dairy

Citrus and Chocolate Fudge Made with Coconut

GAPS Legal Chocolate Peppermint Coconut Fudge and Citrus Coconut Fudge

The GAPS Legal Fudge is a delicious holiday recipe and easy to share with family and friends! This recipe comes together quickly, besides the melting of the coconut butter and oil. I like making this recipe on a snowy day because it’s fun to chill the pans in a snowbank! It makes me feel like a pioneer.

For the citrus fudge, you can use any citrus you like. I prefer orange. You can also use all shredded coconut if you like. I prefer a little crunch in my fudge and like to add the flakes.You can make these flavors on their own and keep them separate. However, I prefer the two flavors together.

To combine the flavors, make the chocolate peppermint fudge first and put it in the freezer for 10 minutes to chill rapidly while you make the citrus fudge. Once chilled, pour the citrus fudge over the top and chill again.The fudge keeps for quite a while and doesn’t melt easily at room temperature. Even so, storing in the fridge is best.Enjoy!

Chocolate Peppermint Coconut Fudge

Ingredients for chocolate peppermint coconut fudge

  • ½ cup coconut butter

  • ½ cup coconut oil

  • ½ cup cocoa powder

  • ½ cup honey

  • 2 tsp peppermint extract or 2 drops peppermint oil

  • 1 tsp vanilla extract

  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut

  • ¼ cup coconut flakes

Directions for chocolate peppermint coconut fudge

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Melt coconut butter on medium heat by adding water to the bottom of a pot and placing jar on top. Or add jar and water to crockpot and heat for two hours until melted.

Melt coconut oil in a separate pot. Crush coconut flakes into smaller pieces.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Combine coconut butter, coconut oil, cocoa powder, honey, peppermint, vanilla, shredded coconut and coconut flakes into a food processor.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Spread mixture into a pan.Chill for 30 minutes.

Add hot water to the sink. Float pan in mixture approx 1 minute until mixture releases from sides. Dip a knife in hot water then slice fudge into pieces.

How to Make Citrus coconut Fudge

Ingredients for citrus coconut fudge

  • ½ cup coconut butter

  • ½ cup coconut oil

  • ⅓ cup raw honey

  • 1 tbsp citrus zest

  • 2 tbs citrus juice

  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut

  • ¼ cup Coconut Flakes

Directions for citrus coconut fudge

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Melt coconut butter on medium heat by adding water to the bottom of a pot and placing jar on top. Or add jar and water to crockpot and heat for two hours until melted. Melt coconut oil in a separate pot.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Combine coconut butter, coconut oil, cocoa powder, honey, peppermint, and vanilla into a food processor.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Spread mixture into a pan.Chill for 30 minutes.

This GAPS Legal Coconut Fudge comes in two flavors, citrus and peppermint. You can make the flavors separately but I prefer them layered together. Use coconut butter, coconut oil and coconut flakes for a delicious gluten free, dairy free and GAPS legal fudge. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic

Add hot water to the sink. Float pan in mixture approx 1 minute until mixture releases from sides. Dip a knife in hot water then slice fudge into pieces.


Chocolate Peppermint Fudge

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ cup coconut butter
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • ½ cup cocoa powder
  • ½ cup honey
  • 2 tsp peppermint extract or 2 drops peppermint oil
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut
  • ¼ cup coconut flakes

instructions:

How to cook Chocolate Peppermint Fudge

  1. Melt coconut butter on medium heat by adding water to the bottom of a pot and placing jar on top. Or add jar and water to crockpot and heat for two hours until melted.
  2. Melt coconut oil in a separate pot. Crush coconut flakes into smaller pieces.
  3. Combine coconut butter, coconut oil, cocoa powder, honey, peppermint, vanilla, shredded coconut and coconut flakes into a food processor.
  4. Spread mixture into a pan.Chill for 30 minutes.
  5. Add hot water to the sink. Float pan in mixture approx 1 minute until mixture releases from sides. Dip a knife in hot water then slice fudge into pieces.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Citrus Coconut Fudge

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ cup coconut butter
  • ½ cup coconut oil
  • ⅓ cup raw honey
  • 1 tbsp citrus zest
  • 2 tbs citrus juice
  • 3/4 cup shredded coconut
  • ¼ cup Coconut Flakes

instructions:

How to cook Citrus Coconut Fudge

  1. Melt coconut butter on medium heat by adding water to the bottom of a pot and placing jar on top. Or add jar and water to crockpot and heat for two hours until melted. Melt coconut oil in a separate pot.
  2. Combine coconut butter, coconut oil, cocoa powder, honey, peppermint, and vanilla into a food processor.
  3. Spread mixture into a pan. Chill for 30 minutes.
  4. Add hot water to the sink. Float pan in mixture approx 1 minute until mixture releases from sides. Dip a knife in hot water then slice fudge into pieces.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Christmas Wreath Cookies {GAPS Legal}

It's the holiday season! More specifically, it's cookie season!   I love making, giving away (and eating) Christmas cookies. But it's been a long time since I have enjoyed many of the cookies I grew up making, so this year I decided I wanted to create real-food versions of some of my favorite Christmas cookie recipes.  

First up, Christmas Wreath cookies!

  This cookie is traditionally a mix of corn flakes, marshmallows, and butter. So let's look at the ingredients...

  • The butter is already a real food!

  • Marshmallows I have made before, modified from Mommypotamus' marshmallow recipe.

So all I had to do was figure out a substitution for the corn flakes (and see if the marshmallows actually work the same as the commercial variety).   Challenge accepted!

Christmas Wreath Cookies

Makes about 36 cookies (recipe can be halved)

Ingredients

For Marshmallows

  • 2 cups honey

  • 1 cup of filtered water

  • 2 tsp vanilla

  • 1 tsp sea salt

  • 6 TBS grass-fed beef gelatin

  • 1 cup of filtered water

For Wreath Cookies

  • Marshmallow paste (above)

  • 8 ounces organic butter

  • 14 cups coconut flakes (approximately 20 ounces)

  • Red hots (my homemade recipe)

  • Natural food coloring, blue and yellow packets (I used this one)

Directions

Place the coconut flakes in the oven at 200°

Toast the coconut until they are light brown—this makes the cookies crispier! When done, remove them from the oven Place in a large bowl, set aside.

Melt the butter in a saucepan over low heat When melted, remove from heat and set aside   Next, make the marshmallow paste. See recipe here.

Soften the gelatin

  • Add gelatin to 1 cup hot water

  • Stir and allow to to sit, keep warm (not on stove)

While gelatin is softening... Heat honey and water in a medium saucepan (medium to high heat), stirring frequently, until it reaches the soft ball candy stage (about 235°F).

If you don't have a thermometer, you can check by dripping the heated honey into a glass of cold water. When the candy forms a ball, it is ready!

When the honey has reached the soft ball stage, remove from heat. Add the heated mixture to the softened gelatin in a large bowl. Add vanilla.

Do these steps quickly, you don't want honey mixture to cool off too much!

Whisk the mixture using an electric mixer or stand mixer for about 10 minutes.

When the mixture is thick and looks like marshmallow paste, it's done!  

If you want marshmallows, you can stop here. Put the marshmallow paste in a greased glass 9x11 dish and allow to cool and dry for a 24-36 hrs. Then cut up and serve.  

But we are not stopping here! To make traditional Christmas wreath cookies you melt the marshmallows and turn them back into paste-which is what you just created!  

Next, stir the melted butter into the mixture. It will deflate the mixture somewhat, this is normal.

Mix in the blue and yellow food coloring packets. This will turn it green (not neon green—that's an artificial color). But when it's made into wreathes it does look green—although you're going to have to take my word for it!

Pour the marshmallow mixture into the bowl with the toasted coconut flakes. Mix until the flakes are coated.

Finally, form the warm mixture into wreath-shaped cookies on parchment paper.

Add decorative red hots as berries (see my homemade recipe) Allow to cool.

See, I told you they look green!

All that's left is to share and enjoy these delicious treats!

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. Your trust is important. I only recommend products I trust. 


Christmas Wreath Cookies

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

For Marshmallows
  • 2 cups honey
  • 1 cup of filtered water
  • 2 tsp vanilla
  • 1 tsp sea salt
  • 6 TBS grass-fed beef gelatin
  • 1 cup of filtered water
For Wreath Cookies
  • Marshmallow paste (above)
  • 8 ounces organic butter
  • 14 cups coconut flakes (approximately 20 ounces)
  • Red hots (my homemaderecipe)
  • Natural food coloring, blue and yellow packets (I used this one)

instructions:

How to cook Christmas Wreath Cookies

  1. Place the coconut flakes in the oven at 200°
  2. Toast the coconut until they are light brown—this makes the cookies crispier! When done, remove them from the oven Place in a large bowl, set aside.
  3. Melt the butter in a saucepan over low heat When melted, remove from heat and set aside Next, make the marshmallow paste. See recipe here.
  4. Soften the gelatin
  5. Add gelatin to 1 cup hot water
  6. Stir and allow to to sit, keep warm (not on stove)
  7. While gelatin is softening... Heat honey and water in a medium saucepan (medium to high heat), stirring frequently, until it reaches the soft ball candy stage (about 235°F).
  8. If you don't have a thermometer, you can check by dripping the heated honey into a glass of cold water. When the candy forms a ball, it is ready!
  9. When the honey has reached the soft ball stage, remove from heat. Add the heated mixture to the softened gelatin in a large bowl. Add vanilla.
  10. Do these steps quickly, you don't want honey mixture to cool off too much!
  11. Whisk the mixture using an electric mixer or stand mixer for about 10 minutes.
  12. When the mixture is thick and looks like marshmallow paste, it's done!
  13. If you want marshmallows, you can stop here. Put the marshmallow paste in a greased glass 9x11 dish and allow to cool and dry for a 24-36 hrs. Then cut up and serve.
  14. But we are not stopping here! To make traditional Christmas wreath cookies you melt the marshmallows and turn them back into paste-which is what you just created!
  15. Next, stir the melted butter into the mixture. It will deflate the mixture somewhat, this is normal.
  16. Mix in the blue and yellow food coloring packets. This will turn it green (not neon green—that's an artificial color). But when it's made into wreathes it does look green—although you're going to have to take my word for it!
  17. Pour the marshmallow mixture into the bowl with the toasted coconut flakes. Mix until the flakes are coated.
  18. Finally, form the warm mixture into wreath-shaped cookies on parchment paper.
  19. Add decorative red hots as berries (see my homemade recipe) Allow to cool.
  20. See, I told you they look green!
  21. All that's left is to share and enjoy these delicious treats!
Created using The Recipes Generator

Zucchini Bread {GAPS legal}

Zucchini... if there is one harvest that defines summer, it's zucchini.

Zucchini is great because of its versatility: it can be used hot or cold, baked or fried, and in soups, salads, breads, or even as a noodle substitute.

Today I want to share with you a recipe for a zucchini bread that is legal on the full GAPS diet, WAPF diet, Paleo diet and Whole30. I want you to remember (and take hope in) the fact that I am not primarily a chef. I am just average in the kitchen. If I can make this, so can you! This recipe is very forgiving—so try it!

There are a couple keys to this recipe that need to be followed. Don't shortcut them...they are what make this recipe forgiving, and the bread yummy! The first key is also the first step: fermenting the almond flour. Have you eaten baked goods made of almond flour that are dense and dry? Fermenting the flour creates a lighter, fluffier end product. But that's not all! Fermenting is one of the three processes that can be used to make nuts more digestible.

For more about soaking, sprouting or fermenting, watch this video.

The other key is using sour cream (you could also substitute in a full-fat yogurt) for the fat. As a cultured food, sour cream helps make the bread lighter as well.

Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

Ingredients

  • 2 1/2 cups almond flour (organic preferred)

  • 1/2 cup whey (strained from yogurt or kefir)

  • 2 cups zucchini (grated and squeezed to remove the liquid)

  • 2-3 eggs (chicken or duck)

  • 1 tsp cinnamon

  • 1/4 tsp ginger

  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg

  • 1 tsp sea salt (source)

  • 1/2 cup sour cream

  • 2/3 cup date syrup (source)

Directions

24 hours (or more) before

Mix almond flour and whey together in a bow.l Cover and set on the counter for 24 hours

This fermentation, which takes place at room temperature, will change the texture of the "flour." At the end of 24 hours you will have something that resembles dough more than wet flour. This is a base that can be used for many recipes. It will keep in the fridge about a week, so many people make this ahead of time and keep it in their fridge for future use. With this step done ahead of time, you can pull it out, add ingredients, and have a fermented baked good in about an hour.

The Next Day

Preheat the oven to 350° F Grate more than 2 cups of zucchini. The zucchini is very wet, so squeeze it dry using a cloth or towel (you can see it in the picture below).

Next, measure 2 cups of the zucchini (dry, but not compressed) and mix it into the 24 hour fermented flour. Add 2-3 eggs (it depends on the size of your egg, those pictured are duck eggs, which are larger than chicken eggs).

Mix in the rest of the ingredients (sour cream, date syrup, salt and spices).

I used date paste instead of honey because cooking honey is thought to turn the honey toxic. You can also make your own date paste in a strong blender like a Vitamix.

Pour into a greased pan (I prefer lining mine with parchment paper, but this is optional).

Bake at 350° for 45-50 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean from the middle. Wait at least 10 minutes before cutting into the bread. This allows the steam to finish the cooking progress, and will make the texture of the bread better. Add butter, and enjoy!

This post contains affiliate links. Your trust is important to me, and I only recommend products that I trust.


Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 1/2 cups almond flour (organic preferred)
  • 1/2 cup whey (strained from yogurt or kefir)
  • 2 cups zucchini (grated and squeezed to remove the liquid)
  • 2-3 eggs (chicken or duck)
  • 1 tsp cinnamon
  • 1/4 tsp ginger
  • 1/4 tsp nutmeg
  • 1 tsp sea salt (source)
  • 1/2 cup sour cream
  • 2/3 cup date syrup (source)

instructions:

How to cook Fermented Almond Flour Zucchini Bread

24 hours (or more) before
  1. Mix almond flour and whey together in a bow.l Cover and set on the counter for 24 hours
  2. This fermentation, which takes place at room temperature, will change the texture of the "flour." At the end of 24 hours you will have something that resembles dough more than wet flour. This is a base that can be used for many recipes. It will keep in the fridge about a week, so many people make this ahead of time and keep it in their fridge for future use. With this step done ahead of time, you can pull it out, add ingredients, and have a fermented baked good in about an hour.
The Next Day
  1. Preheat the oven to 350° F Grate more than 2 cups of zucchini. The zucchini is very wet, so squeeze it dry using a cloth or towel (you can see it in the picture below).
  2. Next, measure 2 cups of the zucchini (dry, but not compressed) and mix it into the 24 hour fermented flour. Add 2-3 eggs (it depends on the size of your egg, those pictured are duck eggs, which are larger than chicken eggs).
  3. Mix in the rest of the ingredients (sour cream, date syrup, salt and spices).
  4. I used date paste instead of honey because cooking honey is thought to turn the honey toxic. You can also make your own date paste in a strong blender like a Vitamix.
  5. Pour into a greased pan (I prefer lining mine with parchment paper, but this is optional).
  6. Bake at 350° for 45-50 minutes, or until toothpick comes out clean from the middle. Wait at least 10 minutes before cutting into the bread. This allows the steam to finish the cooking progress, and will make the texture of the bread better. Add butter, and enjoy!
Created using The Recipes Generator

How to Shop Like Betty: Tips on Nutrient-Dense Shopping

In the last post we discussed the differences in food quality, and explored the intricate way God designed our senses to be able to taste, smell, and see the difference. But, as amazing as all this is, we hit a reality check.

We can't all grow our own garden vegetables, have our seafood overnighted, or raise a cow in the backyard. It can be a struggle to even afford purchasing these things.

And that's okay. Most of us are in the same boat.

While I still encourage people to think differently about food budget—considering it instead as part of your health-care budget, I understand that at some point, cash-flow is a limiting factor. You can only do the best you can, prioritizing the things that seem important to your body and family, and go from there.

I want to share a few tips with you. Ones that can help you put more nutrient-dense food on the table. Today let's talk about how to shop.

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Nutrient-Dense Shopping:

  • Shop sales, coupon, or go to wholesale stores (like Costco), and buy in bulk when the food is a good price.

I actually specifically recommend Costco because of their conscientious sourcing, and their larger selection of organic items. This automatically leads to better quality food options. Buying in bulk, and on sale are also great ways to get things like coconut oil and sugar (to feed your SCOBY, of course), as well as non-grocery items like Epsom salt, soaps and shampoos.

  • Find out when your favorite organic-carrying grocery store marks things down for quick-sale.

Stores go through their produce, dairy and meat products on a regular basis in order to catch and mark-down food that is about to expire. Usually this is scheduled, and if you know the time and day you can show up soon after (or during) this mark-down period and get incredible deals! You can also check to see if there is a local discount grocery store, that takes almost out-of-date items and sells them at a large discount.

Produce: The small health food stores that I shop at usually put the older assorted produce in $2 bags. Often times it comes out to roughly a 90% discount! You have to be creative with using it, and be willing to give away food you may not be able to eat (like maybe potatoes, for example), but I often walk out of these stores with $15-30 worth of organic produce that cost me $4-6.

Meat: Similarly, stores mark down meat when it is nearing it's expiration date. Find out what days they go through the organic produce, and shop at that time. Again, I have found even better deals in smaller stores, where they have more to loose by throwing away food. And don't be afraid to buy frozen meat! Very few nutrients are lost when the meat is frozen. If it comes down to buying fresh commercial meat, or frozen natural or organic meat, the latter will definitely give you more nutrition for your buck.

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  • Know when to spend your money: when quality really matters, or when it varies tremendously.

There are some foods that are more difficult to find on sale, and ones that I recommend paying more for. Many of these items can be purchased much "cheaper," but the quality ranges from very poor to very good, and you get what you pay for. Dairy products in particular are very manipulated by manufacturers, and should be bought with that in consideration.

Dairy: If you can get raw milk, then do it! Otherwise, I do not recommend consuming pasteurized milk unless it has been cultured, like in yogurt or cheese. Aside from milk, most dairy products tend to keep longer, and may be more difficult to find on sale. Organic is important here, because commercial cows are given many antibiotics and hormones that will come through the milk and affect you. Don't "buy cheap" in these areas, especially butter, as it may be a main source of cholesterol (fat) for you. Cream can be purchased at the store, and although it has been pasteurized (some more than others), it is more stable than milk, and is less affected by pasteurization. Cheese, yogurt and sour cream have all been cultured, and those active cultures are working hard to counteract the damaging effects of pasteurization.

Eggs: Deciding which eggs to buy will depend on your area. If you can't purchase them from a local farm (real free-range are better than store-bought organic), then choose your egg based on the color of the yolk, and the taste. The yolk should be bright yellow or orange, meaning the chickens have been out in the sun and may even be able to eat bugs and fresh greens. Never buy eggs from vegetarian-fed hens. Believe me, hens are not vegetarians! Eggs are another large source of cholesterol, and it's best to buy the best quality of eggs you can find (these are not always the most expensive).

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  • Look for bulk ordering companies or clubs.

You don't have to join a CSA to get farm-fresh produce. There are companies like Azure Standard, Miller's Organic Farm, and others that send you meat and produce from a farm (maybe in another state) and deliver it to you. This is a great way to buy things that are more difficult to get, like lard, nuts or dried fruit. This can also be a good way to get non-grocery items.

I hope these tips help you make more nutrient-dense food purchases. What other ways have you found to make nutrient-dense food affordable? Share your knowledge with the community in the comments below. Happy shopping!

Onward!