. It takes tremendous courage and strength to keep striving for better health, when health seems to be an impossible goal. If this is where you are at rightnow, you are so very strong and courageous. I want you to know that. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#2a4a97" show_divider="on" height="50" divider_style="solid" divider_position="center" hide_on_mobile="on"] [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] From years of experience I know that it takes courage to be sick. But over the last few months I have learned that it also takes courage to be well. It takes courage to live outside of the awful (yet familiar) limits of a health condition. Courage to eat a food that is now okay for you, order off a restaurant menu, or eat a food your friend offered without grilling them about ingredients. Courage to let your just-in-case prescription run out. And it takes tremendous courage to live your life in freedom, even when facing (like I did last week) a short illness, detox reaction or bad day. Courage to push the limits because you refuse to be intimidated by them anymore.   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

And...

...sometimes you melt in the middle of the floor, in tears, because you think your health has collapsed and you're probably going to be blind soon!

That’s okay too!

Courage is not the absence of fear. In fact, without something to fear, there can be no courage.

Don’t be ashamed of your fear, but don’t let it rule you, either. Remember, you are strong, and you are made for more.

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]   No matter where you are in your health journey, take courage!   As we go, Onward! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Why Betty Got Some Better Butter

[et_pb_section admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Do you remember the old nursery rhyme/tongue twister about Betty Botter buying butter?

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Betty-Botter.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_margin="50px|||" custom_margin_last_edited="on|phone"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#2a4a97" show_divider="on" height="15px" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on"] [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Betty Botter bought a bit of butter;“ But,” she said, “this butter’s bitter! If I put it in my batter It will make my batter bitter But a bit of better butter Will make my batter better.” So she bought a bit of butter Better than her bitter butter, Made her bitter batter better. So it was better Betty Botter Bought a bit of better butter.

(courtesy of Wikipedia)

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#2a4a97" show_divider="on" height="15px" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on"] [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Which begs the deep, philosophical question—was it actually important for her to buy better butter? Or did it just make the rhyme work? Just kidding... ...or am I? Like many nursery rhymes, I believe this one also has a hidden meaning, a bit of wisdom that is being passed on through the "silly" childhood lines.

Wisdom that we should take to heart...

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Quality Matters

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Not all food is created equal. Hopefully you have all had the chance to eat fresh food out of a garden. Now compare that to much of the produce you can buy at the store. Can you see, smell and taste the difference? But isn't it all the same foods? How can it be different? Well, let's consider the differing conditions of, for example, a tomato. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

  1. Grew in good soil vs growth forced by fertilizers
  2. Cared for with love vs impersonally raised in mass
  3. Picked when it was ripe vs ripening in a truck

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Tomatoes.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] It makes sense that all these things affect the taste, but does it really matter? Even if it's not as delicious, isn't it still basically a tomato? Doesn't it give us good nutrients that support our bodies? [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Unfortunately, no. Taste, color and smell were put in place to show our bodies the quality and health of a plant. When the appeal is lacking, so is the nutrition. The same is true with all food. Meat, seafood, fruit, fats, dairy products, and any other single ingredient can be purchased at differing levels of quality. And when those ingredients are combined, the resulting dish can be bland or amazing! Top chefs know this. They know that ingredient selection is the most important factor in creating a delicious dish. You too can cook amazing food! Your kitchen skills matter some, but your ingredients matter more!   [/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#2a4a97" show_divider="on" height="15px" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on"] [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Additionally, when the food you are eating has higher nutritional content, you won't need to eat as much. When you are no longer a slave to processed food's addictive substances, or the sugar cravings of bad flora in your body, your body gives signals for eating properly. How does the body "properly" signal, you might ask.  

The body signals hunger when it is needing nutrients! 

 

When you eat nutrient-dense food, less will satisfy you! 

  Therefore, it is actually more efficient to eat higher-quality food, even if it costs more, because you will need to eat less of it.

The only time this does not give the appearance of being true is when you first start eating nutrient-dense food. When you begin giving your starving body the nutrients it so desperately needs in good-quality, real food, it will ask for that food often! This period of time often lasts one to three months long, although it can be longer. Don't worry, it's a good sign! Your eating will slowdown when your body has caught up. (Also as you add more fat into your diet. Fat is one of the most nutrient-dense foods on the planet, and it is incredibly satisfying.)

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So, the take away for today is that quality matters!

  I know this is easier said than done. Next time we will talk about some ways that could make it possible for you to feed better quality food to yourself and your family. Y'all come on back now... Onward! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

GAPS Milkshake

Our recipe this week is a simple, but powerful one! It is called the GAPS™ milkshake, and it packs a powerful punch! This delicious, satisfying and helpful beverage is a wonderful way to daily consume your freshly-pressed juices, and can even be a meal.

The GAPS™ milkshake is mix of juice, protein, and fat. Because it is easily digested, usually in about 20 minutes, it can be eaten when you don't have much time to sit and digest. But because it contains fat and protein, as well as sugar, it can sustain you for a while, often a few hours.

Let's get down to making it! You need a few simple ingredients.

  1. Freshly pressed juices (I like carrots, but you can use any juice mixture)

  2. Sour cream (creme fraische), coconut oil, or another fat

  3. Raw egg (whole or just the yoke)

  4. Raw honey (optional, and only a little!)

Juice the carrot (and/or other vegetables and fruits). I use organic vegetables so I just rinse them off (sometimes). You can see my (not) high-end juicer in the picture! But it works! Don't feel like you have to spend hundreds of dollars to juice (this one was about $40). It is a centrifuge juicer, and I try to consume the juices within 15 minutes to get the most enzyme activity, but again, it works! Successful GAPS is not about perfection, it is about action!

Once you have your juice in a glass, you are ready to add your other ingredients. Add 1-2 raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs. If you do add the white, I recommend using a spring whisk or a blender to break up the white--that is a hard texture to get down! With raw eggs, it is also important to know the source of your eggs (were the chickens healthy) and try not to touch the shell with the egg. If there happens to be any salmonella present, it is likely still on the outside of the egg, not the inside. Of course, there is no guarantee, especially if the eggs are washed (this breaks down the protective layer around the egg), so consume at your own risk! But I have yet to get sick, even using store bought eggs sometimes.

Add the sour cream (a good-sized dollop). The sour cream is there primarily to slow the absorption of sugar from the juice—add to taste. You can also add coconut oil if you are not tolerating dairy (technically this makes it a GAPS Smoothie) Stir, whisk or blend together.

You can add a little honey if you need to. It is better to add some fruit to your juice ingredients instead of honey, but that isn't always an option, especially on early stages. I have found that the egg whites are a little bitter, and when I add a whole egg instead of just the yolk, I often need a little honey to help it go down. That's it! All that's left is to enjoy it!

And it's gone!

As I said, this is a great "meal" for those on-the-go mornings. Especially if you are hungry early in the morning, this is a great thing to drink, as it is not a burden to the digestive system. The juices support your body's cleansing processes, which are often happening from 4am-10am every day. You could also add beet kvass to this beverage as an extra liver cleanser. It can overwhelm the flavor, so I prefer to drink mine separately. Experiment with your preferences, and with the recipe! Let us know how you like it best!

Onward!

GAPS Milkshake

GAPSmilkshake-150x150.jpg
  • Freshly Pressed Juices

  • Sour cream, creme faiche, coconut oil, or another fat

  • Raw Egg ((whole or just the yoke))

  • Raw Honey ((optional and only a little))

  1. Juice the carrot (and/or other vegetables and fruits).

  2. Add 1-2 raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs. If you do add the white, I recommend using a spring whisk or a blender to break up the white–that is a hard texture to get down!

  3. Add the sour cream to taste. The sour cream is there primarily to slow the absorption of sugar from the juice.

  4. Stir, whisk or blend together.

  5. Add a little honey if you need to

With raw eggs, it is also important to know the source of your eggs (were the chickens healthy) and try not to touch the shell with the egg. If there happens to be any salmonella present, it is likely still on the outside of the egg, not the inside. Of course, there is no guarantee, especially if the eggs are washed (this breaks down the protective layer around the egg), so consume at your own risk! 

I have found that the egg whites are a little bitter, and when I add a whole egg instead of just the yolk, I often need a little honey to help it go down.

The One About Fat

[et_pb_section bb_built="1" admin_label="section" transparent_background="off" background_color="#ffffff" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding_tablet="50px|0|50px|0" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_post_title title="on" meta="on" author="on" date="on" categories="on" comments="on" featured_image="on" featured_placement="below" parallax_effect="on" parallax_method="off" text_orientation="left" text_color="dark" text_background="off" text_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0.9)" module_bg_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" title_all_caps="off" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" title_font_size="28px" title_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" background_color="rgba(255,255,255,0)" parallax="on"]   [/et_pb_post_title][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_image src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/Amy_3.png" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="center" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" _builder_version="3.0.85" show_bottom_space="on" animation_direction="off"]   [/et_pb_image][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"]

Amy Mihaly Health Consultant

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" text_font_size="16" text_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"] Do you know what makes food delicious and nutritious? Today we are going to breech a taboo subject. Today we are talking about fat!Did you know that fat is good for you? That’s right, good ol’ fashioned animal fat--butter, lard, cream, bacon grease--yum!!!I know I know, I just opened up a can of worms… well, since it’s open, let’s do a little fishing!How can I possibly say fat is healthy? Low-fat diets are preached everywhere--school, friends, doctors, television! Isn’t it a know fact that fat is clogging our arteries and causing heart attacks and strokes? Everyone knows that low-fat is the healthy way to go. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="0px|||" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" column_padding_mobile="on" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_divider color="#777777" show_divider="on" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="off" disabled_on="off"]   [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" text_font_size="21" text_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" text_text_color="#a32416" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" text_line_height="1.8em" text_line_height_last_edited="on|phone" text_line_height_phone="1.7em" custom_padding="||0px|" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"]

But what if fat is not bad for us?

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider color="#777777" show_divider="on" divider_style="solid" divider_position="bottom" hide_on_mobile="off" disabled_on="off"]   [/et_pb_divider][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="0px||0px|" padding_mobile="on" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" column_padding_mobile="on" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" text_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" text_font_size="16" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"] In my family, we tell the story of my great-grandmother, who lived into her nineties DESPITE the fact that she would eat the gristle off everyone’s plates. But maybe she lived so long BECAUSE she ate that gristle? How can I say that? Because we NEED fat! It is an important building block in every one of our cells, and is necessary for many body systems to even function.What if fat is good for us?How can I say that? Let’s look at that together.It is important to eat fat with any food that we eat--let’s talk about why. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="0px||0px|" padding_mobile="on" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" text_font_size="16" text_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"]

Carbs and Sugars:

When we eat simple carbs and sugars (even natural ones), the sugar is quickly absorbed, causing the blood sugar to spike. The body then releases lots of insulin to bring the blood sugar back down. Often, the blood sugar drops back down too quickly and triggers hunger a couple hours later. Then this whole cycle repeats. When eaten with these foods, fat slows the absorption of sugar, leading to a slow and gentle rise in blood sugar, and avoiding the insulin drop and the “blood sugar roller coaster.” [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_divider color="#ffffff" show_divider="off" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" height="50" disabled_on="on|on|off"]   [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_image src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/bees.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="right" sticky="off" align="center" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" custom_margin_last_edited="on|tablet" animation_direction="right" animation_style="slide" animation_duration="500ms" animation_intensity_slide="10%" _builder_version="3.0.85" show_bottom_space="on"]   [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="0px||0px|" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_divider color="#ffffff" show_divider="off" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" height="50" disabled_on="on|on|off"]   [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_image src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Veggies_300x300.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" animation_direction="left" animation_style="slide" animation_duration="500ms" animation_intensity_slide="10%" _builder_version="3.0.85" show_bottom_space="on"]   [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"]

Vegetables:

We are told to eat a lot of vegetables because they are full of vitamins and minerals that we need. This is true, but those great vitamins and minerals are not very easily absorbed by us because we lack something cows have--extra stomachs. We need help to extract even a little of the nutrition available in a vegetable. Enter fat! When eaten with vegetables, fat provides carriers for many vitamins and minerals, allowing us to reap the benefit of plants beyond the fiber. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="0px|||" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on" custom_padding_last_edited="on|phone" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"]

Protein:

Protein, too, needs to be eaten with fat. When protein is absorbed from our intestines, the body needs to pair it with vitamin A (a fat-soluble vitamin) before using it. When we don’t eat fat along with our protein (think boneless, skinless chicken breasts), the body steals vitamin A from its storage place in the liver. If this happens regularly, we can become vitamin A deficient. Aside from causing vitamin A deficiency symptoms (night-blindness and immune suppression), it can lead to vitamin D deficiency. And because these two are linked, you will not be able to correct a vitamin D deficiency (no matter how much you supplement) unless you correct the vitamin A deficiency as well. Fortunately, both are present in animal fat! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_divider color="#ffffff" show_divider="off" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="on" height="50" disabled_on="on|on|off"]   [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_image src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/Protein_300x300-180.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="right" sticky="off" align="center" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" custom_margin_last_edited="on|tablet" animation_direction="right" animation_style="slide" animation_duration="500ms" animation_intensity_slide="10%" _builder_version="3.0.85" show_bottom_space="on"]   [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="0px|||" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" column_padding_mobile="on" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_divider color="#777777" show_divider="on" divider_style="solid" divider_position="top" hide_on_mobile="off" disabled_on="off"]   [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" text_font_size="21" text_font_size_last_edited="on|phone" text_text_color="#a32416" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" text_line_height="1.8em" text_line_height_last_edited="on|phone" text_line_height_phone="1.7em" custom_padding="||0px|" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"]

So when do we eat fat? All the time! With everything!

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider color="#777777" show_divider="on" divider_style="solid" divider_position="bottom" hide_on_mobile="off" disabled_on="off"]   [/et_pb_divider][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"] Fat makes our food taste good! Low fat=low taste. In processed food, the taste void is often made up by increasing sugar or non-food substances like MSG. Adding fat back into your diet adds back natural flavor. Hello, delicious food!

About eating fat:

If you have been following a low-fat diet for a while, you can’t just start eating tons of fat--you will likely feel nauseous and may get loose stools. Instead, gradually increase your fat. Eating fermented foods or raw apple cider vinegar can help too. I recommend trying to add just ½ cup of added animal fat a day at first. Once your body is used to fat, try increasing the amount to 3-4 TBS of fat with each meal, or 1 ½ cups of added animal fat per day. After a while, your daily intake will likely settle between these amounts, varying based on your body’s needs. Listen to your body and eat as much as you are wanting. Once your body knows it has the option to eat fat when needed, it will be able to tell you how much it needs. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_text background_layout="light" background_color="#ffff99" custom_padding="20px|20px|20px|20px" custom_padding_last_edited="on|phone" custom_padding_phone="20px|30px|20px|30px" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial" _builder_version="3.0.85"]

Here are some ideas to increasing your dietary fat:

  • add a couple TBS of butter to your steamed vegetables (per serving)!
  • add creme fraiche (sour cream) to everything!
  • fry up your vegetables, meat or eggs in several TBS of butter, lard (learn to make your own) or bacon grease!
  • have a little bread with your butter!
  • eat your gristle!

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_text background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" module_alignment="left" background_position="top_left" background_repeat="repeat" background_size="initial"] What creative and delicious ideas do you have about how to eat more fat? Share them here! Onward! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]

Still Healing

[et_pb_section admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Hi everyone,

I realize I have been absent on the web for the last little while, and I would like to share why...

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="||20px|" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/yellowflower.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_margin="38px|||"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_padding="||20px|"] I have been recently reminded that my body is still healing... I have felt so great over the last few months that I forgot that I am healing years and years of sickness and imbalance, and that does not magically disappear overnight, or even over a few months. I'm glad that I am where I am--in so many ways and for so many reasons. I am glad I am healing, even when it takes so much energy to do so. Even though I have to slow down... maybe I'm glad because I have to slow down. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="0px|||" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" column_padding_mobile="on"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#05492e" show_divider="on" height="0" divider_style="solid" divider_position="center" divider_weight="4" hide_on_mobile="on"] [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" text_font_size="20"]

... maybe I'm glad because I have to slow down

[/et_pb_text][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#05492e" show_divider="on" height="0" divider_style="solid" divider_position="center" divider_weight="4" hide_on_mobile="on"] [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_padding="40px|||" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop"] I'm glad to be reminded about what I am healing from. Some "flare ups" and detoxing that I have been experiencing the last couple weeks have reminded me what my "normal" used to be. I'm glad it is not my normal anymore. Some of this flair up has been out of my control... some crazy things have happened to people around me that has made my life busier, because I have been helping them out. But most is in my control. A little more sleep, a little laziness in not getting up when I remembered I forgot to take fermented cod liver oil. Giving in to eating a little to much fruit, and not enough stock because it's easy. Because it's what I want in the moment, not prioritizing investing in what my body needs. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" text_font_size="20" custom_padding="10px|||"] __And____________Down_________________________I__________________________________Went   [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_divider admin_label="Divider" color="#05492e" show_divider="on" height="0" divider_style="solid" divider_position="center" divider_weight="4" hide_on_mobile="on"] [/et_pb_divider][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Down and out!

Focus on sleep, rest, time out from the world and the busyness of life--whether or not I could "afford" to do so. My body was starting to wander from the path of healing and wellness. Since I was not giving it foods to heal, it was making me slow down physically, taking the energy it needed.

...which is good...

I appreciate the human body so much more than I ever have, and the amazing ways it compensates and presses on even with little to work with. But there are certain foods that help it heal and function well, and I know what they are. And with my knowledge comes my responsibility. To my body. To myself. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/RunDownFence-e1471026465748.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_margin="10px|||"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Also, I was letting my neighborhood run down--and unsavory characters were gaining strength in my gut. They were starting to dictate what I was craving again. And adding toxins to my body to further slow me down. And it becomes hard to fight all that. It is discouraging that I have to keep fighting to correct the bad that has been happening for years. And hard that it can so quickly slip away. It is hard to remember that I am still recovering, and not very far away from the time when I was very sick. [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="2_3"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] So the choice is there--fight again, or go back to how I was. I was functional, but also so cautious. Not able to make a mistake without miserable consequences like migraines, stomach aches, and more. I could go there--it sure is easier than GAPS, and I would be fine, probably, for a while... [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_3"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2014/08/HealingFlowers.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" /][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" text_font_size="18"]

But I have a bigger goal--not just to be alive, survive, exist. My goal is to heal. To be well--as well as I can manage to be with my imperfect body in this broken world. To be in a state of living!

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Thankfully I took action early. It only took a week to get my trajectory back on course. I've almost regained that lost ground--almost. But I have gained something else that is very valuable. A deeper resolve to continue. To invest and expect a return, even when that investment is a little uncomfortable, and a little inconvenient. So forward I go--not perfectly or without faltering. But I know which direction I want to go, and I know that which lies in that direction is worth the journey. Onward! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]