Real Food Recipes

Chocolate Fudge Sauce

Ingredients for Chocolate Fudge Sauce

  • 1 ¼  cup cocoa powder

  • 1 cup honey

  • ½ cup Cocoa Butter

  • ½ tsp salt

  • ¾ cup water

Directions for Chocolate Fudge Sauce

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In a small pot, combine cocoa powder, honey, salt, and water. Mix together. Add in cocoa butter.

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Bring to a boil. Simmer for five minutes until sauce thickens. Stir constantly to ensure no lumps.

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Let sauce cool slightly and serve immediately over ice cream!

Fruit Sauce Topping for Ice Cream

Making a fruit sauce topping like a strawberry or blackberry sauce is very easy! It’s a simple process and you can swap for any flavor you’d like.

You can also use this sauce to top yogurt if you don’t have homemade ice cream on hand.

Ingredients for Fruit Sauce

  • 1 heaping cup of frozen fruit (I used strawberries)

  • Filtered Water

  • 2 tsp Lemon juice

  • Honey (optional)

Directions for Fruit Sauce

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Add heaping cup of frozen fruit to pot.

Add enough water to cover the bottom of the pot.

When strawberries are soft, mash them with a fork or masher.

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Leave the strawberries or add a little honey once you’ve removed it from the heat to make the sauce extra sweet. I skipped this step for my sauce as I find the fruit sweet enough.

GAPS Legal Alcohol Free Maraschino Cherry Substitue

One of the few sweet commercial treats that I miss is maraschino cherries. I loved them in Shirley Temples, or chocolate covered cordial cherries. I was even known to eat them straight out of the jar.

The ingredients in the commercially available products are so horrific that I haven’t been tempted to try them in the past. But when looking for what to top my homemade vanilla ice cream with, I wondered if there was a way to make my own. I stumbled upon this recipe from Real Food Whole Health which uses real ingredients to make maraschino cherries and I was sold. I’ve modified the recipe a little to make it GAPS Legal on the full GAPS Diet by removing the sugar and swapping the kind of cherry juice I used. These cherries are also alcohol free, unlike many other recipes I found to make your own maraschino cherries.

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The most labor intensive part of this recipe is in pitting the cherries. If you don’t have a cherry pitter, like I do not, try a straw or a chop stick to remove the pits. I found the easiest way to do it was to remove the stems, poke a hole in the top of the cherry, and then push the pit out the top hole from the bottom.

If you’re not making this recipe when cherries are in season, you can use frozen whole cherries with the pits removed. 

Ingredients for GAPS Legal “Maraschino” Cherries

1 cup organic, unsweetened Black Cherry Juice,  I used Lakewood Pure Black Cherry juice

1 cup filtered water

2 organic whole cinnamon sticks

3 Tbsp lemon juice

16 oz sweet red cherries, pitted

1 Tbsp pure almond extract

Directions for GAPS Legal “Maraschino” Cherries

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In a sauce pan, combine cherry juice, water, cinnamon sticks and lemon juice.  Bring to a low simmer.

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Pit your cherries while the sauce is simmering.

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Pour sauce over the cherries. Add in almond extract. This is the important piece because it gives them that distinct smell!

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Let cool on the counter. Cover tightly and keep in the fridge.

How to Make GAPS Legal Ice Cream

I discovered this delicious ice cream years and years ago from an old ice cream maker recipe book. This is really making a custard base which makes it thick and creamy and allows you to not have to add so many filler ingredients. 

This is a full GAPS Legal ice cream because it has whole milk. You could try it with just cream and eat it earlier on the protocol. This ice cream is a rich treat but should be eaten with no guilt! It has very simple ingredients - milk, eggs, cream, honey, and optional vanilla extract. Any flavoring can be added to this ice cream base including chocolate or strawberries - you’re only limited by your imagination! What flavor combination is your favorite?

A few tips on how to make your own simple ice cream:

For best results, do the mixture the night before and let it chill in the freezer for at least eight hours. 

If you can’t find raw milk near you, you can use non homogenized organic milk as a less preferred but still acceptable alternative.


Ingredients for GAPS Legal Ice Cream

  • 2 cups Milk

  • 3 Eggs

  • 2 cups Cream

  • ½ cup Honey

  • 2 tsp. Vanilla Extract


Directions for GAPS Legal Ice Cream

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Add the milk and eggs to a pot.

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Whisk eggs immediately. If your milk gets too hot before you add your eggs, you will end up with very milky scrambled eggs! I prefer to start mixing with a fork and then whisk.

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Once the mixture is warm, add the honey. Mix with a whisk and fork.

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Leave mixture on low to medium low heat and stir constantly but not consistently until it thickens. The mixture is thick enough when it coats a spoon. 

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Add to a large enough bowl that will also have room to accommodate the cream. If there are scrambled egg pieces or harder pieces of milk in the pot, leave them in! You just want all the creamy goodness.

Cover and cool in the fridge for 20 - 30 minutes.

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Add your cream and vanilla.

Put the mixture back in the fridge and allow to cool completely overnight.

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Add mixture into an ice cream maker.

Once mixture starts to resemble ice cream, you can remove it from the maker. It will resemble soft serve. If you’d like harder ice cream, leave the mixture in the freezer for a few hours.

Enjoy with your favorite toppings!

Gluten Free GAPS Legal Onion Rings

As I’ve been healing and able to eat a larger variety of food, my taste buds have been seeking new and exciting tastes and I’ve found myself wanting to experiment more with cooking. These onion rings are my first foray into creating GAPS Legal fried foods.

My curiosity in figuring out if I could create fried food that was GAPS Legal was spurred by my new favorite YouTube channel, 18th Century Cooking by John Townsend. This sent my mind spinning on if I could create GAPS legal fried foods.

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These onion rings are legal on the GAPS Diet at stage 4! You can reserve the fat you use for frying to use again, as long as you don’t burn your fat.

Feel free to add additional flavors to the batter as you’d like!

Ingredients for Onion Rings:

  • Onions

  • 1 cup Fermented Almond Flour (see recipe)

  • 3 Eggs

  • 1 pint Lard (see recipe or store bought Fat Works)

  • 1 tsp Salt

  • Pepper


Directions for Onion Rings:

Heat lard in a pan on low heat. Be mindful of your fat because if it heats too fast, it will burn and you will have to throw it out and start over.

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Scramble three eggs in a shallow bowl with salt and pepper. Add in almond flour.

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Slice onion into thick rounds. Separate them into individual layers.

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Working directly next to the pan with lard, dunk your onion rounds piece by piece in the batter. Then place directly into the lard.

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Cook, turning as needed until they are golden brown in color.

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Remove onions when they are golden brown. Drain off excess oil or the onion rings will get mushy.

If the onion rings are not salty enough, salt them to taste.

Enjoy!


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Roasted Spaghetti Squash for Spaghetti Night

Roasted spaghetti squash has long been a favorite of mine, even before I started the GAPS Diet. Spaghetti squash is unique to others in the squash family because of its texture. It’s meaty insides look more like long strands of spaghetti and it has a less pureed texture than acorn squash or zucchini. This makes spaghetti squash  a great pasta alternative and so easy to prepare. All you need to do is cut it open, clean it out, slice it and forget it.

Spaghetti squash is GAPS Legal! You can add it to your soups on the first stage of GAPS. If you are on Stage Four of the GAPS Diet, you can eat it fried or baked.

You can use the spaghetti squash as a spaghetti alternative for white or red sauce. I also like to refry it and warm the spaghetti squash up in butter with lots of sauce (this is a great comfort food to support my body when it’s stressed.)

Ingredients for Roasted Spaghetti Squash

  • Spaghetti Squash

Directions for Roasted Spaghetti Squash

Preheat oven to 400.

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Slice spaghetti squash in half lengthwise.

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Remove seeds and strings in center. You can compost the seeds but you might get lots of volunteer spaghetti squash seedlings. (Which is not necessarily a bad thing.)

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Roast in the oven for 35 minutes to an hour. It depends on the size of your squash. I like my squash to be very soft and well cooked. This is also important for the GAPS Diet to have well cooked vegetables.

Check your squash after 35 minutes to see if they are softened and squishy. They should not be mush, but should feel much softer.

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When they are soft, remove them from the oven. If you need your squash to cool faster, you can flip them over. I prefer to keep them with the middle side down so they continue while they cool.

Check your spaghetti squash with a fork to see if it is done. If not, cook for a while longer.

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Once the spaghetti squash is cooked, remove the insides of the squash by scraping a fork along the insides.


Ways to Eat Eggs on the GAPS Diet

Dr. Natasha recommends that a child eats between three and six egg yolks a day and an adult should eat six to twelve. You may consume the whites with this if you are tolerating them or simply use the yolk only.

Egg whites are best eaten cooked. They are very detoxifying when they’re raw and when they’re raw, they require a lot of things to properly digest them. All the necessary things needed for digestion are in egg yolks so it’s important to consume the egg whites and egg yolks at the same time. Egg yolks are best eaten raw or very lightly cooked. This keeps the fragile nutrients inside egg yolks intact.

If you are having digestive issues, you should eat egg whites cooked only. After you have healed, you can consume raw egg whites.*

*Eating uncooked or raw eggs or feeding raw eggs to your pets can pose a risk to your health.

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How to Poach an Egg in Meat Stock

How to Make the Best Scrambled Eggs

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How to Make a Soft or Hard Boiled Egg

How to Make the Best Omelette

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How to Make Russian Custard

How to Make Hollandaise Sauce

How to Make Mayo Free Deviled Eggs Two Ways

 

How to Make the Perfect Hard Boiled and Soft Boiled Eggs

Egg whites are best eaten cooked. They are very detoxifying when they’re raw and when they’re raw, they require a lot of things to properly digest them. All the necessary things needed for digestion are in egg yolks so it’s important to consume the egg whites and egg yolks at the same time. Egg yolks are best eaten raw or very lightly cooked. This keeps the fragile nutrients inside egg yolks intact.

If you are having digestive issues, you should eat egg whites cooked only. After you have healed, you can consume raw egg whites.*

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Dr. Natasha recommends that a child eats between three and six egg yolks a day and an adult should eat six to twelve. You may consume the whites with this if you are tolerating them or simply use the yolk only.

There are multiple recipes for using egg whites only or you can feed them to your dog or cat.

*Eating uncooked or raw eggs or feeding raw eggs to your pets can pose a risk to your health.

Keeping hard boiled eggs on hand is a great and easy protein on the go! If you want to take your hard boiled eggs one step further, check out my recipe on making mayo free deviled eggs.

Directions for Hard Boiled Eggs

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Fill a medium saucepan with cold water.

Add eggs.

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Bring eggs to a boil and cook for 5-6 minutes covered.

Remove eggs from heat.

Let set for 5 minutes.

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Test if your egg is hard boiled by removing one from the pan and spinning it. A hard boiled egg will spin upright if the yolk is hard.

Rinse the eggs under cold water or place them in an ice bath.

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Tap the end of the egg and peel the shell off. Enjoy! Try these Mayo Free Deviled Eggs 2 Ways with your Hard Boiled Eggs.


I love soft boiled eggs! It makes me feel like royalty whenever I eat them. The best part of this fancy seeming dish is it’s actually very simple to make!

Directions for Soft Boiled Eggs

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Add filtered water to a pot. Bring water to a boil.

Once water is boiling, add eggs.

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Boil for 5 to 6 minutes.

Rinse under cold water or add to an ice bath.

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Tap one end of the egg and peel half of the egg. Scoop out the inside and enjoy!

Eggs Poached in Stock

Eggs poached in stock  was a new food for me when I started the GAPS Diet. It quickly became one of my favorite breakfasts that I am still enjoying. Sometimes, I poach an entire egg in the stock but I often I simply poach the yolks in stock.

Poaching your eggs in stock is great on cold winter’s days. It really helps you get going and warms you right off! It’s also a great way to get in your stock for the day in the summer, as it’s often cool enough in the mornings still to enjoy a warm beverage.

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I’ve always liked over easy eggs so I enjoy runny yolks. If you don’t like runny yolks, you can poach your eggs longer, or if you are poaching in your mug, you can break the yolk in the mug. The warmth of the soup will help to cook the yolk but very gently, which will help to leave much of the beneficial enzymes of the yolks intact.

Egg whites are best consumed cooked and egg yolks are best consumed raw. This is for ease of digestion as well as full nutrient potential.

You can use any stock of your choice to poach your eggs in. I had chicken stock on hand when making this recipe so I used that! Be sure to salt your eggs in the stock generously while cooking them and after.

Ingredients to Make Eggs Poached in Stock

  • 2 cups of Your Choice of Stock

  • 1-2 Eggs

  • Salt and pepper

Directions for Eggs Poached in Stock:

Bring two cups of stock to a boil. Add a generous shake of salt.

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Once stock is rapidly boiling, use a spoon to create a swirling vortex.

To the vortex, break in one to two eggs.

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Move them gently off the bottom, where they will settle.

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When your yolk gets to your desired firmness, remove the egg or pour the entire thing into a bowl or mug. This takes anywhere between 3 to 5 minutes.


GAPS Diet Stage 1 Modification: If you are on Stage 1 of the GAPS Diet, this modification will make this recipe legal.

Bring a mug’s worth of stock to a boil.

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Once the stock is boiling, add it to a mug.

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To the mug, add one to three egg yolks.

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I like to let them warm for a couple minutes. Then, I pop one entire egg yolk into my mouth, whole.  Others prefer to break the egg in the mug and stir it around. This only lightly cooks the egg yolk.

How to Make the Best Omelette

I have fond memories of omelettes!  I lived in Guatemala doing mission work for four months when I was 18. During my time there, we took a trip and stayed at a nice hotel. We had a gourmet breakfast with omelettes, complete with the freshest vegetables and fresh eggs. The skill of the chefs was amazing to watch.  It was some of the best food I had ever eaten! Whenever I make omelettes at home now, I think fondly back on that memory. Making an omelette in a cast iron pan is very different from what I experienced in that restaurant but it’s still a delicious and filling meal any time of the day.

You can use the suggested vegetables or any that you have on hand. Making an omelette in the morning is a great way to use up any vegetables that you have leftover from dinner the night before. In general, eggs, peppers, tomatoes, and spinach make great omelettes.

You can also had ham, bacon, or pieces of chicken into your omelette if you’d like. I prefer the simplicity of just vegetables in mine. Cheese is another great ingredient to add to an omelette. If you are cooking in a cast iron pan, which I recommend, wait to add your cheese until your omelette is ready to be folded. The heat of the omelette will melt the cheese and you won't have gooey strings of cheese in your cast iron.

Cooking your omelette can go quick so pre-slicing all the vegetables you want to use before you start heating the fat or cooking the eggs is important for timing! If you wash any of your vegetables, make sure you dry them completely before adding them to your omelette.

This recipe makes 1 very large omelette that can easily be split between two people. It's an especially great recipe if you're preparing food for multiple family members at a time, especially little ones! It's a one pan solution that will feed many.

Easy Omelette Breakfast on GAPS

Ingredients for a GAPS Friendly Omelette

  • 1 tbsp Lard or butter

  • 3 Eggs

  • 1 ½ tbsp Water

  • ¼ Red Bell Pepper

  • ¼ Green Bell Pepper

  • ¼ Onion

  • 1 Small Tomato

  • 1 Handful of Spinach

Directions for a GAPS Friendly Omelette

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Chop all vegetables you will add to your meal before you start heating your pan. Try to keep pieces as uniform as possible so they cook quickly.

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Heat your fat in a pan.

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Add spinach to pan and saute until soft.

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Meanwhile, crack three eggs into a dish. Scramble the eggs quickly with a fork.

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Add all other vegetables except tomatoes. Add a few shakes of salt and cook for five minutes.

When your vegetables are soft, add the tomatoes.

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After five minutes, add the eggs. Stir to incorporate the vegetables. Try to leave a little fat on the bottom of the pan, which can be difficult.

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Once your eggs are incorporated, turn the stove to low heat and place a cover over the top of the eggs.

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As your eggs start to harden, help them pull away from the sides of the pan by loosening them with a fork. This helps release some fat which will make it easier to remove the omelette from the pan once it is done.

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When eggs are set, transfer to a plate and fold over. Help loosen the omelette from the pan with a fork.

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Top with what you’d like! I like sour cream on my omelettes but you could add salsa or avocado.

How to Make the Ultimate Scrambled Eggs

Light, fluffy scrambled eggs are the starter to so many great dishes and an easy addition to any meal. For me, having access to farm fresh eggs means I make scrambled eggs a lot! They're quick for when I'm on the go. It's simple enough to make decent scrambled eggs.

There’s a way to take your scrambled eggs over the top. It transforms them from just ok eggs to the creamiest, dreamiest eggs you've ever had. It’s by playing a little game I like to play called “See how much fat you can get your eggs to absorb.” Hint: scrambled eggs can absorb a LOT of fat!

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You can use the animal fat of your choice in this recipe; I prefer the taste of butter but anything you have on hand will take your scrambled eggs over the top.

Plain old scrambled eggs can be dressed up lots of different ways! You can keep it simple with just salt and pepper, add salsa or sauerkraut or sour cream, or if you have a hankering for something sweet, try a drizzle of honey or date syrup over the top. I find this last one especially helpful if I need a little get up and go in the morning. It’s just enough sugar to kick start my energy levels for the day. If you are able to tolerate grains, you can have a nice piece of sourdough bread on the side.

How do you like your scrambled eggs?

The Best Scrambled Eggs on the GAPS Diet

Ingredients for Scrambled Eggs

  • 4 tbsp Butter or Lard

  • 2 Eggs

Directions for scrambled eggs

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Add your animal fat to a cast iron pan and melt on medium heat. If it doesn’t look like you have enough fat in your pan, feel free to add more!

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Crack two eggs into a bowl or directly into the pan if you're in a hurry and don't mind a little shell that might end up in your eggs.

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Scramble them with a fork or whisk and add them into the melted fat.

Stir quickly to mix the fat and the eggs together.

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Keep stirring, about two or three minutes, until your eggs look set.

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Serve and enjoy!

How to Properly Caramelize Onions

Caramelized onions are an amazing supporting food because they are high in vitamin C, calcium, and quercetin. It’s especially helpful for sore throats but is an excellent food to eat anytime you are starting to feel under the weather! (Check out more of my helpful tips for caring for yourself when you’re sick here.)

I recommend a whole onion per person because the onions will reduce in size. You want to use a lot of animal fat with this recipe! I like both butter or lard, so whatever you happen to have on hand is ok. The fat is also great for you while you’re sick. Make sure you add enough salt for the added minerals, which is also very important when you’re ill.

White or yellow onions work for this recipe. I prefer the yellow onions and often have them on hand so that is what I usually use.

For great caramelized onions, make sure your heat is on low. This is a food that is best with patience - and burnt with impatience. Allow 20 - 30 minutes of cooking time to get really good caramelized onions. You can cook multiple onions at a time as long as you are using a large enough pan. If your entire family is sick, you can make a batch for everyone in about the same amount of time as cooking just one.

When slicing your onions, you want to slice them in short slices. Don’t give into the temptation of dicing your onions! Even if it seems they will cook faster, you’ll most likely end up with a burnt or mushy dish.

Make sure you don’t crowd your pan of onions or they won’t properly caramelize. Above is the maximum amount of onions I would put in one pan.

Caramelized onions should be sweet! They shouldn’t really taste like onions at all when they’re finished! As they cook, take a taster. If it still tastes like onions, keep stirring.

Dr Natasha recommends topping a caramelized onion with a little olive oil and a couple fried eggs. (Again fried in plenty of fat.) This is a very filling meal that’s amazing when you’re sick.

However, you don’t need to be sick to enjoy this nourishing food! It can be very soothing when you’ve had a long day and are needing a comfort food.

Ingredients for Caramelized Onions:

  • 2-3 Tbsp Fat of Your Choice Per Onion

  • Onion (1 Per Person)

  • Salt (The amount of salt will vary if you’re using salted butter or unsalted lard.)

Directions for Caramelized Onions:

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Slice the ends of your onion and peel. Put the peels and “extras” into a bag for use in stock later.

Cut the onion in half. Then cut into half again.

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Slice the onion so long strips form.

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Start your pan heating on medium high and add the fat of your choice. Heating your pan before your onion is sliced will result in a pan that is too hot.

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Add your onions to the pan. Stir to coat in the fat.

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Cook onions over medium heat, stirring every few minutes.

When they are nearing translucency (about 25 ish minutes) add a little salt if you are not using salted butter. Even if you are using salted butter, adding a little extra salt will help them break down.

Make sure everyone salts their onions to taste once the onions are on their plates!

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Your onions are done when they are golden brown. Enjoy them on their own or as part of a larger meal.

How to Make Cabbage Tonic

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. This cabbage tonic can be taken from the beginning of the Intro Diet of GAPS. Use this tonic daily to help change your gut flora. As with all probiotic foods, make sure you begin with only a small amount, about a tablespoon at a time, keeping an eye out for symptoms of die off. If none are present, you can continue gradually increasing your daily amount and the frequency that you consume this tonic throughout the day.

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. This cabbage tonic can be taken from the beginning of the Intro Diet of GAPS. Use this tonic daily to help change your gut flora. As with all probiotic foods, make sure you begin with only a small amount, about a tablespoon at a time, keeping an eye out for symptoms of die off. If none are present, you can continue gradually increasing your daily amount and the frequency that you consume this tonic throughout the day.

When you do ferments, your intention and energy really does affect the taste of the ferments. If you’re stressed, it will show in the food. Do ferments at a time that you’re relaxed and enjoying being in the kitchen. If this is not your mindset, take a couple minutes to reset, thinking about how this work is bringing such amazing health and healing to your body and your family. After your mindset is set, smile and preparing your ferment!

When doing ferments, it is important to hand wash your jars. A lot of dishwashers leave a film of soap, even if you’re using a natural soap. Make sure you rinse your jar well with hot water. It’s not necessary to sterilize your jar; we’re not canning. Fermentation creates a live food that will take care of the bad bacteria.

Tidbit from Nourishing Traditions: “Add ¼ - ½ tsp cayenne pepper to 4 ounces of cabbage tonic for a gargle and sore throat remedy.

This recipe is based on the Nourishing Traditions cookbook by Sally Fallon on page 614.

Ingredients for Cabbage Tonic:

  • ¼ Organic Green Cabbage

  • 1 tsp Sea Salt

  • ¼ Cup Whey

  • Filtered Water

Directions for Cabbage Tonic:

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Shred cabbage finely with a knife. You want small even pieces so it ferments evenly. (Similar to cutting onions for even cooking.)

Add cabbage and salt to a bowl.

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Using your hands, squish the cabbage for about a minute.

Let the cabbage sit for five minutes.

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Squish the cabbage again for a minute.

Put cabbage in a 2 quart jar with whey.

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Add enough water to fill the container.

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Cover tightly.

Leave at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to the fridge.

How to Properly Soak Oatmeal

Oatmeal can be a good alternative to eggs as a breakfast in the morning, when eaten with plenty of fat like butter. There’s nothing wrong with eating oats, properly prepared, as long as your gut can handle it.

Oats are not part of the GAPS Diet but once you graduate to the well diet recommendations of the Weston A Price Foundation, this is a great breakfast for a cold morning.

I like to add raisins, butter, and a little sweetener, either honey, maple syrup, or date syrup, to my oatmeal.

Properly prepared oatmeal includes soaking it overnight. When you do this, it becomes a quick breakfast food to make in the morning.

You can be dairy free and still eat oatmeal! You can use lemon juice or vinegar in place of whey. If you can tolerate whey, this is the preferred way to consume oatmeal.

Your oats don’t need to be steel cut but you want whole oats. Steel cut or whole rolled oats are fine for this recipe but not quick oats. Quick oats are not whole; they are processed to cook more quickly and have often have preservatives on them.

This is based off the recipe in the Nourishing Traditions book by Sally Fallon.

Ingredients for Nourishing Traditions Oatmeal:

  • 1 1/2 Cups Warm Filtered Water

  • 1 Cup Gluten Free, GMO Free Oats

  • 4 tbsp Whey, Yogurt, Kefir, Buttermilk, Vinegar or Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp sea salt

Directions for Nourishing Traditions Oatmeal:

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Add oats, whey, warm water and sea salt to a bowl.

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Stir to combine.

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Cover and leave on your kitchen counter overnight or for 8 to 12 hours.

How to Ferment Almond Flour

Fermenting Almond Flour for Proper Digestion

Any seed wants to be a plant. Seeds include nuts, seeds, beans, and grains. To protect itself, a seed has phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. These substances attack the body of the animal that ate the seed, preventing the digestion of the seed. This is why we see whole seeds in bird poop.

Manually grinding seeds into flours does nothing to negate these enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. We may not necessarily see whole seeds in our stools but we don’t need to for our bodies to experience the effects of these substances. Inflammation, poor absorption of foods, and leaky gut are some of the effects on our bodies of eating seeds that are not properly prepared. To learn more about properly preparing grains, check out my video.

How to Prepare Grains Properly

When we properly prepare our grains however, we begin the germination process, which changes the seeds chemical structure. It neutralizes the anti-nutrients and enzyme inhibitors, and the seed prepares to bring life. When we eat a seed in this state, it’s nutrients are available to us and it brings life to our bodies.  

All seeds can be prepared in three ways - soaking, sprouting or fermenting. Fermenting is by far the most simple and the most beneficial. All it requires is whey. These directions are for almond flour but you can use the same concept to any nut, seed, or grain. For specific instructions on how to do this with whole seeds, see my recipe on trail mix.

The other benefit of using fermented almond flour is that it makes a much lighter end product. The fermentation process acts somewhat like a baking soda or powder, increasing the air space as your treat bakes, making it less dense.

Preparing fermented almond flour is quite easy. After letting it ferment for 24 hours, this base can be kept in the fridge for about a week. If you have a family that loves sweet treats, this is a food that you can keep on hand at all times to create a quick twenty minute cookie. Fermented almond flour is a great base for many baked goods.

Ingredients for Fermented Almond Flour:

  • 2 Cups Almond Flour

  • 1/4 Cup Whey

Directions for Fermented Almond Flour

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Add almond flour to a glass bowl.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Pour whey over almond flour.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Stir to moisten. Add additional whey if needed. Flour should be moist and crumbly but not wet.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Cover and leave for 24 hours to properly ferment. During this time, your fermenting almond flour can be left with other jar ferments because it is covered.

Making Whey

Easy Do-It-Yourself Whey from Yogurt

Whey is the other protein in milk aside from casein. It’s only present after milk products have been cultured and it’s a live food. This liquid is teeming with good lactic acid producing bacteria (LABs.) Whey is a basic to keep on hand because it can be used to ferment flours, seeds, nuts, vegetables, or as a starter to culture other dairy.

I use homemade yogurt to make my whey but you can use store bought yogurt to make your own whey. Make sure you get a full fat, grass fed yogurt that only contains milk and cultures. It’s ok if it’s pasteurized as the culturing process adds life back to this food! Greek yogurt will not work to make whey as there is very little whey naturally in that strain of yogurt. If you are sensitive to lactose or casein, you should leave your store bought yogurt out on the counter, unopened, for an additional 12 - 24 hours to finish culturing the yogurt before you strain the whey. (Essentially making it lactose free.)

If you strain your yogurt for a long time, it becomes almost like a cream cheese substance. It’s great to add fresh herbs to and make a dip!

To speed along the straining time, stir your yogurt well before adding it to the cloth.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

I really like using the villi life culture from the Heirloom Yogurt Starter pack at Cultures for Health. Not only is it a mesophilic culture, meaning it cultures at room temperature instead of at 110 degrees like most yogurts, but it is a runnier yogurt and produces a lot of whey for my baking and fermenting needs.

I enjoy to the runniness of the ville life culture. If you don’t, simply separate some of the whey out of each batch for a thicker end product.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

The cloth I used is the single fold diaper cloth, you can purchase it at Walmart or find something similar at Cultures for Health.

It’s best to use a plastic funnel because metal can be damaging to the good bacteria inside the whey.

Whey keeps in the fridge for about six months if you’ve successfully removed most of the milk solids and strained well.

Ingredients for DIY Whey

  • 3 Cups Homemade Yogurt

Directions for DIY Whey

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Set a plastic strainer inside a large measuring cup or bowl.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Fold the cloth four times and set inside the strainer.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Pour your yogurt into the cloth.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Gather the edges of your cloth and secure with a rubber band.

Leave to sit and strain for as long as desired.

If you want to simply thicken your yogurt, leaving it for only ten minutes is fine. If you’d like to strain all the whey out to make a cream cheese, you can leave it for much longer. I often leave mine out overnight.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Once you have strained enough whey out, pour it into a clean glass jar.

Rinse your cloth well in hot water. Don’t use soap! Hang to dry.

Use your whey to ferment flours, seeds, nuts, or vegetables, or as a starter to culture other dairy. What will you use your whey for?

Steamed Broccoli Recipe

GAPS Legal Broccoli Recipe

My main reason for eating broccoli is to use it as a vehicle for butter.

Need I say more?

Broccoli itself does have some amazing nutritional content on its own, separate from carrying butter. It's high in both soluble and insoluble fiber, potassium, and the vitamins B6, C and A.

What exactly is broccoli? Broccoli is a cruciferous vegetable like cabbage, kale, turnips, cauliflower, and brussel sprouts. It is a wonderful vegetable to eat regularly. Some people avoid broccoli because they experience gas. But if broccoli makes you gassy, your gut flora is unbalanced! You can (and should) address your gut flora, then you can enjoy broccoli again without fear!

I don’t use the stems of the broccoli, which are very fibrous, in this recipe. If you want, you can use them in a soup or fry them up with butter and garlic (which is delicious.) But if you’re early in your healing on the GAPS Intro diet, toss or compost the stems. They are too fibrous for you to eat!

This is a great and simple side dish to serve with any main dish. But whatever you serve it with, the key here is to remember to enjoy your butter!

Ingredients for Steamed Broccoli:

  • 2- 3 Small Broccoli Crowns

  • Water

  • Butter for serving.

Directions for Steamed Broccoli:

I eat broccoli purely as a vehicle for butter. Serve this quick steamed broccoli recipe alongside any meat of your choice for a great GAPS Legal meal. Steamed Broccoli Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Insert steamer into a medium size pot. Add a few inches of filtered water to a pot.

I eat broccoli purely as a vehicle for butter. Serve this quick steamed broccoli recipe alongside any meat of your choice for a great GAPS Legal meal. Steamed Broccoli Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Rinse broccoli well with filtered water.

I eat broccoli purely as a vehicle for butter. Serve this quick steamed broccoli recipe alongside any meat of your choice for a great GAPS Legal meal. Steamed Broccoli Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Cut off stems. Discard if you are on the GAPS Intro diet. Otherwise, set aside for another recipe.

Break broccoli florets apart at the base.

I eat broccoli purely as a vehicle for butter. Serve this quick steamed broccoli recipe alongside any meat of your choice for a great GAPS Legal meal. Steamed Broccoli Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Add florets to the steamer and cover with a lid.

Steam for 15-20 minutes until fork tender, meaning a fork easily slides in and out. If you’re on GAPS Intro, be extra sure it’s fully cooked.

Make sure you don’t run out of water on the bottom of the pan or you will scorch the bottom. To check for water, you can tip the pan without opening it and feel if there is still water shifting. If you are unsure, check! You don't want to run out of water or you could ruin your pan.

I eat broccoli purely as a vehicle for butter. Serve this quick steamed broccoli recipe alongside any meat of your choice for a great GAPS Legal meal. Steamed Broccoli Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Serve as a side alongside meat of your choice. I prefer steak; it just seems to be better that way! Top with plenty of butter! You want to eat about a teaspoon of butter with each piece. I cut a slice to eat with each piece. Enjoy!

Cast Iron Roasted Brussels Sprouts

I know most people don’t care for brussels sprouts. I’ve never shared their view. I think it’s probably because my grandma drowned brussels sprouts in butter when she cooked them. Back in the day, we used to talk about how unhealthy this was but now I know better. Not only does fat provide a delicious taste, it actually makes it easier for your body to use the nutrition in your food.

Even if you have never liked brussels sprouts before, please give them one more try with this recipe. I don’t even like brussels sprouts all ways! For example, I’ve never liked them in soup. If eating brussels sprouts makes you very gassy, it means your gut flora is imbalanced.

Having enough salt on the brussels sprouts helps to break up the cell walls which allows them to cook faster and better. Salt allows them to cook more evenly which makes them more delicious. Make sure you add salt after you plate them as well! If they’re not delicious, you haven’t added enough salt to them.

I also cook the brussels sprouts on a low to medium heat to start with. The goal is to cook the brussels sprouts thoroughly before crisping them. If your heat is too high, you’ll brown them before they are cooked all the way which will result in a questionably edible food. The brown bits are my favorite part so I make sure there are a LOT of them! If you’re on the GAPS Intro Diet, you’ll want to brown sparingly as the browned bits are harder to digest.

Ingredients for Cast Iron Roasted Brussels Sprouts

  • 16 oz brussel sprouts

  • 5 tbsp of Butter or another fat.

Directions for Cast Iron Roasted Brussels Sprouts

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Wash and rinse brussels sprouts.

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Heat a cast iron pan over medium heat. Add in butter to melt.

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Trim brussels sprouts by cutting off the ends and cutting them in half. You want them to be similarly sized pieces so they cook evenly.

If you have an extremely large brussels sprout, consider cutting it in fourths to keep all pieces approximately the same size.

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Add brussels sprouts to the pan. I add in a handful at a time as I’m cutting but you could add all of them at once.

You might need to add your brussels sprouts in batches to the pan depending on how many brussels sprouts you have and the size of your pan. You want them to be in one layer on the bottom of the pan. It’s important not to crowd the pan to allow for even cooking.

Stir to coat with butter or other fat. Add about five shakes of salt.

Slowly cook on a low-medium heat for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

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Once your brussels sprouts are soft but not mushy, turn the heat up higher to brown them. Cook for another 3-5 minutes. Stir frequently on the higher heat to ensure even browning. If your brussels sprouts are larger, they may take longer to cook.

Once your brussels sprouts have browned, transfer to a plate. Add salt to taste. Serve immediately for best taste!

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Cast Iron Roasted Brussels Sprouts

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  • 16 oz Brussels Sprouts

  • 5 TBSP Butter (or fat of your choice)

  1. Wash and rinse brussels sprouts.

  2. Heat a cast iron pan over medium heat. Add in butter to melt.

  3. Trim brussels sprouts by cutting off the ends and cutting them in half. You want them to be similarly sized pieces so they cook evenly. If you have an extremely large brussels sprout, consider cutting it in fourths to keep all pieces approximately the same size.

  4. Add brussels sprouts to the pan. I add in a handful at a time as I’m cutting but you could add all of them at once. You might need to add your brussels sprouts in batches to the pan depending on how many brussels sprouts you have and the size of your pan. You want them to be in one layer on the bottom of the pan. It’s important not to crowd the pan to allow for even cooking.

  5. Stir to coat with butter or other fat. Add about five shakes of salt.

  6. Slowly cook on a low-medium heat for 8 to 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.

  7. Once your brussels sprouts are soft but not mushy, turn the heat up higher to brown them. Cook for another 3-5 minutes. Stir frequently on the higher heat to ensure even browning. If your brussels sprouts are larger, they may take longer to cook.

  8. Once your brussels sprouts have browned, transfer to a plate. Add salt to taste. Serve immediately for best taste!

Chicken Stock Recipe

Meat stock is a pillar in healing a leaky gut but this rich food is beneficial to anyone. It provides large amounts of the immune system’s favorite foods, is very easy to digest, and is a great base to modify for other healing and nutritious recipes.  

Meat stock is meant to be a meal in itself. It’s short cooking time allows the meat to remain edible while still enriching stock with easy to absorb nutrients. This is the perfect thing to eat anytime you are feeling ill or stressed or “can’t get filled up” hungry. These are some of the reasons meat stock is such an important part of the healing process of the GAPS Diet. Any time you are consuming meat stock on a regular basis, your body will be receiving the healing benefit.

Meat stock can be made into a soup or simply drunk on its own as a hot beverage with a meal. You can also poach a couple eggs in your stock for a rich breakfast. Stock can also be used to cook rice or other soaked grains to increase their digestibility and nutritional content. In short, this should be considered a staple to have in your kitchen at all times, either in the fridge or the freezer.

This recipe is stock without aromatics. I prefer stock this way currently because it’s a neutral base ingredient that can be changed in any way for any other recipe. Making stock this way, you can also feed your dog the extra chicken meat because the base doesn’t have onions. Make sure you debone the chicken before giving to your dog; they should not have chicken bones.

You’ll notice I set aside the breasts of the chicken. Good stock should be 80% meat and 20% bone with a joint. Using a whole chicken, this ratio is fulfilled without needed the breasts. You can use the breasts in other recipes or add to the soup later for more tender meat.

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There are a variety of ways you can skim the scum off the top of your stock. I usually use a slotted spoon but you can also use a mesh scum skimmer, a slotted spoon, a small strainer, or a large soup spoon.

Skimming the scum off the top is where you can tell the quality of your meat. If your meat is poor quality, had a lot of hormones or was poorly processed, you’ll get scum that’s heavy, grey and unappetizing. If you have a good quality chicken, you will have a small amount of light almost white colored scum that appears as a lighter foam. This is also where you can tell if your meat has gone bad at this point. If your chicken is not good, you will smell an obvious sulfur smell.

You can store your stock in the fridge or the freezer, depending on how quickly you’ll consume the batch.

A note about Meat Stock and the GAPS Intro Diet:

When Dr. Natasha Campbell talks about meat in stage 1, she’s referring to eating primarily the gelatinous meats like skin, joints and connective tissue. When meat is added on Stage 2, she means the muscle eats, the only thing we Americans consider to be meat. Eating a lot of muscle meat can be constipating so if this is your issue, be sure to eat every last bit of the skin and joints.

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Fill large stock pot with water.

Remove chicken from package and remove giblets from interior. Rinse chicken.

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Cut chicken into 8 pieces, joints exposed. First, remove the wings at the base of the joint.

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Slice the drumsticks, pop the joint out of the meat and finish slicing off the drumstick.

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Slice down the center of the bird, exposing the back. Slice the back off.

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With the chest cavity down, slice to the right of the breast bone, removing one breast and then the other.

Pull the tenders off the breast (the underside of the breast) and remove the skin from the breast. Set the breasts aside for a different recipe.

Optionally, seperate the drumstick from the thigh.

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This is how your chicken should look once you've cut it into the pieces.

Place pieces of chicken into the water. First, the back, then breastbone, then wings, thighs, then the drumsticks. Add in all giblets and extra skin from breasts.

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Meat should be covered with about two inches of water. Here I am measuring the water level with my finger.

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Bring to a boil. It usually takes 10-15 minutes to bring to a boil.

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Skim the scum off the top using a mesh scum skimmer, a slotted spoon or a large soup spoon. Try to leave as much fat as you can in the pot.

If you miss skimming the scum, your meat stock is fine. The scum is simply impurities. Removing them improves the overall taste of your meat stock but leaving them is not harmful.

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Reduce your heat and leave the pot at a simmer for 1 - 1 ½ hours.

Longer simmering will make the meat tasteless. Longer than 8 hours causes the histamine amounts to be higher which can cause nerve irritation symptoms in people with a leaky gut.

Simmering means movement in the water and very little movement on the surface.

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Remove the whole pieces of chicken onto a platter. I use a strainer to make it easier.

Allow the chicken pieces to cool.

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Debone the chicken chunks.

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When you find the heart - SCORE! Eat it! This is my reward to myself for deboning the chicken.

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Make sure you remove only the bones! Everything else is delicious and healthy for you. This photo shows all that should be left after you have deboned the chicken.

Toss the bones or freeze them for bone broth at a later time. I don’t like bone broth so I toss them.

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Once stock has cooled slightly, pour into jars or use immediately for soup, like this GAPS Legal Chicken Tortilla Soup.

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If you’d like to freeze your stock, wait for it to cool to room temperature. This inhibits bacteria growth.

Then, to cool completely, store in the fridge.

Once your stock has completely cooled, add to a BPA free freezer bag. Lay inside a container to shape your bag. Freeze solid.

Do this one bag at a time!

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After deboning the chicken, sift through the meat picking out all the skin and organ meat.

Add these back to your stock and blend them with an immersion blender or blender.

It will get frothy! Don’t be alarmed!

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Chicken Stock

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  • Filtered Water

  • 1 Whole Chicken

  1. Fill large stock pot with water.

  2. Remove chicken from package and remove giblets from interior. Rinse chicken.

  3. Cut chicken into 8 pieces, joints exposed. First, remove the wings at the base of the joint.

  4. Slice the drumsticks, pop the joint out of the meat and finish slicing off the drumstick.

  5. Slice down the center of the bird, exposing the back. Slice the back off.

  6. With the chest cavity down, slice to the right of the breast bone, removing one breast and then the other. Pull the tenders off the breast (the underside of the breast) and remove the skin from the breast. Set the breasts aside for a different recipe.

  7. Optionally, separate the drumstick from the thigh.

  8. Place pieces of chicken into the water. First, the back, then breastbone, then wings, thighs, then the drumsticks. Add in all giblets and extra skin from breasts.

  9. Meat should be covered with about two inches of water.

  10. Bring to a boil. It usually takes 10-15 minutes to bring to a boil.

  11. Skim the scum off the top using a mesh scum skimmer, a slotted spoon or a large soup spoon. Try to leave as much fat as you can in the pot. If you miss skimming the scum, your meat stock is fine. The scum is simply impurities. Removing them improves the overall taste of your meat stock but leaving them is not harmful.

  12. Reduce your heat and leave the pot at a simmer for 1 - 1 ½ hours. Longer simmering will make the meat tasteless. Longer than 8 hours causes the histamine amounts to be higher which can cause nerve irritation symptoms in people with a leaky gut. Simmering means movement in the water and very little movement on the surface.

  13. Remove the whole pieces of chicken onto a platter. I use a strainer to make it easier. Allow the chicken pieces to cool.

  14. Debone the chicken chunks. When you find the heart - SCORE! Eat it! This is my reward to myself for deboning the chicken. Make sure you remove only the bones! Everything else is delicious and healthy for you. Toss the bones or freeze them for bone broth at a later time. I don’t like bone broth so I toss them.

  15. Once stock has cooled slightly, pour into jars or use immediately for soup.

  16. If you’d like to freeze your stock, wait for it to cool to room temperature. This inhibits bacteria growth. Then, to cool completely, store in the fridge. Once your stock has completely cooled, add to a BPA free freezer bag. Lay inside a container to shape your bag. Freeze solid. Do this one bag at a time!

  17. After deboning the chicken, sift through the meat picking out all the skin and organ meat. Add these back to your stock and blend them with an immersion blender or blender. It will get frothy! Don’t be alarmed!

Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe

GAPS Legal Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe

This Chicken Tortilla Soup recipe is a result of me expanding my horizons in genres of food that I cook and eat! This recipe is the first success in hopefully a line of new soups that branch out beyond what I normally make.

I made this recipe for a GAPS Group meeting. The group members thought it was really yummy, and it's a good GAPS soup because of all of the sour cream. It wasn't too spicy, and it's different than plain meat stock that you typically eat on Stage 1. There were tons of suggestions about different ways to make it, so it's also easy to switch up to match your tastes.

I don’t normally make a pepper rich soup but this chicken tortilla soup will keep you warm when it’s cold out, making it a great soup for winter. I don’t normally like spicy food and until fairly recently I have not been able to tolerate much spice. A trip to Nepal a couple years ago taught me that, no matter what it felt like, my mouth was not, in fact, melting off my face. Since that discovery, I have been able to expand my tolerance of spicier foods and enjoying the flavor palette that comes along with them. I have found that I tolerate Asian spices better but do enjoy the Central and South American spice palettes as well.

It’s best for our bodies to eat some kind of ferments alongside every meal. This helps with digestion, aids in removing toxins and keeps our gut flora balanced. My recommended ferments to pair with this chicken tortilla soup would be the Latin American sauerkraut Cortido, fermented peppers, or plain sauerkraut.

Ingredients for Chicken Tortilla Soup:

  • 15 cups chicken stock

  • 4-6 tbsp Lard

  • 1 Medium Onion

  • 6-8 Garlic Cloves

  • 1 Red Bell Pepper

  • 1 Green Bell Pepper

  • Variety of Hot Peppers: I used a third of a Poblano, 2 Jalapenos,1 Serrano Pepper

  • 1 lb boneless skinless chicken breasts

  • Optional: additional 2 cups deboned chicken

  • 1 tsp Salt

  • 4-6 Sprigs Fresh Oregano

  • Fresh Cilantro

  • Sour Cream

  • Avocado

  • Lime

Directions for Chicken Tortilla Soup:

In a large cast iron pan over medium heat, soften lard. Boil chicken stock in a large stock pot.

This chicken tortilla soup recipe is GAPS Legal, GAPS Friendly, Paleo, Whole 30, Keto and a Real Food recipe. You can make it with many variations to make it dairy free as well. It's a little spicy because of the peppers but has the right amount of heat to make it a great soup for a cold winter's day. Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Thinly slice onions. De-seed and pith the peppers. Cut peppers into cubes.

Add onions to pan once lard is melted and pan is hot. Stir to coat in lard.

This chicken tortilla soup recipe is GAPS Legal, GAPS Friendly, Paleo, Whole 30, Keto and a Real Food recipe. You can make it with many variations to make it dairy free as well. It's a little spicy because of the peppers but has the right amount of heat to make it a great soup for a cold winter's day. Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Add green and red bell peppers to cast iron 2 - 3 minutes later.

This chicken tortilla soup recipe is GAPS Legal, GAPS Friendly, Paleo, Whole 30, Keto and a Real Food recipe. You can make it with many variations to make it dairy free as well. It's a little spicy because of the peppers but has the right amount of heat to make it a great soup for a cold winter's day. Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

De-seed your various hot peppers. The amount and types you use depends on how spicy you want the end dish to be. I am pretty mild in terms of heat tolerance so the peppers I used are a mild to moderate heat. Slice them thinly and then cube into smaller chunks.

Add your peppers to the cast iron skillet and stir to combine. Add oregano to pan with peppers.

Dice garlic and add to cast iron pan.

This chicken tortilla soup recipe is GAPS Legal, GAPS Friendly, Paleo, Whole 30, Keto and a Real Food recipe. You can make it with many variations to make it dairy free as well. It's a little spicy because of the peppers but has the right amount of heat to make it a great soup for a cold winter's day. Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Cut chicken breasts into small strips. Add to cast iron pan.

Add salt to chicken and pepper mixture. Stir to combine. Cook until pink is nearly gone from meat. Meat does not need to be fully cooked.

This chicken tortilla soup recipe is GAPS Legal, GAPS Friendly, Paleo, Whole 30, Keto and a Real Food recipe. You can make it with many variations to make it dairy free as well. It's a little spicy because of the peppers but has the right amount of heat to make it a great soup for a cold winter's day. Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Add mixture to boiling meat stock. Add in any additional deboned chicken you have on hand.

Rinse cilantro. It is usually very sandy. Roughly chop cilantro,saving some to garnish the top of your bowls. You’ll want about a handful. Add to stock pot.

This chicken tortilla soup recipe is GAPS Legal, GAPS Friendly, Paleo, Whole 30, Keto and a Real Food recipe. You can make it with many variations to make it dairy free as well. It's a little spicy because of the peppers but has the right amount of heat to make it a great soup for a cold winter's day. Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Simmer for 15 - 30 minutes to blend the flavors.

This soup needs salt! You can add it during simmering or (my preferred method) allow each person to add salt to their bowl.

This chicken tortilla soup recipe is GAPS Legal, GAPS Friendly, Paleo, Whole 30, Keto and a Real Food recipe. You can make it with many variations to make it dairy free as well. It's a little spicy because of the peppers but has the right amount of heat to make it a great soup for a cold winter's day. Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe by Northern Colorado Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Serve your chicken tortilla soup with plenty of sour cream and lime juice. Top with avocado slices and fresh cilantro. Enjoy!

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Chicken Tortilla Soup Recipe

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  • 15 Cups Chicken Stock

  • 4-6 tbsp Lard

  • 1 Onion (Medium)

  • 6-8 Garlic Cloves

  • 1 Red Bell Pepper

  • 1 Green Bell Pepper

  • Variety of Hot Peppers ( I used a third of a Poblano, 2 Jalapenos,1 Serrano Pepper)

  • 1 lb Boneless Skinless Chicken Breasts

  • Additional 2 cups Deboned Chicken (Optional)

  • 1 tsp Salt

  • 4-6 Sprigs of Oregano

  • Fresh Cilantro

  • Sour Cream

  • Avocado

  • Lime

    1. a large cast iron pan over medium heat, soften lard. Boil chicken stock in a large stock pot.

    2. Thinly slice onions. Deseed and pith the peppers.Cut peppers into cubes.

    3. Add onions to pan once lard is melted and pan is hot. Stir to coat in lard.

    4. Add green and red bell peppers to cast iron 2 - 3 minutes later.

    5. De-seed your various hot peppers. The amount and types you use depends on how spicy you want the end dish to be. I am pretty mild in terms of heat tolerance so the peppers I used are a mild to moderate heat. Slice them thinly and then cube into smaller chunks.

    6. Add your peppers to the cast iron skillet and stir to combine. Add oregano to pan with peppers.

    7. Dice garlic and add to cast iron pan.

    8. Cut chicken breasts into small strips. Add to cast iron pan,

    9. Add salt to chicken and pepper mixture. Stir to combine. Cook until pink is nearly gone from meat. Meat does not need to be fully cooked

    10. Add mixture to boiling meat stock. Add in any additional deboned chicken you have on hand.

    11. Rinse cilantro. It is usually very sandy. Roughly chop cilantro,saving some to garnish the top of your bowls. You’ll want about a handful. Add to stock pot.

    12. Simmer for 15 - 30 minutes to blend the flavors.

    13. This soup needs salt! You can add it during simmering or (my preferred method) allow each person to add salt to their bowl.

    14. Serve with plenty of sour cream and lime juice. Top with avocado slices and fresh cilantro.