eggs

Simple Easy Hollandaise Sauce Recipe

GAPS Legal Hollandaise Sauce Recipe Made with Limes

What do you do when you are bored or eggs two ways (scrambled or fried?)... make hollandaise sauce, of course!

I'm not sure how the true chefs will react to this recipe because I'm sure I don't get my hollandaise sauce as smooth as it's supposed to be, but so many of you have asked for this favorite recipe of mine that I want to share it here! I have now made this sauce dozens of times and there are a few principles I have learned about what makes this dish different than plain scrambled eggs.

#1 Don't do this in a cast-iron or your eggs will taste like iron.

#2 Lower heat makes for smoother sauce. But if you are in a hurry and don't mind lumps, more heat and less time still creates a delicious meal.

#3 The acid (lime or lemon juice) is the real key to this dish. I make my plain scrambled eggs with similar amounts of butter, but it is the lime that makes the eggs more smooth.

#4 I prefer lime over lemon because it is more mild and I feel I can add more of it without overpowering the dish. I believe this makes the hollandaise sauce easier to successfully make. After having done this many times there is a color change I look for when adding the lime juice. When I achieve this color change I know that my sauce will turn out decently smooth.

As you make this sauce, don't give up if you don't achieve your desired smoothness the first time! As with most cooking, this is an art and skill that you will get better at with practice. Enjoy your hollandaise sauce!

Simple Hollandaise Sauce

Ingredients

  • 2 eggs

  • 3 (ish) tablespoons Butter

  • ½ lime, freshly squeezed

Directions

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Melt butter in pan on very low heat.

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A smooth hollandaise sauce is achievable! Whisk the eggs quickly before adding to melted butter. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Beat two eggs in a bowl.

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Hollandaise Sauce is my most requested recipe! I eat this GAPS Legal and GAPS friendly sauce on chicken, vegetables and with eggs. It's also Whole 30 and Paleo friendly! Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Add eggs to pan as soon as butter is melted.

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The key to making a good Hollandaise Sauce is to whisk constantly for a smooth sauce. This GAPS legal recipe couldn't be easier! Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Mix sauce together, stirring constantly. Add lime juice. Using a whisk will get you a smoother sauce but I don’t mind a chunkier sauce.

If your eggs start to thicken, turn down your heat or add more lime juice.

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An easy simple recipe for Hollandaise Sauce with only three ingredients. This recipe is legal on the GAPS Diet, Whole 30 and Paleo. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

The sauce is done when it holds together more and you can start to see the bottom of the pan.

Serve immediately! Serve with chicken, artichokes, vegetables.

Note:

Do not cook this is in an cast iron pan! Use a stainless steel pan with good heat protection.

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Hollandaise Sauce with Limes

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 eggs
  • 3 (ish) tablespoons Butter
  • ½ lime, freshly squeezed

instructions:

How to cook Hollandaise Sauce with Limes

  1. Melt butter in pan on very low heat.
  2. A smooth hollandaise sauce is achievable! Whisk the eggs quickly before adding to melted butter. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.
  3. Beat two eggs in a bowl.
  4. Hollandaise Sauce is my most requested recipe! I eat this GAPS Legal and GAPS friendly sauce on chicken, vegetables and with eggs. It's also Whole 30 and Paleo friendly! Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.
  5. Add eggs to pan as soon as butter is melted.
  6. The key to making a good Hollandaise Sauce is to whisk constantly for a smooth sauce. This GAPS legal recipe couldn't be easier! Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.
  7. Mix sauce together, stirring constantly. Add lime juice. Using a whisk will get you a smoother sauce but I don’t mind a chunkier sauce.
  8. If your eggs start to thicken, turn down your heat or add more lime juice.
  9. An easy simple recipe for Hollandaise Sauce with only three ingredients. This recipe is legal on the GAPS Diet, Whole 30 and Paleo. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.
  10. The sauce is done when it holds together more and you can start to see the bottom of the pan.
  11. Serve immediately! Serve with chicken, artichokes, vegetables.
  12. Note:
  13. Do not cook this is in an cast iron pan! Use a stainless steel pan with good heat protection.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Almond Flour Cookies with Cacao Nibs

GAPS Legal Almond Cookies

Adapted from The Paleo Plan Makes 24 Cookies GAPS Legal on Stage 4

Ingredients for gaps legal chocolate chip cookies

  • 2 cups Almond Flour

  • ¼ cup Whey

  • 2 large eggs

  • 1/3 cup Room Temperature Coconut Oil

  • 1 tsp Baking Soda

  • ½ tsp Vanilla

  • ⅛ tsp Salt

  • ¼ cup Honey (or ⅓ cup date syrup)

  • ⅛-¼ cup Raw Cacao Nibs

Directions for chocolate chip cookies on the gaps diet

gaps-legal-chocolate-chip-cookies-with-almond-flour-fermented-almond-flour-cookies-what-to-do-with-fermented-almond-flour

24 Hours in Advance

Add whey to almond flour. Stir to moisten.

Leave covered on counter for 24 hours to ferment.

gaps-legal-chocolate-chip-cookies-with-almond-flour-fermented-almond-flour-cookies-what-to-do-with-fermented-almond-flour

The Next Day

Preheat oven to 350. Add your baking sheet to the oven to preheat. These cookies bake better on a hot dish.To fermented flour, add eggs and stir.

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Add coconut oil to mixture. The coconut oil should be room temperature. If it is melted, you won’t have the right consistency.

Add the baking soda, vanilla, salt and honey (or date paste) to the mixture. Mix well.

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Add cacao nibs to dough mixture.

Remove baking sheet from oven. Line with parchment paper.

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Spoon approx. 1 tbsp size rounds of dough onto parchment paper.

Bake at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes until edges are golden brown and cookies seem firm. Watch them closely after 8 minutes. They will go from raw to burnt quickly!

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Almond Flour Cookies with Cacao Nibs

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 cups Almond Flour
  • ¼ cup Whey
  • 2 large eggs
  • 1/3 cup Room Temperature Coconut Oil
  • 1 tsp Baking Soda
  • ½ tsp Vanilla
  • ⅛ tsp Salt
  • ¼ cup Honey (or ⅓ cup date syrup)
  • ⅛-¼ cup Raw Cacao Nibs

instructions:

How to cook Almond Flour Cookies with Cacao Nibs

24 Hours in Advance
  1. Add whey to almond flour. Stir to moisten.
  2. Leave covered on counter for 24 hours to ferment.
The Next Day
  1. Preheat oven to 350. Add your baking sheet to the oven to preheat. These cookies bake better on a hot dish.To fermented flour, add eggs and stir.
  2. Add coconut oil to mixture. The coconut oil should be room temperature. If it is melted, you won’t have the right consistency.
  3. Add the baking soda, vanilla, salt and honey (or date paste) to the mixture. Mix well.
  4. Add cacao nibs to dough mixture.
  5. Remove baking sheet from oven. Line with parchment paper.
  6. Spoon approx. 1 tbsp size rounds of dough onto parchment paper.
  7. Bake at 350 degrees for 10-15 minutes until edges are golden brown and cookies seem firm. Watch them closely after 8 minutes. They will go from raw to burnt quickly!
Created using The Recipes Generator

Mayo Free Deviled Eggs Recipe

Mayo Free GAPS Legal Deviled Eggs 2 Ways

The story of these GAPS legal deviled eggs has a long beginning.

One of the foods I miss most? Mayonnaise. Now I know there are different mayos out there, even ones you can make yourself that are GAPS legal. But unless it tastes like the Real Mayo deliciousness that I remember, I have no interest in consuming it. I was a mayo snob long before I payed attention to what I ate!

Because I haven't found a mayo my taste buds approve of there is no mayonnaise in my refrigerator, even if it's just to make recipes like deviled eggs with. So one day when I had a hankerin' for deviled eggs I got the creative juices flowing and started experimenting with recipes. My first thought was to substitute the mayo for butter. After all, fat is the main reason deviled eggs are so good, right? A batch with butter resulted in delicious and very rich eggs, but the texture was very strange (hard), especially if refrigeration was required. Then I thought to add some sour cream to the mixture. At first I still had too much butter (50:50 ratio), but eventually found a ratio that works well—the butter adds some firmness to the "runnier" sour cream. This gives you a good base that allows you to flavor your deviled eggs as desired.

Next I wanted to come up with a dairy-free egg that my sister could enjoy. I immediately thought of using avocado as the fat. This also resulted in a delicious deviled egg, that's just a little green. I have served these eggs to many people, and as long as they know there is avocado in it, no one has had an issue with the color. And these are perfect for serving at a Dr. Seuss gathering as part of green eggs and ham! No artificial coloring required!

I have discovered that deviled egg recipes can be very familial. If these don't taste like the deviled eggs your grandma made, I encourage you to springboard off the base ingredients and modify the recipe to try and recreate your family memories. After all, that's what recipes are all about, aren't they? If you come up with something particularly delicious, we'd love if you share it with us in the comments below!

Enjoy these GAPS Legal Deviled Eggs, 2 Ways!

Dairy Free Deviled Eggs with Avocado

Ingredients for Avocado Deviled Eggs

  • 6 eggs

  • 1 medium or ½ cup Avocado

  • 1 tsp Mustard Powder

  • 1 tbsp of water

  • 1 tsp Vinegar

  • ½ tsp Honey

  • ¼ tsp Salt

  • Lemon

  • Chili Powder (optional)

  • Paprika (optional)

  • Cilantro (optional)

Directions for Avocado Deviled Eggs

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Fill a medium saucepan with cold water. Add eggs. Bring eggs to a boil and cook for 5-6 minutes covered.

Remove eggs from heat. Let set for 5 minutes. Test if your egg is hard boiled by removing one from the pan and spinning it. A hard boiled egg will spin upright if the yolk is hard.

Rinse the eggs under cold water or place them in an ice bath.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Avocado

Peel the eggs. Peeling them while they are still a little warm will help get the shell off.

Cut the peeled eggs in half.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Avocado

In a bowl, scoop out all the egg yolks. They should easily slide out with your finger.Set the egg whites onto a plate.

Crumble the egg yolks with a fork.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Avocado

Mash the avocado into the egg yolks with a fork.

Add mustard powder to the egg yolk mixture.

Add water and vinegar to mixture. Mix well.

Add honey, salt and lemon. Mix well.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Avocado

Fill the egg whites with a generous scoop.

Sprinkle with chili powder or paprika or top with sprigs of cilantro.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Avocado

If you have leftover egg mixture, you can dip vegetables into it or smear onto scrambled eggs or crackers.

For a spicier egg, add more mustard powder!

These are legal on GAPS stage 4.


Sour Cream Deviled Eggs

Ingredients for Deviled Eggs with Sour Cream

  • 6 eggs

  • ½ c Sour Cream

  • 1 tbsp Room Temperature Butter

  • 1 - 1 ½ tsp Vinegar

  • 1 tsp Honey

  • ¼ tsp Mustard Powder

  • ⅛ tsp salt

  • Paprika (optional)

Directions for Deviled Eggs with Sour Cream

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Sour-Cream

Fill a medium saucepan with cold water. Add eggs. Bring eggs to a boil and cook for 5-6 minutes covered.

Remove eggs from heat. Let set for 5 minutes. Test if your egg is hard boiled by removing one from the pan and spinning it. A hard boiled egg will spin upright if the yolk is hard.

Rinse the eggs under cold water or place them in an ice bath.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Sour-Cream

Peel the eggs. Peeling them while they are still a little warm will help get the shell off.

Cut the peeled eggs in half.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Sour-Cream

In a bowl, scoop out all the egg yolks. They should easily slide out with your finger.

Set the egg whites onto a plate.

Crumble the egg yolks with a fork.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Sour-Cream

Add the butter to the mixture and mix well.

Add the sour cream. Mix.

Add 1 tsp of the vinegar plus all the honey and salt. Mix.

Deviled-Eggs-Made-Without-Mayo-Mayo-Free-Deviled-Eggs-Deviled-Eggs-For-GAPS-Diet-Deviled-Eggs-Made-With-Sour-Cream

These are less tangy than a traditional deviled egg. To add more tang, add up to ½ tsp of vinegar.

Fill the egg whites with a generous scoop.

Sprinkle with paprika.


Mayo Free Deviled Eggs with Avocado

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 6 eggs
  • 1 medium or ½ cup Avocado
  • 1 tsp Mustard Powder
  • 1 tbsp of water
  • 1 tsp Vinegar
  • ½ tsp Honey
  • ¼ tsp Salt
  • Lemon
  • Chili Powder (optional)
  • Paprika (optional)
  • Cilantro (optional

instructions:

How to cook Mayo Free Deviled Eggs with Avocado

  1. Fill a medium saucepan with cold water. Add eggs. Bring eggs to a boil and cook for 5-6 minutes covered.
  2. Remove eggs from heat. Let set for 5 minutes. Test if your egg is hard boiled by removing one from the pan and spinning it. A hard boiled egg will spin upright if the yolk is hard.
  3. Rinse the eggs under cold water or place them in an ice bath.
  4. Peel the eggs. Peeling them while they are still a little warm will help get the shell off.
  5. Cut the peeled eggs in half.
  6. In a bowl, scoop out all the egg yolks. They should easily slide out with your finger.Set the egg whites onto a plate.
  7. Crumble the egg yolks with a fork.
  8. Mash the avocado into the egg yolks with a fork.
  9. Add mustard powder to the egg yolk mixture.
  10. Add water and vinegar to mixture. Mix well.
  11. Add honey, salt and lemon. Mix well.
  12. Fill the egg whites with a generous scoop.
  13. Sprinkle with chili powder or paprika or top with sprigs of cilantro.
  14. If you have leftover egg mixture, you can dip vegetables into it or smear onto scrambled eggs or crackers.
  15. For a spicier egg, add more mustard powder!
  16. These are legal on GAPS stage 4.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Mayo Free Deviled Eggs with Sour Cream

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 6 eggs
  • ½ c Sour Cream
  • 1 tbsp Room Temperature Butter
  • 1 - 1 ½ tsp Vinegar
  • 1 tsp Honey
  • ¼ tsp Mustard Powder
  • ⅛ tsp salt
  • Paprika (optional)

instructions:

How to cook Mayo Free Deviled Eggs with Sour Cream

  1. Fill a medium saucepan with cold water. Add eggs. Bring eggs to a boil and cook for 5-6 minutes covered.
  2. Remove eggs from heat. Let set for 5 minutes. Test if your egg is hard boiled by removing one from the pan and spinning it. A hard boiled egg will spin upright if the yolk is hard.
  3. Rinse the eggs under cold water or place them in an ice bath.
  4. Peel the eggs. Peeling them while they are still a little warm will help get the shell off.
  5. Cut the peeled eggs in half.
  6. In a bowl, scoop out all the egg yolks. They should easily slide out with your finger.
  7. Set the egg whites onto a plate.
  8. Crumble the egg yolks with a fork.
  9. Add the butter to the mixture and mix well.
  10. Add the sour cream. Mix.
  11. Add 1 tsp of the vinegar plus all the honey and salt. Mix.
  12. These are less tangy than a traditional deviled egg. To add more tang, add up to ½ tsp of vinegar.
  13. Fill the egg whites with a generous scoop.
  14. Sprinkle with paprika.
Created using The Recipes Generator

New Year's Resolutions: How to Make Successful Habit Changes

As I'm writing this, we are almost half way through December. This time of year is about getting ready for the holidays AND the new year.   As we are looking forward to the new year, most of us are thinking about new habits we want to start (or renew). But this can be tricky. You only have so much time and energy to spend on habit change, and some health trends are not actually helpful to you. I want to help you plan for this upcoming year. Let's talk about how decide what habits are right for you!

#1 Make changes that make sense

Starting habits you can't keep doing is so common we write comic strips about it! This can happen for several reasons: we try to change too much at once, we don't put forth enough effort, or we are trying to make a change we are not ready for.   No matter what you decide to change, all change requires energy and effort. And sometimes we fail to make a change because we take on too much or are lazy. But most of us do want to change. We have every intention of making changes and sticking with them.

So what's the problem?

Often, we try to make changes based on what we think we should change, instead of what makes sense, in our life, to change.

For example: You read a health trend article on social media about doing interval training five days a week. There are so many benefits! So you decide to start doing thirty minutes a day. But you had an old knee injury that is easily aggravated, and by the third day you are in so much pain you have to take medication. You make it to the fifth day, glad for the break. After two rest days you are still walking with a limp, and decide not to continue the interval training until you can walk without pain again. It takes three weeks to feel fully recovered, but you never start up your interval training again.

What do you think this shows? Too many changes? No, let say that this was the only thing you decided to change at this time. Laziness? Many people (my old self included) would say that this you were lazy, or a wimp. But you did show dedication. You pushed through the pain to see if it would get better. But it didn't. In fact, it took your body almost a month to recover. You body let you know that you weren't ready for that change in that way.  

There was a time that if I had been living the above scenario, I would have felt like a failure, and called myself all kinds of names.

But now I look at that scenario and see it as a victory. You stopped because you were listening to your body! It told you this was too much for it right now, and you listened. That's not a failure, that's a win! To seal the victory, you need to try something else. Exercise can be challenging. Just because it is doesn't mean you shouldn't do it. Find something that is a slight challenge for you... maybe it's a five or ten minute walk. Maybe it's a bike ride, or yoga. Maybe it's a martial arts class. Find something, listen to your body, and don't give up without a reason ("it's too hard" is not a reason, although "it hurts too much" is a clue to try something else).   When we make changes that make sense, we are working with our body instead of fighting against it. This creates a two-against-one scenario, and you are more likely to succeed!

#2 Don't make too many changes at once

The beginning of the new year is a great time to make changes. And I'm not saying you shouldn't take advantage of the timing, the motivation, and even the cultural shift to choose healthy over unhealthy. But making too many changes at one time doesn't set you up for success.

Most experts agree that we can only successfully make 1-3 changes at a time. Maybe with the new year energy you can make three. (Especially if they are opposites, like cut out soda and drink more water.)   There are very few people that can successfully create many new habits at one time. Let's assume you are not one of these people!   Did I just cut your resolutions list in half? Or more? You probably have some great habit changes on that list. How can you eliminate some?

First, cross off any habit changes that you only put on there because you saw it on social media and feel guilty for not doing it. Maybe that habit change is a good idea, but making a change solely because of guilt is not likely to end well. Second, out of the remaining habits, circle the ones that seem simpler to complete and the ones that make the most sense related to what is going on in your life right now (physically and circumstantially). Third, pick (at most) three habits to begin with. These may be the simplest (avoid chlorinated water: buy a shower and sink filter), or the most pressing (make meat stock every day to calm constant joint pain).

When you pick the habits that are most important or simple for you to change right now, you are more likely to succeed in those habits. This will create momentum (not to mention make you feel better, which leads to increased energy), which you can use to make the next set of important habit changes. (Which you can start making when the first set are well established, or about three weeks.)

#3 It's a marathon!

Habit change is not a sprint—it's a marathon. When you are training for a marathon, you don't run 26.2 miles every day. You run more some days, and less on others. Some days you don't run at all! Don't think of your habit change as a sprint... all or nothing and if you have one little mess up, you are out of the race. Our lives are not like that. We have built-in room for error (our race is approximately 80-90 years long). Everything we do either builds our body up (anabolic) or tears and wears it down (catabolic). We are never stable, we are always moving and changing. Being perfect is not the goal—making forward progress and positive change is.

As I wrote last week, get off the bandwagon bandwagon! There is no bandwagon to fall off of! The bandwagon is a myth! If you don't do a habit one day or another, you haven't lost your chances of success. Each choice that you make simply adds to the anabolic or catabolic side of the scale. But one (or even several) negative choices don't have to cause a downward spiral. They don't have that kind of power unless you give it to them.   There you go. Three ways to choose the habits that are best for you right now (which are also the ones in which you are most likely to succeed)! Now you know how to choose habits. Next time I will give you a list of some of my top habit suggestions for you to consider... one's that give you a lot of bang for you buck (or should I say results for you time)!   Until next time,

Onward!

Immunity: The Best Defense is a Good Offense {Part Two}

Last time we talked about the first two ways to support your body's immunesystem. In review, there are four ways or areas we can strengthen our immune system.

  • Eat a diet rich in nourishing foods

  • Support the good microbes in your body and environment

  • Detoxify to give the inflammatory arm of the immune system a break

  • Use essential oils and herbs to support your body's natural defenses

To read about the first two on the above list, check out the previous blog HERE. Today we are going to discuss the other ways you can prepare your body to be ready for environmental attacks. This is a longer post. Hang in there, and bookmark this so you can come back to it for reference.

Detoxify Your Body

Detoxification may not automatically come to mind when you think about supporting your body's immune system, but a high toxin level in your body can lead to an overwork of your immune system. How?

Toxins that are loose in the body cause damage to tissues, interfere with hormones and neurotransmitters, and in other ways increase the overall inflammation in the body. This is not a problem when it is happening on a small scale—in fact, our body was designed to handle this very thing—but when the toxins increase, so does the damage. This means that inflammation (a branch of the immune system) has to become more and more active to address the increase of damage from toxins. The more active it becomes, the more resources it needs. The "resources" of the immune system are nutrients (like cholesterol, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin C, zinc, etc.), energy from metabolic production, and different (specific) immune cells. Many of the same resources are needed both to fight infection and to deal with inflammation. So if toxin damage is high, causing increasing inflammation, then the resources will be directed to the inflammatory branch with the purpose of reducing inflammation. This is good, until a pathogenic microbe decides to invade the body. Then the infection branch of the immune system finds itself understaffed and under-resourced. Without enough resources to fight off the invaders quickly and efficiently, the immune system does the best it can, but it often takes a longer time to restore the body to health and balance. Sometimes the immune system cannot remove the invading threat, and that microbe finds a "corner" to take up residence in. If this happens, these microbes stay in the body and put a constant, low-level drain on the immune system that is constantly fighting to keep them in check. And when the immune system is weakened, these microbes may surface, causing more obvious and acute symptoms.

You can help your immune system out by detoxing.

A simple way to support your immune system is by reducing the amount of toxins, which then reduces the amount of inflammation in the body. There are some simple ways to detoxify your body. Walk in the sunshine!

Sunshine (on unprotected skin) initiates detox through one of your body's normal pathways for detox. Getting enough sun can be challenging in the colder months, but try to expose as much skin as possible, depending on the weather. And you will be able to stay outside longer if you are moving! And movement is not just about staying warm: when your muscles are worked your lymphatic system pumps stronger, as does your heart, which also help your body to remove the toxins.

Drink plenty of water!

I am not a huge fan of the "8 glasses of water every day" rule, because each individual body is going to have different water needs at different times, and this will likely change several times a day. Sometimes 8 glasses are too many, and sometimes it is not enough! Listen to your body to know what "enough water" means. To get you started, enough water means that your urine is pale yellow and does not have an odor, your lips are not dry, and you are not thirsty. When detoxing, it's very important to drink enough water to allow the body to flush the toxins from the body.

Get enough sleep!

Did you know that your body does most of its detoxing and repairing while you are sleeping? And this is not just sleeping whenever... actually your body heals the body more before midnight than after. In the words of Joseph Antell, a Clinical Nutritionalist and a Certified Herbalist, "Every hour [of sleep] before midnight is worth two hours after midnight in terms of healing..." So get to bed! Your body needs to rest. If you have problems sleeping, which is common in many health conditions, doing things like detoxing, eating nutrient-dense foods, turning off WiFi and leaving electronic devices out of the bedroom, and using natural sleep remedies like essential oils, herbs, or even a warm bath or warm milk can help your body get into a pattern of sleeping.

Support the Body's Natural Defenses

Sometimes our body needs some extra help. Maybe you just started eating nutrient-dense foods. Maybe your body's defenses were weakened by a stressful day, or not enough sleep. Maybe the microbe that is trying to invade is especially strong, or one your body hasn't seen before. Or maybe your body is doing a fine job fighting off the invaders, but it will appreciate any outside help you can give it. When you feel sick, do all the things we have talked about so far. Drink lots of meat stock. Avoid sugar, even from fruit. Double up on your fermented cod liver oil dose. Get lots of sleep and drink plenty of water. You can go out in the sun if it is sunny, not too cold or windy, and you are well wrapped (including your head and neck). In addition to all these, there are things provided in nature that support our bodies through the natural course of being sick. This is a large topic in itself, and today I will just introduce some of these to you.  

Foods:

  • Candied Onion: Cook in lots of butter, ghee or lard, then topped with a fried egg boosts the immune system and soothes a sore throat

  • Fermented Garlic (or raw): Raw or fermented garlic boost the immune system and can kill some pathogenic microbes

  • Honey: Raw, unfiltered honey has immune-supporting properties and is effective as a cough suppressant

  • Unpasteurized milk: Raw milk contains the active form of calcium (calcium lactate), which kills pathogens. Will help reduce a fever

This is not an exhaustive list of food!

Essential Oils:

  • Lavender: This is an antihistamine, so it will help calm inflammation from allergies or invading microbes

  • Oregano: This is a powerful antibacterial. It is a very hot oil, and should always be diluted with a carrier oil if applied to the skin

  • Protective blend: This is a blend of essential oils with antimicrobial properties, like clove, eucalyptus, and rosemary. It also supports the body's natural immune system

  • Respiratory blend: This blend contains things like eucalyptus, peppermint and lemon, which help to open up the airways and sinuses

  • Tea Tree: This has antiviral and anti-fungal properties, and can be helpful to support the body in fighting these types of infections

  • Many other essential oils support the body in a particular circumstances, but they are too specific to write about here

Important Note: I only recommend therapeutic grade essential oils. Essential oils bought at a health food store, or Walmart, are likely synthetic, diluted, and/or manipulated. To find out about the essential oils I recommend, and how to purchase them, click HERE.  

Other Options:

  • Flower essences (work with a practitioner or look in reference books)

  • Food-based supplements (like Acerola Cherry Powder, Indian Gooseberry, Calcium Lactate, etc.)

  • Herbs and tinctures (including Elderberry syrup, Echinacea, etc)

  • Homeopathic remedies (work with a homeopath or look in reference books)

As you can see, there are many specific ways you can support your body's immune system, both before an infection, and during one. Every body responds a little differently, so try different tools to see what works best for you and the members of your family. But don't forget to start with the basics!

If the immune system doesn't have enough resources or immune cells, or if the body is overwhelmed by inflammation, or if you aren't drinking enough water for things to move quickly, additional support can only help you so much in your sickness. And don't get overwhelmed with how much you could do! Just pick one thing and start doing it. Then keep going, and keep learning. You are going to do great!

Onward!  

This post contains affiliate links. Your trust is important to me, and I only recommend products that I trust.

Immunity: The Best Defense is a Good Offense {Part One}

Fall is coming! I hope you have been enjoying the cooler nights (and sometimes day) like I have! The onset of cooler weather also means that cold and flu season is coming!

Is your immune system ready? We often respond to illnesses defensively... waiting until we catch something before we take care of it. But there is another way... a way to go on the offensive and give your immune system a running start! The food we eat (or don't eat), our obsession with cleanliness, the frequency medications are prescribed, and the environmental toxins we are exposed to can lead to our bodies being run down, and our immune systems functioning below peak performance level.

In fact, it's pretty amazing that we have any immunity left! I'm thankful for the incredibly complex design of our bodies, which allows them to compensate and continue working, even in sub-optimal conditions. Here is a fun video that explains the workings of the immune system. But doesn't it seem like a good idea to support our bodies—and our immune systems—the best that we can? The good news is that there are ways to support our immune systems!  

  • Eat a diet rich in nourishing foods

  • Support the good microbes in your body and environment

  • Detoxify to give the inflammatory arm of the immune system a break

  • Use essential oils and herbs to support your body's natural defenses

Today let's talk about the first two, and next time we will talk about the other two.  

Nourishing Foods

Eating nourishing foods is a topic I talk about often. If you haven't heard much of what I have to say about this yet, you can check out some other posts like this one and this one. Today I'm going to share with you the nutrient dense foods that your immune system LOVES!

Your immune system is a very hungry organ. It is overseeing the entire body, and needs lots of little soldiers to work properly. For a strong, well-staffed immune system, the body needs to be well supplied with cholesterol, calcium, vitamin D, vitamin C, zinc, and more. These nutrients can be found in the same nutrient dense foods that I am always recommending... meat stock, butter, fermented cod liver oil (source), liver (you can get it in a capsule), caviar, egg yolks, full-fat yogurt or kefir, grass-fed beef, and some others. Important minerals can be found in whole salts (sources).

When these types of foods are consumed on a regular basis, the immune system will have enough building blocks to make itself strong. While you are increasing the amount of nutrient-dense foods you are eating, it's a good idea to decrease the amount of empty, processed foods you eat. These foods are mostly empty calories, and any food that contains processed sugar depresses the immune systems for hours after it's eaten. As you fill up with real, whole foods, phase any sugar-containing, processed food out of your diet.

Support Good Microbes

Another reason why our immune systems are struggling is because we have declared a war on microbes. Since the days of Louis Pasteur we have been sterilizing and pasteurizing everything in sight. Even if you don't take antibiotics, you are still getting exposed to them through the food you eat, the water you drink, and often even the soap you wash your hands with. Additionally we obsessively use hand sanitizer, bleach and other cleaners that kill 99.9% of germs. But these sanitizers aren't just killing germs.

They are killing the good microbes as well—microbes that keep balance, and even health, to our bodies and the world around us. Another theory emerged around the time of Pasteur, and with our growing knowledge of the human microbiome, it seems to be the more true of the two. Antoine Bechamp created the cellular theory, with the main hypothesis that it is the environment that causes disease, not the germ. A short recap of these two theories can be found here.

If Pastuer were right, then our bodies should do better and better as we "cleanse" and reduce the number of bacteria and other microbes. But we have found that the opposite is true. Research has shown that those people with fewer species of microbes in their gut are actually more prone to illness and disease, including chronic disease like obesity, autoimmunity and cancer. So stop killing things! Get rid of your antimicrobial soap and Clorox spray! When you need to clean your hands, wash them instead of sanitizing. And expose yourself to the good and helpful microbes that help keep the bad ones in check. you can do this by eating fermented foods, taking a probiotic, and getting into the dirt sometimes. Eating the nourishing foods we talked about will also support helpful microbes in your body.

That should get you started, but come back to learn about the other two ways you can support your immune system. Remember, the best defense is a good offense!

Onward!

Zucchini Bread {GAPS legal}

Zucchini... if there is one harvest that defines summer, it's zucchini.

Zucchini is great because of its versatility: it can be used hot or cold, baked or fried, and in soups, salads, breads, or even as a noodle substitute.

Today I want to share with you a recipe for a zucchini bread that is legal on the full GAPS diet, WAPF diet, Paleo diet and Whole30. I want you to remember (and take hope in) the fact that I am not primarily a chef. I am just average in the kitchen. If I can make this, so can you! This recipe is very forgiving—so try it!

There are a couple keys to this recipe that need to be followed. Don't shortcut them...they are what make this recipe forgiving, and the bread yummy! The first key is also the first step: fermenting the almond flour. Have you eaten baked goods made of almond flour that are dense and dry? Fermenting the flour creates a lighter, fluffier end product. But that's not all! Fermenting is one of the three processes that can be used to make nuts more digestible.

For more about soaking, sprouting or fermenting, watch this video.

The other key is using sour cream (you could also substitute in a full-fat yogurt) for the fat. As a cultured food, sour cream helps make the bread lighter as well.

Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups almond flour (organic preferred)

  • 1/2 cup whey (strained from yogurt or kefir)

  • 2 cups zucchini (grated and squeezed to remove the liquid)

  • 2-3 eggs (chicken or duck)

  • 1 tsp cinnamon

  • 1/4 tsp ginger

  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg

  • 1 tsp sea salt (source)

  • 1/2 cup sour cream

  • 2/3 cup date syrup (source)

Directions

24 hours (or more) before

Mix almond flour and whey together in a bow.l Cover and set on the counter for 24 hours

This fermentation, which takes place at room temperature, will change the texture of the "flour." At the end of 24 hours you will have something that resembles dough more than wet flour. This is a base that can be used for many recipes. It will keep in the fridge about a week, so many people make this ahead of time and keep it in their fridge for future use. With this step done ahead of time, you can pull it out, add ingredients, and have a fermented baked good in about an hour.

The Next Day

Preheat the oven to 350° F Grate more than 2 cups of zucchini. The zucchini is very wet, so squeeze it dry using a cloth or towel (you can see it in the picture below).

Next, measure 2 cups of the zucchini (dry, but not compressed) and mix it into the 24 hour fermented flour. Add 2-3 eggs (it depends on the size of your egg, those pictured are duck eggs, which are larger than chicken eggs).

Mix in the rest of the ingredients (sour cream, date syrup, salt and spices).

I used date paste instead of honey because cooking honey is thought to turn the honey toxic. You can also make your own date paste in a strong blender like a Vitamix.

Pour into a greased pan (I prefer lining mine with parchment paper, but this is optional).

Bake at 350° for 45-50 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean from the middle. Wait at least 10 minutes before cutting into the bread. This allows the steam to finish the cooking progress, and will make the texture of the bread better. Add butter, and enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. Your trust is important to me, and I only recommend products that I trust.


Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups almond flour (organic preferred)
  • 1/2 cup whey (strained from yogurt or kefir)
  • 2 cups zucchini (grated and squeezed to remove the liquid)
  • 2-3 eggs (chicken or duck)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1 tsp sea salt (source)
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2/3 cup date syrup (source)

instructions:

How to cook Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

24 hours (or more) before
  1. Mix almond flour and whey together in a bow.l Cover and set on the counter for 24 hours
  2. This fermentation, which takes place at room temperature, will change the texture of the "flour." At the end of 24 hours you will have something that resembles dough more than wet flour. This is a base that can be used for many recipes. It will keep in the fridge about a week, so many people make this ahead of time and keep it in their fridge for future use. With this step done ahead of time, you can pull it out, add ingredients, and have a fermented baked good in about an hour.
The Next Day
  1. Preheat the oven to 350° F Grate more than 2 cups of zucchini. The zucchini is very wet, so squeeze it dry using a cloth or towel (you can see it in the picture below).
  2. Next, measure 2 cups of the zucchini (dry, but not compressed) and mix it into the 24 hour fermented flour. Add 2-3 eggs (it depends on the size of your egg, those pictured are duck eggs, which are larger than chicken eggs).
  3. Mix in the rest of the ingredients (sour cream, date syrup, salt and spices).
  4. I used date paste instead of honey because cooking honey is thought to turn the honey toxic. You can also make your own date paste in a strong blender like a Vitamix.
  5. Pour into a greased pan (I prefer lining mine with parchment paper, but this is optional).
  6. Bake at 350° for 45-50 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean from the middle. Wait at least 10 minutes before cutting into the bread. This allows the steam to finish the cooking progress, and will make the texture of the bread better. Add butter, and enjoy!
Created using The Recipes Generator

Spring! And Natural Allergy Management

Spring has come to my neighborhood! Over the last week, things have been budding and growing. Green has been showing, and flowers blooming. The sounds of spring have been happening for awhile, but are now in full force—birds chirping, squirrels chattering, and children playing. I took an sunset tour around my neighborhood to enjoy the spring evening, and I want to share with you some of the pictures I took. Then keep reading for some natural ways to manage your spring allergies!

There is another way I know that spring is here… my allergies have started to flare. Since going through the GAPS diet, my allergies are mild compared to what they used to be, but they still cause minor irritation—enough that I need to address them. So today I am going to share with you what I do to manage my allergies naturally. But before we discuss management techniques, let’s review what allergies are. Allergy symptoms are a product of the immune system. And we can think of them as a signal from our body to let us know that something is going on. Basically, they signal two things:

The first is that an allergen (a protein chain that is usually referred to as an antigen) has bypassed the body’s protective mechanisms. When this happens, the body mounts a non-specific immune response (an inflammatory response) against that allergen. In this process, certain cells (called mast cells) are degranulated, and release things like histamine into the bloodstream. Histamine travels to receptor sites in the GI tract, respiratory tract and the skin. These receptors then trigger a further response to the allergen, and we see symptoms like hives, mucus production, and swelling.

The second is that our liver is unable to keep up with processing mediators (like histamine) that have been released in the inflammatory response. As we saw above, histamine triggers the symptoms we are accustomed to in an allergic reaction. Histamine is not a problem when it is being processed and removed by the liver fairly quickly. But when it continues to circulate (because the liver isn’t pulling it out fast enough) it will continue to cause unpleasant symptoms—sending you signals that your body needs some assistance.

Okay, now that we are on the same page about what allergy symptoms are, let’s talk about ways to support your body so you don't suffer from them! Again, these symptoms are signals that your body needs some help. So what can we do to help support the liver and immune system?

Feed it Fat

The immune system is a very hungry organ, and what it likes best to eat is fat! Especially the Vitamins A and D that it contains. These are both found in abundance in butter, as well as lard, fermented cod liver oil, and other animal fats. The cholesterol found in these fats also plays an important role, for it is cholesterol that helps the body repairdamage from inflammation (watch this video for more on this).

Eat Sauerkraut

There are two benefits to eating sauerkraut (or fermented cabbage any way). The first is the probiotic benefit. The root cause of allergies is a leaky gut. Bad gut flora has everything to do with this. (This is too much to discuss in this post, so if you have further questions, I recommend chapter 6 of my book Notes From a GAPS Practitioner.) So eating probiotics will help the allergy problem, both long-term and short-term. However, if you are unused to eating large amounts of sauerkraut, I recommend you work up to it slowly. The second benefit of sauerkraut is the high amount of Vitamin C available in it. Lacto-fermenting cabbage increased the bioavailability of Vitamin C by about 4 times. Our immune system also needs Vitamin C to function well. So consuming large amounts of sauerkraut is like taking Vitamin C daily (which you could take in other ways, like arceola cherry powder). I enjoy sauerkraut, and find that if I eat between 1-3 cups a day (broken up with meals, or as a snack), my allergy symptoms are fairly well managed. I generally feel that my itchy eyes and throat are calmed down within about 20 minutes of eating it.

Apply Lavender Essential Oil

This is my quick-acting go-to if my symptoms are overwhelming. Lavender is a powerful antihistamine. If I run into a situation where my allergies flare up quickly, like having a cat rub against me, or when the cottonwood trees are seeding, I pull out my lavender oil. There are several ways to use it. You can apply it topically near the area that is affected (best for skin issues) or on the bottoms of your feet (if you don’t like the smell). You can diffuse it, so you breathe it into your mucus membranes and calm the histamine response there. Or (if you have a pure and safe brand like the one I use), you can take it internally. I prefer to place a drop or two under my tongue and let it absorb sublingually. This is the quickest way to get it into the bloodstream. Lavender tastes about like it smells, but the quick relief I get far outweighs the bitter taste it leaves. I usually feel relief from my symptoms in 2-5 minutes, but for most people it may take 10-20 minutes to feel the effect.

Support Your Liver

There are ways to help the liver when it is overtaxed. First, reduce the amount of toxins you are asking the liver to process, thus adding to its workload. In the spring I am more careful about what I eat. There are some foods I have “graduated” to that can be too much for my body to handle when it also has to deal with extra histamines in my “allergy season.” In the same way, it is good to be cautious about other toxins from chemicals in the environment (or on our skin) that are overloading the body. It is also important to use other methods of detox, such as detox baths and juicing, to help remove toxins and thus reducing the workload of the liver. Finally, eating liver (consuming the animal organ that matches our struggling organ is always helpful) regularly can be helpful. If you don’t like it, you can take desiccated liver. And for a little extra support, I will sometimes take the Standard Process supplement Antronex.

Try Something New

I have not tried this yet because I just learned about it, but this season I am going to try lacto-fermenting honey! Most of us have heard that honey can help with allergies, but it turns out that lacto-fermenting the honey increases these benefits even more! I’m interested to see how it turns out, and if it helps. The honey does have to be local to have a strong effect, and I fortunately have a little honey left over from the year I tried beekeeping. If you want to learn more about it, I would recommend starting HERE.

If you have tried lacto-fermenting honey, found success with any of these natural means, or want to share other things you have found helpful with the community, then leave it in a comment below!  

Onward!

References: McCance, K. and Huether, S. (2006). Pathophysiology: The Biologic Basis for Disease in Adults and Children. Elsevier Mosby. Philadelphia, PA. Pg. 249-255. Lavender and the Nervous System. Koulivarnd, P. Ghadiri, M., Gorji, A. (September 4, 2012) Retrieved March 20, 2017 from https://www.hindawi.com/journals/ecam/2013/681304/

Raw Milk Chocolate Pudding

Some days don't you just miss pudding cups? I know I do.

Now you can make your own! The most frequent comment about this pudding (besides "yum", "delicious", and "mmm...") is that it tastes just like a chocolate pudding cup! This simple recipe is a wonderful treat for you and your family, and because it's made of real food ingredients it can be enjoyed without guilt.

Of course this, like all sweet items, should be enjoyed in moderation and not as a meal replacement. And if you are following a healing protocol, you will need to wait until significant gut healing has occurred before enjoying this.

A note for those on the GAPS diet: While this is technically (advanced) full GAPS legal, not everyone is able to tolerate raw milk, cream or cocoa. Listen to your body and only eat this when it is a good choice for you.

Enjoy this video, then scroll down for the recipe. We hope you enjoy it!

Raw Milk Chocolate Pudding

Recipe by Erin Goodin

Warm on stovetop (medium heat)

Heat to 95°F to activate the gelatin, then remove from heat

In a blender, combine

  • 2 cups raw milk

  • 1/2 cup raw honey

  • 3 egg yolks

  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder

  • heated mixture

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

Blend until combined

Pour into desired container(s)

Chill for 12-24 hrs in the fridge

Whipped Cream Topping

  • 2 cups cream

  • 2 TBS honey

Whip until stiff, then use to top the pudding

Enjoy!

Affiliate disclosure: There are affiliate links contained in the post. The small commission I receive helps to keep this blog going. I do not recommend products that I do not trust.


Raw Milk Chocolate Pudding

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

Raw Milk Chocolate Pudding
Whipped Topping
  • 2 cups cream
  • 2 TBS honey

instructions:

How to cook Raw Milk Chocolate Pudding

  1. Warm on stovetop (medium heat): 1 cup raw milk, 1 TBS gelatin (brand I recommend), 1/2 tsp sea salt (brands I recommend),  1 TBS butter.
  2. Heat to 95°F to activate the gelatin, then remove from heat
  3. In a blender, combine: 2 cups raw milk, 1/2 cup raw honey, 3 egg yolks, 1/4 cup cocoa powder, heated mixture, 1 tsp vanilla extract.
  4. Blend until combined
  5. Pour into desired container(s)
  6. Chill for 12-24 hrs in the fridge
  7. Whipped Cream Topping: 2 cups cream,  2 TBS honey.
  8. Whip until stiff, then use to top the pudding
  9. Enjoy!

NOTES:

Recipe by Erin Goodin
Created using The Recipes Generator

How to Shop Like Betty: Tips on Nutrient-Dense Shopping

In the last post we discussed the differences in food quality, and explored the intricate way God designed our senses to be able to taste, smell, and see the difference. But, as amazing as all this is, we hit a reality check.

We can't all grow our own garden vegetables, have our seafood overnighted, or raise a cow in the backyard. It can be a struggle to even afford purchasing these things.

And that's okay. Most of us are in the same boat.

While I still encourage people to think differently about food budget—considering it instead as part of your health-care budget, I understand that at some point, cash-flow is a limiting factor. You can only do the best you can, prioritizing the things that seem important to your body and family, and go from there.

I want to share a few tips with you. Ones that can help you put more nutrient-dense food on the table. Today let's talk about how to shop.

canstockphoto14919872.jpg

Nutrient-Dense Shopping:

  • Shop sales, coupon, or go to wholesale stores (like Costco), and buy in bulk when the food is a good price.

I actually specifically recommend Costco because of their conscientious sourcing, and their larger selection of organic items. This automatically leads to better quality food options. Buying in bulk, and on sale are also great ways to get things like coconut oil and sugar (to feed your SCOBY, of course), as well as non-grocery items like Epsom salt, soaps and shampoos.

  • Find out when your favorite organic-carrying grocery store marks things down for quick-sale.

Stores go through their produce, dairy and meat products on a regular basis in order to catch and mark-down food that is about to expire. Usually this is scheduled, and if you know the time and day you can show up soon after (or during) this mark-down period and get incredible deals! You can also check to see if there is a local discount grocery store, that takes almost out-of-date items and sells them at a large discount.

Produce: The small health food stores that I shop at usually put the older assorted produce in $2 bags. Often times it comes out to roughly a 90% discount! You have to be creative with using it, and be willing to give away food you may not be able to eat (like maybe potatoes, for example), but I often walk out of these stores with $15-30 worth of organic produce that cost me $4-6.

Meat: Similarly, stores mark down meat when it is nearing it's expiration date. Find out what days they go through the organic produce, and shop at that time. Again, I have found even better deals in smaller stores, where they have more to loose by throwing away food. And don't be afraid to buy frozen meat! Very few nutrients are lost when the meat is frozen. If it comes down to buying fresh commercial meat, or frozen natural or organic meat, the latter will definitely give you more nutrition for your buck.

canstockphoto41638296.jpg
  • Know when to spend your money: when quality really matters, or when it varies tremendously.

There are some foods that are more difficult to find on sale, and ones that I recommend paying more for. Many of these items can be purchased much "cheaper," but the quality ranges from very poor to very good, and you get what you pay for. Dairy products in particular are very manipulated by manufacturers, and should be bought with that in consideration.

Dairy: If you can get raw milk, then do it! Otherwise, I do not recommend consuming pasteurized milk unless it has been cultured, like in yogurt or cheese. Aside from milk, most dairy products tend to keep longer, and may be more difficult to find on sale. Organic is important here, because commercial cows are given many antibiotics and hormones that will come through the milk and affect you. Don't "buy cheap" in these areas, especially butter, as it may be a main source of cholesterol (fat) for you. Cream can be purchased at the store, and although it has been pasteurized (some more than others), it is more stable than milk, and is less affected by pasteurization. Cheese, yogurt and sour cream have all been cultured, and those active cultures are working hard to counteract the damaging effects of pasteurization.

Eggs: Deciding which eggs to buy will depend on your area. If you can't purchase them from a local farm (real free-range are better than store-bought organic), then choose your egg based on the color of the yolk, and the taste. The yolk should be bright yellow or orange, meaning the chickens have been out in the sun and may even be able to eat bugs and fresh greens. Never buy eggs from vegetarian-fed hens. Believe me, hens are not vegetarians! Eggs are another large source of cholesterol, and it's best to buy the best quality of eggs you can find (these are not always the most expensive).

canstockphoto13062197.jpg
  • Look for bulk ordering companies or clubs.

You don't have to join a CSA to get farm-fresh produce. There are companies like Azure Standard, Miller's Organic Farm, and others that send you meat and produce from a farm (maybe in another state) and deliver it to you. This is a great way to buy things that are more difficult to get, like lard, nuts or dried fruit. This can also be a good way to get non-grocery items.

I hope these tips help you make more nutrient-dense food purchases. What other ways have you found to make nutrient-dense food affordable? Share your knowledge with the community in the comments below. Happy shopping!

Onward!

Decadent Hot Chocolate

Winter is here in full force... the weather is cold, snow storms are common, and the evenings are dark and long. It's a great time to stay in, cuddle up in a blanket, and drink hot chocolate.

"Hot chocolate?" you ask. "I'm on (GAPS, WAPF, SCD, Paleo) and not eating processed food—how in the world can I drink hot chocolate?" Well, I'm about to tell you. I have also been without hot chocolate for a long time, but inspiration struck and I can now present you with an amazing hot chocolate recipe.

No really, it's amazing. Rich, thick, decadent, filling, indulging, chocolaty goodness.   

It even passed the skeptical, hot chocolate-loving teenage boy test.  

Which is a big deal.   And it's a nutrient-dense food!  

Are you ready?

Without further ado, here is the...

Decadent Hot Chocolate Recipe

*Legal on Paleo, SCD, WAPF, and Full GAPS (if tolerating milk and cocoa powder)

—Makes 2 large or 3 medium mugs of hot cocoa—

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups Milk (Raw)

  • 2 Eggs

  • 6-8 TBS Honey

  • 4 tsp Cocoa Powder

  • 1/8 tsp Sea Salt

  • 1/4 tsp Vanilla

Directions for raw milk hot chocolate:

Over low-medium heat, mix:

  • 2 cups milk

  • 2 eggs

  • 6-8 TBS honey

  • 1/8 tsp salt

Stir or whisk constantly:

Whisk over low to medium heat for about 5-8 minutes, until the mixture coats the back of a spoon (if you have ever made ice cream, this is the same process as making the base)

Remove From Heat:

When the spoon is coated, remove from the heat (or you will get milky scrambled eggs!)

Whisk in:

  • 1/4 tsp Vanilla

  • 4 tsp Cocoa powder

(in this picture we did this in a cup because we were experimenting... you should add these ingredients to the saucepan—it's much easier)

Whisk until frothy

Pour into mugs, filling each mug about 2/3 full

Finish filling the mugs by carefully pouring plain milk (warmed or cool) down the inside of the mug (so as not to disturb the foam on top)

Add a few GAPS marshmallows if desired

For an added option (adults only!) I recommend adding a little rum

Serve and enjoy!

...you can clean up the mess later..


Raw Milk Hot Chocolate

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 3 cups Milk (Raw)
  • 2 Eggs
  • 6-8 TBS Honey
  • 4 tsp Cocoa Powder
  • 1/8 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1/4 tsp Vanilla

instructions:

How to cook Raw Milk Hot Chocolate

  1. Over low-medium heat, mix:  cups milk, 2 eggs, 6-8 TBS honey, 1/8 tsp salt.
  2. Whisk over low to medium heat for about 5-8 minutes, until the mixture coats the back of a spoon (if you have ever made ice cream, this is the same process as making the base)
  3. When the spoon is coated, remove from the heat (or you will get milky scrambled eggs!)
  4. Whisk in: 1/4 tsp Vanilla, 4 tsp Cocoa powder
  5. (in this picture we did this in a cup because we were experimenting... you should add these ingredients to the saucepan—it's much easier)
  6. Whisk until frothy
  7. Pour into mugs, filling each mug about 2/3 full
  8. Finish filling the mugs by carefully pouring plain milk (warmed or cool) down the inside of the mug (so as not to disturb the foam on top)
  9. Add a few GAPS marshmallows if desired
  10. For an added option (adults only!) I recommend adding a little rum
  11. Serve and enjoy!
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Thanksgiving in October

[et_pb_section admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] There is something exciting and magical about Fall! I am part of a garden co-op, and we had our harvest feast last night! Everything (essentially) was from our garden and harvest, including the honey and eggs! What a feast we had--and it was great knowing that it was grown and picked (very) locally, and in season. [/et_pb_text][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Harvest-Feast.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_margin="||20px|" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_padding="10px|||" custom_padding_last_edited="on|tablet"] We actually had a tough year--a fungus on our sprouts, a late frost (in June), hail, bugs, an early freeze... yet the yield was exciting! I have enough winter squash to last me months; apples, plumbs and herbs to dry; tomatoes cooked and frozen; kale to make into chips; and salad to eat for weeks still!  This is on top of the fresh veggies we have been eating (as fast as possible) for the last 2 months. Colorado does have a short growing season, but with a good gardener (not me, I am just learning) and commitment to cover things during freak freezes, you can grow many wonderful things.   [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="on" use_custom_gutter="off" custom_padding="0px|||" custom_padding_last_edited="on|desktop" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="off" make_equal="off" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="off" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="off" column_padding_mobile="on"][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_margin="40px|||" custom_margin_last_edited="on|desktop" custom_padding="0px|||"] The bees had a hard time as well, but we still ended up with over 3 gallons of honey! And their busy work brought beautiful flowers, fruit, and vegetables! I am so thankful for them, and my friend who is doing bees with me, and is not afraid of them still (even though she got stung 9 times)!   [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="https://www.bewellclinic.net/wp-content/uploads/2016/09/Spinning-Honeycomb.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="off" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid" custom_margin="0px|||" custom_margin_last_edited="on|phone" /][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] Spinning the comb to remove honey [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] And so we were discussing last night that Thanksgiving should be in October in Colorado, when harvest is in here. Because it is then that we are remembering how much we have to be so thankful for! Even if you don't have a garden, take a moment to think about all the great and beautiful things around you--everything from changing leaves and the start of sweater weather, to holidays coming and routine re-appearing after the whirlwind-of-a-summer is over. So... what are you thankful for? Onward! [/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][/et_pb_section]