GAPS diet

Homemade Gummy Snacks

Vitamin C and collagen work together to build healthy cells and mucus membranes, as well as healthy joints and skin. Anything with a structure needs vitamin c alongside collagen. These gummies are a good way for both children and adults to get collagen and vitamin c together! These gummies are stage five legal on the GAPS Diet because they are cooked fruit.

I got the basics proportions for this recipe from Integrative Health Coaching Services and modified it to fit my own needs. Depending on what proportions you use, the chart included on the Integrative Health Coaching Services website can help you decide how many gelatin squares to eat. If your children really love these gummies, you can decrease the amount of acerola cherry powder so that they can consume more gummy treats. These can also be great ABA technique rewards to get your child to eat the foods you want them to eat.

I recommend experimenting with adding other things like probiotic powders,and other supplements in these gummies. Just make sure you add anything live when the gummies are not too hot. Wait until the later stages when the mixture is cool enough so you don’t kill it. 

I once made a bold choice and experimented with adding dessicated liver in a quest to figure out what other supplements can be added to the mixture. I don’t think liver was the best choice. There’s nothing wrong with consuming them; they just smell and taste like liver, which isn’t the flavor profile you’d expect. 

I made strawberry gummies but you could also make any berry into a gummy. Other fruit, like apples and bananas, will not work to make gummies at home. Frozen berries are actually a great choice because they are picked ripe and frozen while in season. You could also harvest your own berries locally and freeze them yourself.

Ingredients;

  • 1 heaping cup frozen berries

  • 1/2 Cup lemon juice

  • 1/4 Cup grass fed gelatin

  • 3-4 Tbsp.. Acerola cherry powder 

  • 1 tbsp honey

Directions:

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Add 1 heaping cup of frozen strawberries to a pot. Add enough water to cover the bottom. Turn the stove on to medium heat.

Help the berries break apart by stirring them with a spoon. 

When they start to get really soft, turn the stove to a low heat simmer.

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Blend softened berries and lemon juice in a blender.

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Once smooth, add back into pot. Add in gelatin and acerola cherry powder. Whisk well for about ten minutes until all combined.

Add honey at the end so that you are not cooking the honey.

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Pour into a glass baking dish.

If you are adding a probiotic powder, make sure your mixture is cooled enough to where you can easily leave a finger in it before adding the powder. This will ensure you do not kill the probiotics.

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Set in fridge to chill. Gummies should be chilled in about 40 minutes. Slice around the sides and cut into cubes to remove from glass pan.

Northern Colorado GAPS Group Meeting Recap May 21, 2019

Each week, we gather in Northern Colorado for a meetup centered around the GAPS Diet, started by Dr. Natasha Campbell. During these meetups, we have a lesson about a fundamental aspect of the GAPS Diet, exchange recipes and ideas, support each other through the GAPS Diet, and learn something new from a holistic healthcare speaker or presenter.

The first GAPS Group meeting that you attend is FREE.

If you find the information helpful, individual classes are $15 to attend, or you can buy a punch card for five classes that brings down the cost to $10 per class (recommended). We'll have punch cards for sale when you arrive at Tuesday's meeting.

If you can't make it in-person, we're happy to send you a link for you to watch us LIVE. Send an email to Office@bewellclinic.net to request the link to the broadcast! Costs will still apply to virtual attendance, so we recommend that you come join us to receive all of the benefits of the meeting.

GAPS Group Meeting May 21st, 2019

This week was a recipe presentation on sauerkraut!

This week, the Be Well Clinic’s own Lauren Isenhour did a recipe demonstration on how to make sauerkraut. You can find the directions on how to make your own saurkraut here.

Sauerkraut is a GAPS staple and a delicious ferment to keep in the house. It’s also extremely easy to make! These food demonstrations are a great reason to come to the GAPS Group Meeting because they are supplemental to the blog post recipes. It’s a great way to learn a new way to cook or think about food and it can be helpful to see how to make something first hand. The most important part of this recipe is to note the change in the texture of the cabbage as the salt does it’s job to break down the cell walls of the cabbage. This change is noticeable in a short period of time as you can see by the photos below!

Amy also presented on supplements and how to correctly supplement your food as your body needs it. Amy shared on the benefits of supplements like fermented cod liver oil, iodine, ox bile, and probiotics (which sauerkraut is a great source off!) She also shared about the die-off reaction that happens as we change our health and how to recognize and manage those symptoms.

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JOIN US AT OUR NEXT GAPS GROUP MEETING!

Next week's GAPS Group Meeting is the start of a new Getting Started on GAPS Session! Come meet the members of Be Well Clinic's GAPS Group and share your stories.

Our lesson is on Intro GAPS. Amy will share how the stages work and how to nourish the body and heal the gut. We'll talk about how and why all diseases begin in the gut and how you can change your health by healing your gut.

If you feel like you're well-versed on the practical applications of GAPS, you're welcome to skip this part of the meeting and join us at 7:00 PM for our recipe sharing and discussion. This week's we're talking about vegetable ferments!

The Recipe Sharing and Discussion is one of the best things about GAPS Group! You get to try delicious food, and take home the recipe so you can recreate it! It's a great way to diversify your GAPS go-tos, and you get to catch up with everyone on their progress. Sometimes, hearing someone else's success story is the best way to get you to keep going.

Location:
GAPS Group is currently held at the Loveland Outlets, very close to our new office space. It’s located north of McWhinney Blvd. next to The Studio, near Tommy Hilfiger and Sketchers. The best way to get there is to set your GPS to 5613 McWhinney Blvd, Loveland, CO 80538 and walk to suite 5609. Get more details on the exact location here.

See more information and RSVP to the event on our Facebook page.

Northern Colorado GAPS Group Meeting Recap April 30th, 2019

Each week, we gather in Northern Colorado for a meetup centered around the GAPS Diet, started by Dr. Natasha Campbell. During these meetups, we have a lesson about a fundamental aspect of the GAPS Diet, exchange recipes and ideas, support each other through the GAPS Diet, and learn something new from a holistic healthcare speaker or presenter.

The first GAPS Group meeting that you attend is FREE.

If you find the information helpful, individual classes are $15 to attend, or you can buy a punch card for five classes that brings down the cost to $10 per class (recommended). We'll have punch cards for sale when you arrive at Tuesday's meeting.

If you can't make it in-person, we're happy to send you a link for you to watch us LIVE. Send an email to Office@bewellclinic.net to request the link to the broadcast! Costs will still apply to virtual attendance, so we recommend that you come join us to receive all of the benefits of the meeting.

GAPS Group Meeting April 30th, 2019

This week’s presenter was Dr. Carl Malone of The Natural Path.

Dr. Tiffany Wall talked to us about the communication pathways within our bodies, and how stress alone can knock our bodies so far off balance that we get and stay sick.
Then Amy talked about the GAPS protocol and its aims. First and foremost, we want to normalize the fur flora. We also want to heal and seal the gut lining, restore gut function, and restore immunity. The protocol has three parts to it:1: GAPS Diet2: Supplementation3: Detoxing 
She talked in detail about all of them, but the most interesting one was the die-off reaction that results from repopulating our bodies with good bacteria. 

At one point, she said “sometimes your body has to remind you that what you just ate is not food. I know you tried to eat it as food, but it’s not food”

After our Getting Started on GAPS lesson ended, we all stayed to shared GAPS Legal Recipes and hang out. We swapped stories about things we have and haven't tried, talked about our favorite oils, and enjoyed the food! Finding others on the GAPS journey at the same time is a key to your success!

At our meeting, we learned about two soups, a cauliflower rice casserole, and lots and lots of animal fats. You know it's a GAPS meeting because everyone remembers to bring the butter and sour cream!

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Join us at our next GAPS Group Meeting!

Next week's GAPS Group Meeting is the start of a new Getting Started on GAPS Session! Come meet the members of Be Well Clinic's GAPS Group and share your stories.

Our lesson is on Intro GAPS. Amy will share how the stages work and how to nourish the body and heal the gut. We'll talk about how and why all diseases begin in the gut and how you can change your health by healing your gut.

If you feel like you're well-versed on the practical applications of GAPS, you're welcome to skip this part of the meeting and join us at 7:00 PM for our recipe sharing and discussion. This week's we're talking about vegetable ferments!

The Recipe Sharing and Discussion is one of the best things about GAPS Group! You get to try delicious food, and take home the recipe so you can recreate it! It's a great way to diversify your GAPS go-tos, and you get to catch up with everyone on their progress. Sometimes, hearing someone else's success story is the best way to get you to keep going.

Location:
GAPS Group is currently held at the Loveland Outlets, very close to our new office space. It’s located north of McWhinney Blvd. next to The Studio, near Tommy Hilfiger and Sketchers. The best way to get there is to set your GPS to 5613 McWhinney Blvd, Loveland, CO 80538 and walk to suite 5609. Get more details on the exact location here.

See more information and RSVP to the event on our Facebook page.

How to Properly Caramelize Onions

Caramelized onions are an amazing supporting food because they are high in vitamin C, calcium, and quercetin. It’s especially helpful for sore throats but is an excellent food to eat anytime you are starting to feel under the weather! (Check out more of my helpful tips for caring for yourself when you’re sick here.)

I recommend a whole onion per person because the onions will reduce in size. You want to use a lot of animal fat with this recipe! I like both butter or lard, so whatever you happen to have on hand is ok. The fat is also great for you while you’re sick. Make sure you add enough salt for the added minerals, which is also very important when you’re ill.

White or yellow onions work for this recipe. I prefer the yellow onions and often have them on hand so that is what I usually use.

For great caramelized onions, make sure your heat is on low. This is a food that is best with patience - and burnt with impatience. Allow 20 - 30 minutes of cooking time to get really good caramelized onions. You can cook multiple onions at a time as long as you are using a large enough pan. If your entire family is sick, you can make a batch for everyone in about the same amount of time as cooking just one.

When slicing your onions, you want to slice them in short slices. Don’t give into the temptation of dicing your onions! Even if it seems they will cook faster, you’ll most likely end up with a burnt or mushy dish.

Make sure you don’t crowd your pan of onions or they won’t properly caramelize. Above is the maximum amount of onions I would put in one pan.

Caramelized onions should be sweet! They shouldn’t really taste like onions at all when they’re finished! As they cook, take a taster. If it still tastes like onions, keep stirring.

Dr Natasha recommends topping a caramelized onion with a little olive oil and a couple fried eggs. (Again fried in plenty of fat.) This is a very filling meal that’s amazing when you’re sick.

However, you don’t need to be sick to enjoy this nourishing food! It can be very soothing when you’ve had a long day and are needing a comfort food.

Ingredients for Caramelized Onions:

  • 2-3 Tbsp Fat of Your Choice Per Onion

  • Onion (1 Per Person)

  • Salt (The amount of salt will vary if you’re using salted butter or unsalted lard.)

Directions for Caramelized Onions:

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Slice the ends of your onion and peel. Put the peels and “extras” into a bag for use in stock later.

Cut the onion in half. Then cut into half again.

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Slice the onion so long strips form.

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Start your pan heating on medium high and add the fat of your choice. Heating your pan before your onion is sliced will result in a pan that is too hot.

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Add your onions to the pan. Stir to coat in the fat.

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Cook onions over medium heat, stirring every few minutes.

When they are nearing translucency (about 25 ish minutes) add a little salt if you are not using salted butter. Even if you are using salted butter, adding a little extra salt will help them break down.

Make sure everyone salts their onions to taste once the onions are on their plates!

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Your onions are done when they are golden brown. Enjoy them on their own or as part of a larger meal.


Caramelized Onions

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2-3 Tbsp Fat of Your Choice Per Onion
  • Onion (1 Per Person)
  • Salt (The amount of salt will vary if you’re using salted butter or unsalted lard.)

instructions:

How to cook Caramelized Onions

  1. Slice the ends of your onion and peel. Put the peels and “extras” into a bag for use in stock later.
  2. Cut the onion in half. Then cut into half again.
  3. Slice the onion so long strips form.
  4. Start your pan heating on medium high and add the fat of your choice. Heating your pan before your onion is sliced will result in a pan that is too hot.
  5. Add your onions to the pan. Stir to coat in the fat.
  6. Cook onions over medium heat, stirring every few minutes.
  7. When they are nearing translucency (about 25 ish minutes) add a little salt if you are not using salted butter. Even if you are using salted butter, adding a little extra salt will help them break down.
  8. Make sure everyone salts their onions to taste once the onions are on their plates!
  9. Your onions are done when they are golden brown. Enjoy them on their own or as part of a larger meal.
Created using The Recipes Generator

How to Make Cabbage Tonic

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. This cabbage tonic can be taken from the beginning of the Intro Diet of GAPS. Use this tonic daily to help change your gut flora. As with all probiotic foods, make sure you begin with only a small amount, about a tablespoon at a time, keeping an eye out for symptoms of die off. If none are present, you can continue gradually increasing your daily amount and the frequency that you consume this tonic throughout the day.

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. This cabbage tonic can be taken from the beginning of the Intro Diet of GAPS. Use this tonic daily to help change your gut flora. As with all probiotic foods, make sure you begin with only a small amount, about a tablespoon at a time, keeping an eye out for symptoms of die off. If none are present, you can continue gradually increasing your daily amount and the frequency that you consume this tonic throughout the day.

When you do ferments, your intention and energy really does affect the taste of the ferments. If you’re stressed, it will show in the food. Do ferments at a time that you’re relaxed and enjoying being in the kitchen. If this is not your mindset, take a couple minutes to reset, thinking about how this work is bringing such amazing health and healing to your body and your family. After your mindset is set, smile and preparing your ferment!

When doing ferments, it is important to hand wash your jars. A lot of dishwashers leave a film of soap, even if you’re using a natural soap. Make sure you rinse your jar well with hot water. It’s not necessary to sterilize your jar; we’re not canning. Fermentation creates a live food that will take care of the bad bacteria.

Tidbit from Nourishing Traditions: “Add ¼ - ½ tsp cayenne pepper to 4 ounces of cabbage tonic for a gargle and sore throat remedy.

This recipe is based on the Nourishing Traditions cookbook by Sally Fallon on page 614.

Ingredients for Cabbage Tonic:

  • ¼ Organic Green Cabbage

  • 1 tsp Sea Salt

  • ¼ Cup Whey

  • Filtered Water

Directions for Cabbage Tonic:

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Shred cabbage finely with a knife. You want small even pieces so it ferments evenly. (Similar to cutting onions for even cooking.)

Add cabbage and salt to a bowl.

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Using your hands, squish the cabbage for about a minute.

Let the cabbage sit for five minutes.

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Squish the cabbage again for a minute.

Put cabbage in a 2 quart jar with whey.

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Add enough water to fill the container.

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Cover tightly.

Leave at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to the fridge.


Cabbage Tonic

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ¼ Organic Green Cabbage
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • ¼ Cup Whey
  • Filtered Water

instructions:

How to cook Cabbage Tonic

  1. Shred cabbage finely with a knife. You want small even pieces so it ferments evenly. (Similar to cutting onions for even cooking.)
  2. Add cabbage and salt to a bowl.
  3. Using your hands, squish the cabbage for about a minute.
  4. Let the cabbage sit for five minutes.
  5. Squish the cabbage again for a minute.
  6. Put cabbage in a 2 quart jar with whey.
  7. Add enough water to fill the container.
  8. Cover tightly.
  9. Leave at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to the fridge.
Created using The Recipes Generator

All About Fruits and Vegetables

Sweet fruits! Is there anything better than a juicy peach on a summer’s day or a bright red strawberry, straight from the garden and bursting with tart flavor? And vegetables! Their cooling crunch, the endless ways to season them up and add them to everything.

Plants like fruits and vegetables cleanse our bodies. They help our bodies to process and remove the toxins that we are exposed to on a daily basis from the environment around us, even if we do our best to avoid toxins. We mostly benefit from the fiber, antioxidants, enzymes, and other detoxifying substances.

Drinking fresh juices made up of both fruits and vegetables is one of the easiest ways to enjoy the rich nutritional benefits of produce. Adding fruit into juices will especially help children in getting all the benefits that juicing can offer.

Fruits, nuts, and other treats should be limited, even on Full GAPS. So treat yourself to an occasional piece of fruit but don’t overdo it! To see a full list of fruits and vegetables that are acceptable on the GAPS Diet, click here.

Good Fruits and Vegetables: The Clean 15 and the Dirty Dozen

If you’re on a strict food budget or looking for a small change that can have a large impact, try purchasing “The Clean 15.” A non-profit group called the Environmental Working Group conducts ongoing research about pesticides that are in (and on) our food and creates a guide to produce pesticides, which they update every year. They rank 48 popular fruits and vegetables, with the “Clean 15” being the top fifteen fruits and vegetables with the least amount of pesticides.

For fruits in 2019, the “Clean 15” which you can purchase the non-organic versions are:

  • Avocados

  • Pineapples

  • Papayas

  • Kiwi

  • Cantaloupe

  • Honeydew Melons

For vegetables in 2019, the "Clean 15" which you can purchase the non-organic versions are:

  • Sweet Corn

  • Sweet Peas

  • Onions

  • Eggplants

  • Asparagus

  • Cabbage

  • Cauliflower

  • Broccoli

  • Mushrooms

A note on Genetically Engineered seeds: The Environmental Working Group has said that a small amount of papaya, sweet corn, and summer squash sold in the U.S. is produced from Genetically Engineered seeds. To avoid Genetically Engineered produce, buy papayas organic.

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Conversely, the “Dirty Dozen” are fruits that you really want to purchase organically. These are the top twelve fruits and vegetables that contain pesticides so to keep yourself toxin free, it’s important to purchase organic.

For fruits in 2019, the “Dirty Dozen” that should be purchased organically are:

  • Strawberries

  • Nectarines

  • Apples

  • Grapes

  • Peaches

  • Cherries

  • Pears

For vegetables in 2019, the "Dirty Dozen" that should be purchased organically are:

  • Spinach

  • Kale

  • Tomatoes

  • Celery

  • Potatoes

  • Hot Peppers

Better Fruits and Vegetables: Purchasing High Quality Organic Always

Organic means produce is grown without synthetic pesticides, synthetic fertilizers or genetically modified organisms.  Purchasing all of your fruits and vegetables organically is beneficial for you and beneficial for the plant! If you’re looking for the better choice in produce, try purchasing high quality organic fruits and vegetables.

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Best Fruits and Vegetables: Eating Local and in Season

The best choice when it comes to choosing fruits and vegetables is to eat local and in season fruit. Eating in season means your food is fresher and better tasting! Eating local is also better for the environment because your food travels less miles to be on your table.

To buy local, in season fruits and vegetables, you can check for local farming co-ops or farmer’s markets. Buying local also means you’re supporting a small business. It’s a win-win-win all around! Or consider growing your own fruits and vegetables if you have the space!

To find in-season fruits and vegetables no matter where you are, try the Seasonal Food Guide website.

The Best Way to Add Fermented Food to Your Diet

Fermenting - one of the best things I discovered on my journey of healing!

The process of preserving food by fermenting it is something that’s been around for centuries and is practiced all other world. It’s not just the process of creating alcoholic beverages like beer or wine, or creating different types of dairy like cheese or yogurt.  Eating fermented foods is a huge part of the GAPS Diet, but anyone who adds fermented foods to their diet will see some benefit.

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There’s so many benefits to fermenting!  Fermenting food means you’re helping beneficial bacteria and yeast grow that aid in digestion. Fermented foods are packed full of probiotics, which helps your gut health. It also boosts immunity by producing lactic acid, which pathogenic bacteria cannot live in the presence of. It allows you to preserve food longer which means that you’re throwing less away! It also increases the nutritional availability without adding anything extra.

While any type of ferment that you consume is beneficial, there are good, better, and best ways to ferment.

Good: Buying a Ferment at the Store

There are a variety of common ferments that are available at most grocery stores. Starting small and adding just one ferment to your diet will bring some benefit to your gut health and overall wellbeing.

While purchasing a ferment from a store isn’t the most beneficial for your wallet or your health, if you want to dip your toes into fermented foods, purchasing one can be just fine. Find one that has the least amount of ingredients possible and has the least amount of processing. Fermented foods should be as close to the source as they can be.

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Better: Buying Multiple Ferments at the Store

There are many kinds of fermented foods so experiment! Adding a variety of ferments to your diet is important because you and your gut will get a much wider variety of bacteria, all naturally. Fermented foods come in many different varieties, like pickled vegetables, sauerkraut, or even liquids like kombucha and kefir.

A better option for getting ferments into your diet is to purchase a variety of high quality ferments from the store.

Best: Making and Consuming Your Own Variety of Ferments

Making your own ferments is absolutely the best! I love making my own ferments because I can buy large quantities of food in season and locally and preserve it for a long time. I also know what I’m eating because I added it myself!

Consuming a variety of different kinds of ferments is important for our gut health. By making your own, you can save a lot of money and get all the variety you need!

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When you make your own ferments, you’re intimately connected with what you’re eating. This is important for thoughtful eating.

If you’re interested in fermenting your own food, I’ve shared a lot about fermenting over the years! You can see more on the process of fermenting here and here, and specifically about lacto-fermenting here. Whey is a great way (get it!) to start the fermentation process for many ferments. You can learn about making your own whey here.

For recipes on fermenting food, check out my beet kvass recipe, my recipe for fermented garlic (learn more about the benefits of fermented garlic) or learn how to ferment almond flour for baking.

10 Ways to Consume Meat Stock

Meat stock is one of the pillars of a healthy gut diet. While bone broth is getting a lot of press lately, I don’t recommend it for most people. (Learn more about why I recommend meat stock over bone broth here.) Meat stock really gets a gold medal as a great nutrient dense food that can boost your immunity, help with healing allergies, and is easy to digest, especially for those with a leaky gut. Even better, meat stock is meant to be a meal all on it’s own! You can make meat stock with any meat, though I think chicken meat stock is the easiest beginner stock.

Consuming meat stock is a habit I encourage my clients to do throughout the day because of it’s great health benefits. There are many ways to consume meat stock and some creative ways so that you don’t get bored with consuming meat stock frequently. Here’s a few of my favorites!

Vary Your Meat Stock Recipe

Try adding different spices and herbs to your meat stock recipe when you cook it. This will change the taste to keep it interesting. You can also vary the vegetables and aromatics that you add - or add no aromatics like onions and your dogs can consume your meat stock as well!

Consuming meat stock is an important part of the GAPS Diet but having it the same over and over can grow tiring. Here are ten unique and creative ways to consume meat stock whether you're on the GAPS Diet or not. Northern Colorado Holistic healthcare provided by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Have It Warm

Heated stock is a great warming beverage, especially on cool winter mornings. Keeping heated stock in a mug next to you will allow you to drink it alongside your morning meal.

If you’re on the go, keep your heated stock in a thermos so it stays warm throughout the day. Then you can sip on it just like a tea or coffee.

Eat It Cold

Drinking cold stock is very refreshing on a hot summer day!

If your stock gets a good gel at the top, you can simply pop the gel off the top of your stock and eat it cold like a meat jelly.

Use Meat Stock as a Base

Meat stock makes an excellent base for different soups and other recipes. I’ve been partial to this chicken tortilla soup recipe recently but you can make it into any variety of soup that sounds delicious.

Add an Egg (or Two)

You can poach eggs in warm stock for a delicious breakfast. Use the stock as a replacement for the water that you would normally poach eggs in.

Or, break and stir a few egg yolks only into warm stock. This will create a cheesy tasting drink that is delicious.

Consume Meat Stock on the Go

Traveling can bring up a whole host of stressors and traveling on the GAPS Diet means paying closer attention to your food. Since meat stock is one of the pillars of the GAPS Diet, it’s important to factor it into your travel plans. There’s a few different ways to consume meat stock on the go, from dehydrating it to making it when you get there.

What are your favorite ways to consume meat stock? If you have other ideas, share them in the comments below!

Liver Pâté Recipe

Liver pâté makes me feel like I am eating a treat when I'm really eating something healthy—very healthy and good for me! You can make pate out of any type of liver, but chicken liver is the most mild, so that is a great one to start with if you are not used to eating liver. Once you make this delicious mixture, you can eat it many ways. Honestly, I mostly just eat it by the spoonful, but there are many other ways you can eat pate, including the ones listed below. After you make this wonderful superfood, let us know in the comments your favorite ways to spice and eat pate.

Ways to Eat liver Pate:

  • It’s good on it’s own

  • Spread it on crackers or bread if you are not following the GAPS diet

  • Create GAPS Legal “crackers” with slices of avocado or zucchini

  • Layer with fermented veggies like cabbage or sauerkraut

  • Spread on pieces of cheese

  • Dip veggies such as carrot sticks,

  • Add the pate to lean meats like chicken or turkey or game meat like venison or turkey to give it a boost of fat

GAPS Legal Liver Pate Ingredients

  • ½ c Liver

  • Butter or lard

  • 2 tbsp chopped Onion

  • 3 cloves of Garlic

  • Spices

    • 1/16 tsp nutmeg, cloves and ginger

    • ¼ tsp of cinnamon

    • ¼ to ½ tsp Salt

  • 2 small pans

  • Blender or Food Processor

Directions for making liver pate for the gaps diet

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Roughly chop about 2 tbsp of an onion. The smaller you chop your onion, the quicker it will cook but careful - too small and it’s easy to burn!

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Add about ½ inch of water to a pan. Add liver to pan to poach.

After 2-3 minutes, flip the liver to poach the other side.

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Add butter or lard to a small skillet.  Add the onions to the skillet, stir. Add the garlic to the skillet.

The liver is done when it is still a little pink inside but not red. A little blood coming out of the liver when it’s done. If the juices are all clear, the liver is overcooked.

Add liver to the food processor or blender. Process quickly on its own.

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Add cooked onions and garlic to food processor or blender. Add enough fat so that the ratio is about 40% fat, 60% liver, about 3 tbsp for ½ cup of liver. Lard has less of a flavor than butter, butter will give your pate a different flavor.

Blend until smooth.

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Add spices and ¼ tsp salt to the blender or food processor. Blend until smooth. If needed, add remaining ½ tsp of salt.

Serve pate warm or chilled.


Liver Pate

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ c Liver
  • Butter or lard
  • 2 tbsp chopped Onion
  • 3 cloves of Garlic
  • Spices
  • 1/16 tsp nutmeg, cloves and ginger
  • ¼ tsp of cinnamon
  • ¼ to ½ tsp Salt
  • 2 small pans
  • Blender or Food Processor

instructions:

How to cook Liver Pate

  1. Roughly chop about 2 tbsp of an onion. The smaller you chop your onion, the quicker it will cook but careful - too small and it’s easy to burn!
  2. Add about ½ inch of water to a pan. Add liver to pan to poach.
  3. After 2-3 minutes, flip the liver to poach the other side.
  4. Add butter or lard to a small skillet. Add the onions to the skillet, stir. Add the garlic to the skillet.
  5. The liver is done when it is still a little pink inside but not red. A little blood coming out of the liver when it’s done. If the juices are all clear, the liver is overcooked.
  6. Add liver to the food processor or blender. Process quickly on its own.
  7. Add cooked onions and garlic to food processor or blender. Add enough fat so that the ratio is about 40% fat, 60% liver, about 3 tbsp for ½ cup of liver. Lard has less of a flavor than butter, butter will give your pate a different flavor.
  8. Blend until smooth.
  9. Add spices and ¼ tsp salt to the blender or food processor. Blend until smooth. If needed, add remaining ½ tsp of salt.
  10. Serve pate warm or chilled.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Butternut Squash GAPS Pancakes Recipe

This recipe was adapted from the GAPS Pancake Recipe in the Gut and Psychology Syndrome book by Dr. Natasha Campbell. Makes 3 Pancakes.

GAPS Legal Pancakes Ingredients

  • 1/2 c. cooked Butternut Squash

  • 3 Farm Fresh Eggs

  • Fat such as lard, butter or sour cream

  • Salt

  • Toppings such as date syrup or cinnamon

  • Food Processor or Blender

Directions for gaps legal pancakes

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Cut butternut squash into halves. Deseed and bake face down on a parchment lined baking tray for 40 minutes at 400 degrees until very soft.

When squash has cooled and can be handled, scoop out the flesh with a spoon into a large bowl.

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Add squash, eggs and fat to blender. For every 1/2 cup of squash, add 3 eggs, 1 tbsp of fat and 2 pinches of salt. The traditional GAPS pancake recipe uses almond butter to thicken instead of fat. Since this is a nut free recipe, I used fat to thicken instead. Blend until smooth.

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Add a couple tablespoons of fat to a pan. Heat on low heat until oil is simmering.

Make sure your fat is glistening in the pan before adding your pancake batter. You can also add one drop of water into the pan. If it sizzles, the oil is ready.When pan is ready, add scoop of pancake batter. Cook pancake on low heat for about 10 minutes.

You can cook multiple pancakes at a time but I’ve had the best luck cooking one at a time!

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Similar to traditional pancakes, they will bubble on top when they are ready to flip.

Cook on the second side for about two to three minutes. Be careful - this second side will cook much faster than the first!

gaps-legal-pancakes-pancakes-made-with-butternut-squash-gaps-diet-gaps-protocol

Once cooked, add butter. Keep as a savory pancake or for a sweeter treat, add date syrup or cinnamon. Do not add cinnamon to the mixture before you cook - it will burn!

Notes: If your fat gets too hot and burns, rinse your pan out and start with new fat for the next pancake. Otherwise, all the pancakes will taste burn.

Blackened and burnt sections of the pancake contain high levels of carbon, which is difficult to digest. These should be avoided as much as possible on the introduction stages of the GAPS diet.


Butternut Squash Pancakes

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:
This recipe was adapted from the GAPS Pancake Recipe in the Gut and Psychology Syndrome book by Dr. Natasha Campbell. Makes 3 Pancakes.

ingredients:

  • 1/2 c. cooked Butternut Squash
  • 3 Farm Fresh Eggs
  • Fat such as lard, butter or sour cream
  • Salt
  • Toppings such as date syrup or cinnamon
  • Food Processor or Blender

instructions:

How to cook Butternut Squash Pancakes

  1. Cut butternut squash into halves. Deseed and bake face down on a parchment lined baking tray for 40 minutes at 400 degrees until very soft.
  2. When squash has cooled and can be handled, scoop out the flesh with a spoon into a large bowl.
  3. Add squash, eggs and fat to blender. For every 1/2 cup of squash, add 3 eggs, 1 tbsp of fat and 2 pinches of salt. The traditional GAPS pancake recipe uses almond butter to thicken instead of fat. Since this is a nut free recipe, I used fat to thicken instead. Blend until smooth.
  4. Add a couple tablespoons of fat to a pan. Heat on low heat until oil is simmering.
  5. Make sure your fat is glistening in the pan before adding your pancake batter. You can also add one drop of water into the pan. If it sizzles, the oil is ready.When pan is ready, add scoop of pancake batter. Cook pancake on low heat for about 10 minutes.
  6. You can cook multiple pancakes at a time but I’ve had the best luck cooking one at a time!
  7. Similar to traditional pancakes, they will bubble on top when they are ready to flip.
  8. Cook on the second side for about two to three minutes. Be careful - this second side will cook much faster than the first!
  9. Once cooked, add butter. Keep as a savory pancake or for a sweeter treat, add date syrup or cinnamon. Do not add cinnamon to the mixture before you cook - it will burn!
  10. Notes: If your fat gets too hot and burns, rinse your pan out and start with new fat for the next pancake. Otherwise, all the pancakes will taste burn.
  11. Blackened and burnt sections of the pancake contain high levels of carbon, which is difficult to digest. These should be avoided as much as possible on the introduction stages of the GAPS diet.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Whole Roasted Chicken with Salt Recipe

GAPS Legal Roasted Chicken with Salt Ingredients

  • Chicken

  • Salt, about 2 tbsp

  • Parchment Paper

  • Aluminum Foil

Directions for roasted chicken with salt

Simple-Roasted-Chicken-Recipe-Roast-Chicken-with-Salt-GAPS-Legal-How-To-Make-Chicken-On-GAPS-Whole-30-Chicken-Recipe

Preheat oven to 400 degrees. I like to start hot so that the skin cooks and then turn the oven down after it’s been cooking for 15 minutes so it holds the juices in.

Pour your salt into a bowl so you don’t contaminate the rest of the salt.

Rinse and pat dry chicken, inside and outside. Remove the giblets and set aside.

Simple-Roasted-Chicken-Recipe-Roast-Chicken-with-Salt-GAPS-Legal-How-To-Make-Chicken-On-GAPS-Whole-30-Chicken-Recipe

Rub salt all over the chicken, taking care to put salt inside the chicken cavity.

Simple-Roasted-Chicken-Recipe-Roast-Chicken-with-Salt-GAPS-Legal-How-To-Make-Chicken-On-GAPS-Whole-30-Chicken-Recipe

Rinse the giblets. Add the giblets to the inside of the cavity.

Simple-Roasted-Chicken-Recipe-Roast-Chicken-with-Salt-GAPS-Legal-How-To-Make-Chicken-On-GAPS-Whole-30-Chicken-Recipe

Cover with unbleached parchment paper and tinfoil. You don’t want aluminum foil to touch your food. You can also use a dutch oven pan and omit the parchment paper/aluminum foil covering.

Put in the oven.

After about 15 minutes, turn the oven down to 350.

Simple-Roasted-Chicken-Recipe-Roast-Chicken-with-Salt-GAPS-Legal-How-To-Make-Chicken-On-GAPS-Whole-30-Chicken-Recipe

After an hour, check the chicken temperature. Continue cooking chicken for an additional 45 minutes.

Remove foil and parchment paper covering for about the last 5-10 minutes of cooking to brown up the skin. Chicken is done when it reaches 165 internal temperature on a meat thermometer.

Simple-Roasted-Chicken-Recipe-Roast-Chicken-with-Salt-GAPS-Legal-How-To-Make-Chicken-On-GAPS-Whole-30-Chicken-Recipe

Let the chicken rest for 20 minutes.

Carve chicken. Because of it’s plain flavor, it can be served alongside any other vegetable side. Or, after eating the skin warm, you can also let the chicken cool and use it in other recipes  such as chicken salad or chicken soup.


Whole Roasted Chicken with Salt

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • Chicken
  • Salt, about 2 tbsp
  • Parchment Paper
  • Aluminum Foil

instructions:

How to cook Whole Roasted Chicken with Salt

  1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. I like to start hot so that the skin cooks and then turn the oven down after it’s been cooking for 15 minutes so it holds the juices in.
  2. Pour your salt into a bowl so you don’t contaminate the rest of the salt.
  3. Rinse and pat dry chicken, inside and outside. Remove the giblets and set aside.
  4. Rub salt all over the chicken, taking care to put salt inside the chicken cavity.
  5. Rinse the giblets. Add the giblets to the inside of the cavity.
  6. Cover with unbleached parchment paper and tinfoil. You don’t want aluminum foil to touch your food. You can also use a dutch oven pan and omit the parchment paper/aluminum foil covering.
  7. Put in the oven.
  8. After about 15 minutes, turn the oven down to 350.
  9. After an hour, check the chicken temperature. Continue cooking chicken for an additional 45 minutes.
  10. Remove foil and parchment paper covering for about the last 5-10 minutes of cooking to brown up the skin. Chicken is done when it reaches 165 internal temperature on a meat thermometer.
  11. Let the chicken rest for 20 minutes.
  12. Carve chicken. Because of it’s plain flavor, it can be served alongside any other vegetable side. Or, after eating the skin warm, you can also let the chicken cool and use it in other recipes such as chicken salad or chicken soup.
Created using The Recipes Generator

How To Travel On the GAPS Diet

Traveling while following the GAPS diet can be challenging. But with the right preparation and choices, it can be possible. Before we talk about specific ideas, let’s talk about the top 3 things that are variables in how you prepare for traveling on GAPS.

Mode of Transportation

When planning what to do, you must first consider what mode or modes of transportation you are taking. Travel by car, bus, train, airplane, or international flight all come with their own difficulties. When you are traveling by car you can pack foods in a cooler, and there is more room for things like hot plates, pots and pans. Air travel can come with limitations on liquids and space, and international travel may have even further limitations. And traveling by bus or train may not bring liquid restrictions, but the items you bring will still be limited by baggage space.

Length of the Trip

The second consideration is the length of the trip. You may be able to omit certain foods like ferments or meat stock if you are gone only a few days, but longer trips would necessitate the need to bring these essentials. On the other hand, a longer trip would give you the opportunity to go to the store, purchase and prepare these essential foods, when there isn’t necessarily enough enough time to do this on a shorter trip.

Your GAPS Stage

Finally, think about what stage you are on, and assess where you are in relation to your health. For example, traveling on Intro stage 1 is very different from traveling on Full GAPS. It’s also important to bring into the calculation how strongly your body is currently reacting if you eat things off your current stage. People on earlier stages and with stronger reactions will have to be more careful and likely need to bring and/or prepare all of the food they eat while traveling.

Great! Now you have thought through the specifics of your trip, now let’s look some options for the foods themselves. The GAPS protocol is, by necessity, intricate and encompassing to make sure that we are supporting your body as well as possible during healing. But during times like travel, there are a few essentials that are most important to continue doing daily, while other (equally important) habits can be skipped for a few days.

What are the essentials to GAPS?

Meat stock, fat and ferments!

So let’s talk about these three.

Meat Stock

Bringing meat stock can seem almost impossible when traveling, especially if you are traveling by plane. And if you are in a stage where you can be without, it is okay to miss this for a day or two. But if your trip gets much longer than that, or if you are traveling while on an early Intro stage, then you need to find a way to have meat stock on your trip.

The two issues with meat stock are space and liquid. You can reduce the space the meat stock takes up by boiling your stock down to a concentrate or even dried bullion that an be reconstituted later. Simply make your stock (chicken is easiest for this), then when it’s done remove the solids and put the liquid back on the stove. Simmer it with the lid off until it is reduced in volume. At this point you can freeze it in snack-pack bags or ice-cube trays.

To further reduce it (and eliminate the liquid problem altogether), you can put it on fruit leather dehydrator trays and remove the rest of the liquid via dehydration. This “meat leather” can be broken into strips and the pieces added to water, or it can be pulverized into bullion powder.

Another option may be to make meat stock where you are going. If you are staying in a house all you need is a quick stop at the store to pick up supplies and you are on your way. But if you are staying at a hotel there are still some options. If you have the space to bring a small hot plate and medium saucepan, you can make stock in small batches in your hotel room. Or you can use and electric kettle or the coffee maker to warm up hot water to reconstitute your “meat leather” or bullion, or use hot water from the hotel lobby or coffee shop.

Fat

Animal fat is so important, especially with the increased and different stressors you will be exposed to during travel. It’s important to continue getting good quality fat.

Freezing your fat in single portion sizes, then traveling with it in a soft cooler (or better yet, checked luggage) is almost always successful even when traveling by air. Then don’t forget to eat it! Bring it with you through your day so you can add it to your meal, or eat it straight or with snack foods like dried fruit.

Traveling home with it may be more tricky, so make sure to have some at home ready to greet you when you return!

Ferments

Getting regular doses of probiotics during your trip is also essential, especially when exposed to unfamiliar foods and microbes. Some people may find that taking a powdered or encapsulated probiotic is sufficient. But others may be depending on that probiotic for stomach acid to digest food and release bile.

If this is the case, many people can get by with eating only the fermented vegetable (no liquid) of their favorite ferment. This shouldn’t get flagged by the TSA. Simply strain the ferment for several hours, letting the juice run into a jar (save for later). Then double-bag the vegetables for easy packing.

If you need that liquid ferment, you will probably have to put it in your checked luggage. I recommend a container that seals well, with plenty of air room, and many bags protecting your clothing! Or you may be able to connect with someone at your destination who can make a ferment for you so it’s ready when you arrive.

A Few Final Notes

Most restaurants will have no problem with you bringing in an addition to their food (like ferments or fat). In fact, if you add it to your dish after you are served, it may go completely unnoticed by anyone even at the table.

Most hotels have a refrigerator available for guest use, even if there isn’t one in your room. If you don’t see one, ask!

International flights may have different rules about what can come into their country, but it seems that for most, as long as it is only a small amount of prepared food for personal use, there isn’t a problem.

And finally, there is a phenomenon that occurs for many people while they travel. The body understands that you are in a different place, and in many cases it can put the current healing mode on hold. This means you may be able to eat more foods with fewer problems than you do at home. This is common, but it does not mean that you are necessarily ready to continue those foods upon your return. In fact, you may find that you need to be even more strict, or drop to a earlier stage for a few days to get your body back to where it was. But if this happens, it usually happens after you return, not during travel. Other people can avoid this dip but being sure to return back to the stage they were on immediately after getting home.

A note on detoxing: While we discussed only food in this post, detoxing is important to continue, and may be even more essential in an environment that is polluted with EMFs and environmental toxins, as well as unfamiliar and potentially unknown foods. I recommend traveling with a bath dechlorinator (I use this one) and a zipper-sealed bag of Epsom salts for detox baths. Additionally, take opportunities to sunbathe and ground, even if just for a few minutes.

Disclosure: Contains an affiliate link, which helps support my blogging. Your trust is important to me, and I only recommend resources I trust.

Fruit Chutney for your Thanksgiving

Happy Thanksgiving!

One of the best things about November is the focus on being grateful and thankful. Everywhere you look there are posts and tweets showing gratitude. And we sure have a lot to be thankful for! Some things are so obvious we often forget to be thankful for. These are things like safe drinking water, warm houses, smart phones and electricity are so everyday for us that we forget how much we have.

Sometime this week, I encourage you to write a list of all the things you have to be thankful for. Don't feel silly including things like water, or your favorite pair of jeans. See how long you can make the list! Even if you don't feel like being thankful, I encourage you to do this exercise—gratitude changes our perception and experience of life, even if nothing is circumstantially different.

This is not to say that you don't have hard things in your life, or that you should pretend they aren't difficult. They are. Hard things are part of life and are very, very real. Remembering that there are good things in your life as well will help YOU through difficult situations.  

As you know, most of my posts (so far, at least) aren't recipes. But it's Thanksgiving! The start of holidays and delicious, rich, made-with-love food. Well this recipe is definitely delicious, rich and made-with-love!

I took the recipe out of Gut and Psychology Syndrome by Dr. Natasha Cambell-McBride. If you are following the GAPS diet this is legal on stage 5 or 6, when you are tolerating dried spices and peppercorns.

This recipe is very simple—chop and combine ingredients, simmer for a while, then store in jars. It would be a great recipe to make in a crockpot... you really could fix it and forget it! But simple doesn't mean plain. It's delicious and adds flavor to any meat you are eating. And I'm told, quite excellent with turkey!  

*This dairy-free, gluten-free, nut-free, sugar-free recipe would be great for gifts as well—ladle into pint jars and add a bow!

Fruit Chutney

Makes 3-4 quarts

Ingredients

  • 2 lbs dried dates (without stones, cut in half)

  • 2 lbs cooking apples (about 7 cups of pieces)

  • 1 lb plumbs (I used packaged prunes)

  • 3 medium onions (about 3 cups, finely diced)

  • 3 peppers (about 2 cups, finely diced)

  • 2 cups raw apple cider vinegar

  • 1-2 tsp whole peppercorns (freshly crushed)

  • 1-2 tsp aromatic seeds (I used cumin and dill)

  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper

  • 1-2 tsp natural salt

Directions:

Cut dates in half (and remove stones (seeds) if needed)

Slowly boil the dates in about 1 cup of water in a large pot until soft (about 10 minutes)

If you live in Colorado like me, and don't use a lid (also like me), you may need to add extra water during this process.

When the dates are soft, turn off heat and mash them with a potato masher—they don't have to be perfectly smooth, just mashed.  

While you were softening the dates, I hope you were furiously chopping! I completely underestimated the time it was going to take to chop everything I needed for this recipe. If you want the process to go smoother, I would recommend chopping everything at the beginning. Then as soon as the dates are soft you can add the rest, stir occasionally, and walk away!

The directions from Dr. Natasha are:

Add everything else to the dates and simmer 1-1/2 hours on very low heat, stirring occasionally.

If you are like me and work better with a little note of panic, then by all means, chop furiously and add things as you chop. For all you step-by-steppers like me, below are pictures to show what I added.

Sterilize the jars.

Dr. Natasha recommends doing this in an oven. I had never done this but it seemed to work great! Place cold jars in a cold oven. Heat the oven to 250°F, then leave it at that temperature for 40 minutes to sterilize the jars. Pull the jars out of the oven one-by-one as you are ready to fill them so they stay hot. Use oven mitts!

Ladle the hot chutney into the jars.

A jar funnel is a lifesaver here!

I left just a little room for air, much less than my fermenting self wanted, but no jars exploded so it must be okay!

Wipe off any chutney on the rim of the jar. Then immediately seal the jar, tightening the lid.

Again, use an oven mitt—the jars are hot!  

Place the jar on the counter, some distance between them.

It's better to not move the jars until they are cool, so place them where you will not need to move them for many hours, overnight is better.

When cool, place the jars into the refrigerator.

This is not a fermented food, so it does require refrigeration.  

Serve with meats and fish. Good cold or warm.

It's delicious! I made this for our Thanksgiving feast in a few days, but tried it out with some chicken today. I enjoyed it thoroughly! I hope you enjoy it as well!

Onward!


Fruit Chutney

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 lbs dried dates (without stones, cut in half)
  • 2 lbs cooking apples (about 7 cups of pieces)
  • 1 lb plumbs (I used packaged prunes)
  • 3 medium onions (about 3 cups, finely diced)
  • 3 peppers (about 2 cups, finely diced)
  • 2 cups raw apple cider vinegar
  • 1-2 tsp whole peppercorns (freshly crushed)
  • 1-2 tsp aromatic seeds (I used cumin and dill)
  • 1 tsp cayenne pepper
  • 1-2 tsp natural salt

instructions:

How to cook Fruit Chutney

  1. Cut dates in half (and remove stones (seeds) if needed)
  2. Slowly boil the dates in about 1 cup of water in a large pot until soft (about 10 minutes)
  3. If you live in Colorado like me, and don't use a lid (also like me), you may need to add extra water during this process.
  4. When the dates are soft, turn off heat and mash them with a potato masher—they don't have to be perfectly smooth, just mashed.
  5. While you were softening the dates, I hope you were furiously chopping! I completely underestimated the time it was going to take to chop everything I needed for this recipe. If you want the process to go smoother, I would recommend chopping everything at the beginning. Then as soon as the dates are soft you can add the rest, stir occasionally, and walk away!
  6. The directions from Dr. Natasha are:
  7. Add everything else to the dates and simmer 1-1/2 hours on very low heat, stirring occasionally.
  8. If you are like me and work better with a little note of panic, then by all means, chop furiously and add things as you chop. For all you step-by-steppers like me, below are pictures to show what I added.
  9. Sterilize the jars.
  10. Dr. Natasha recommends doing this in an oven. I had never done this but it seemed to work great! Place cold jars in a cold oven. Heat the oven to 250°F, then leave it at that temperature for 40 minutes to sterilize the jars. Pull the jars out of the oven one-by-one as you are ready to fill them so they stay hot. Use oven mitts!
  11. Ladle the hot chutney into the jars.
  12. A jar funnel is a lifesaver here!
  13. I left just a little room for air, much less than my fermenting self wanted, but no jars exploded so it must be okay!
  14. Wipe off any chutney on the rim of the jar. Then immediately seal the jar, tightening the lid.
  15. Again, use an oven mitt—the jars are hot!
  16. Place the jar on the counter, some distance between them.
  17. It's better to not move the jars until they are cool, so place them where you will not need to move them for many hours, overnight is better.
  18. When cool, place the jars into the refrigerator.
  19. This is not a fermented food, so it does require refrigeration.
  20. Serve with meats and fish. Good cold or warm.
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Lovely Lard

Eating animal fat is important to our body's health. But eating enough fat can be challenging, especially when there is a dairy allergy. Lard is a great alternative to butter, and its taste is more mild than that of tallow. You can buy lard at the store, but it is expensive and may be hydrogenated or of poor quality. Making your own lard is simple and easy, and can be done for a fraction of the price. To make lard, you first start out with pig fat. This can be obtained from a butcher, or even trimmed off of fatty cuts of pork like the Boston butt. The process of turning fat into lard or tallow is called rendering. In this post I describe rendering lard, but the process for rendering tallow (which is fat from beef, bison, deer, lamb, or elk) is the same, although for tallow it may take a few more hours.   There are two kinds of pig fat. Leaf fat is from fat surrounding the internal organs. It is very mild in taste and used to be reserved for making pies and pastries. Body fat is from the layer of fat beneath the skin. This has a slightly stronger pork taste, and is better used in cooking meat and vegetables. Along with a different taste, there is a different look to the two types of fat. Body fat is in large pieces, and appears more dense and flat. Leaf fat is in smaller pieces, has a fluffier texture, and may contain membranes. The fat you get from a butcher may contain both types of fat. If that is the case, I recommend separating out the two types of fat and rendering them separately so you can use them for different purposes. However, there is no problem in mixing them and rendering them together. (The fat I have pictured below is leaf fat.)  

Making Lard:

First, cut up the pig fat into small 1-2 inch sized cubes. If using leaf fat, remove as much membrane as possible.

Put the fat cubes in a medium saucepan on low heat. You may use a crockpot, but it must have a very low setting or the fat will burn. Stir occasionally and watch closely. Don't let the lard smoke!

With time, the solid pieces of fat will get smaller, and the liquid will increase.

After a few hours, when the lard is liquified, set up your strainer and cloth.

Below you see pictured a jar, jar funnel, and metal strainer. Metal is best because the lard is hot! To finish it off, place a cloth. You can use an old napkin or other cloth, or several layers of cheesecloth.

Pour the liquid into the strainer. The liquid will go into the jar and the cracklings will stay in the cloth.

Squeeze the rest of the liquid out of the cracklings.

Cracklings separated from the liquid lard. Salt and fry these. You can eat them like bacon bits, or just plain.

Allow the jar of lard to cool on the counter.

When the lard is cool you can move it to the fridge, or leave it on the counter.

If you are careful not to contaminate the jar, the lard will last for several months, even left out at room temperature. Use the lard in your cooking— it is a wonderful thing to fry up vegetables or meat and add fat to your diet. Bon appétit!

Onward!


How to Make Lard

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

instructions:

How to cook How to Make Lard

  1. First, cut up the pig fat into small 1-2 inch sized cubes. If using leaf fat, remove as much membrane as possible.
  2. Put the fat cubes in a medium saucepan on low heat. You may use a crockpot, but it must have a very low setting or the fat will burn. Stir occasionally and watch closely. Don't let the lard smoke!
  3. With time, the solid pieces of fat will get smaller, and the liquid will increase.
  4. After a few hours, when the lard is liquified, set up your strainer and cloth.
  5. Below you see pictured a jar, jar funnel, and metal strainer. Metal is best because the lard is hot! To finish it off, place a cloth. You can use an old napkin or other cloth, or several layers of cheesecloth.
  6. Pour the liquid into the strainer. The liquid will go into the jar and the cracklings will stay in the cloth.
  7. Squeeze the rest of the liquid out of the cracklings.
  8. Cracklings separated from the liquid lard. Salt and fry these. You can eat them like bacon bits, or just plain.
  9. Allow the jar of lard to cool on the counter.
  10. When the lard is cool you can move it to the fridge, or leave it on the counter.
  11. If you are careful not to contaminate the jar, the lard will last for several months, even left out at room temperature. Use the lard in your cooking— it is a wonderful thing to fry up vegetables or meat and add fat to your diet. Bon appétit!
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The Root Cause of Asthma {Video}

Asthma

It is currently one of the most common diseases in the civilized world. But did you know that despite all of our medical advances, the occurrence, as well as complications and deaths related to asthma have skyrocketed? Asthma is more common than it used to be, and it's also more severe. Since 1980, the death rates for asthma have increased by more than 50% [1] In fact, asthma deaths were considered rare in the early 1900's [2]. So what changed?  

There were three major changes:

First, our world became more toxic. The effects of industrialization had taken its toll on our air, water and food. Additionally, we began to manufacture food-like substances to replace real food. These food-like substances are full of chemicals and preservatives, which had an unknown effect on the human body.  

Second, we replaced saturated animal fats with hydrogenated vegetable oils and trans-fatty acids. This was a double whammy on our lungs. We removed the substance it relied most heavily on to function properly (saturated fat) and gave it a replacement fat full of toxins and unknown substances that it now had to deal with.  

Third, medications like bronchodilators and other inhalers were invented. This forces the airways open against the body's desire to close off an area to allow for lung repair. Before medication were invented, asthma rarely caused death and was generally considered a benign condition.   To find out more about the root cause of asthma, and how the body works, check out my new video below!  

References: [1] http://www.asthmamd.org/asthma-statistics/ [2] http://www.atsjournals.org/doi/full/10.1164/rccm.200402-185OE

Why Soak Grains? {Video}

Ever wondered about recommendations like "soaking," "sprouting," "fermenting," or "properly preparing" your nuts or grains? Ever wondered what that meant, or why it's better? I did! In fact, when I first heard about "sprouted bread," I thought it was made-up. But there are real reasons why eating properly prepared seeds is better for your body. Check out the video below to find out why.

Did that make sense?

This is just one example of why food preparation matters. And while food preparation techniques used to be passed on from generation to generation, our modern western culture has largely lost that heritage. But some do remember. And some do research. And some teach. And some write it down for us. That is the entire reason behind the cookbook, Nourishing Traditions, by Sally Fallon. Traditional ways to prepare foods in traditional recipes are recorded in this helpful resource. If we want to return to health, we need to start understanding these principles. Our health depends on it! Still have questions? Have another food preparation question? Ask it in the comments below.

Disclosure: The link in this post is an affiliate link. Links like this help support my blogging. Your trust is important to me, and I only recommend resources I trust.

Decadent Hot Chocolate

Winter is here in full force... the weather is cold, snow storms are common, and the evenings are dark and long. It's a great time to stay in, cuddle up in a blanket, and drink hot chocolate.

"Hot chocolate?" you ask. "I'm on (GAPS, WAPF, SCD, Paleo) and not eating processed food—how in the world can I drink hot chocolate?" Well, I'm about to tell you. I have also been without hot chocolate for a long time, but inspiration struck and I can now present you with an amazing hot chocolate recipe.

No really, it's amazing. Rich, thick, decadent, filling, indulging, chocolaty goodness.   

It even passed the skeptical, hot chocolate-loving teenage boy test.  

Which is a big deal.   And it's a nutrient-dense food!  

Are you ready?

Without further ado, here is the...

Decadent Hot Chocolate Recipe

*Legal on Paleo, SCD, WAPF, and Full GAPS (if tolerating milk and cocoa powder)

—Makes 2 large or 3 medium mugs of hot cocoa—

Ingredients:

  • 3 cups Milk (Raw)

  • 2 Eggs

  • 6-8 TBS Honey

  • 4 tsp Cocoa Powder

  • 1/8 tsp Sea Salt

  • 1/4 tsp Vanilla

Directions for raw milk hot chocolate:

Over low-medium heat, mix:

  • 2 cups milk

  • 2 eggs

  • 6-8 TBS honey

  • 1/8 tsp salt

Stir or whisk constantly:

Whisk over low to medium heat for about 5-8 minutes, until the mixture coats the back of a spoon (if you have ever made ice cream, this is the same process as making the base)

Remove From Heat:

When the spoon is coated, remove from the heat (or you will get milky scrambled eggs!)

Whisk in:

  • 1/4 tsp Vanilla

  • 4 tsp Cocoa powder

(in this picture we did this in a cup because we were experimenting... you should add these ingredients to the saucepan—it's much easier)

Whisk until frothy

Pour into mugs, filling each mug about 2/3 full

Finish filling the mugs by carefully pouring plain milk (warmed or cool) down the inside of the mug (so as not to disturb the foam on top)

Add a few GAPS marshmallows if desired

For an added option (adults only!) I recommend adding a little rum

Serve and enjoy!

...you can clean up the mess later..


Raw Milk Hot Chocolate

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 3 cups Milk (Raw)
  • 2 Eggs
  • 6-8 TBS Honey
  • 4 tsp Cocoa Powder
  • 1/8 tsp Sea Salt
  • 1/4 tsp Vanilla

instructions:

How to cook Raw Milk Hot Chocolate

  1. Over low-medium heat, mix:  cups milk, 2 eggs, 6-8 TBS honey, 1/8 tsp salt.
  2. Whisk over low to medium heat for about 5-8 minutes, until the mixture coats the back of a spoon (if you have ever made ice cream, this is the same process as making the base)
  3. When the spoon is coated, remove from the heat (or you will get milky scrambled eggs!)
  4. Whisk in: 1/4 tsp Vanilla, 4 tsp Cocoa powder
  5. (in this picture we did this in a cup because we were experimenting... you should add these ingredients to the saucepan—it's much easier)
  6. Whisk until frothy
  7. Pour into mugs, filling each mug about 2/3 full
  8. Finish filling the mugs by carefully pouring plain milk (warmed or cool) down the inside of the mug (so as not to disturb the foam on top)
  9. Add a few GAPS marshmallows if desired
  10. For an added option (adults only!) I recommend adding a little rum
  11. Serve and enjoy!
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