Basics of GAPS

DIY Almond Flour from Nuts

Any seed wants to be a plant. Seeds include nuts, seeds, beans, and grains. To protect itself, a seed has phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. These substances attack the body of the animal that ate the seed, preventing the digestion of the seed. This is why we see whole seeds in bird poop.

Manually grinding seeds into flours does nothing to negate these enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. We may not necessarily see whole seeds in our stools but we don’t need to for our bodies to experience the effects of these substances. Inflammation, poor absorption of foods, and leaky gut are some of the effects on our bodies of eating seeds that are not properly prepared. To learn more about properly preparing grains, check out my video.

HOW TO PREPARE GRAINS PROPERLY

When we properly prepare our grains however, we begin the germination process, which changes the seeds chemical structure. It neutralizes the anti-nutrients and enzyme inhibitors, and the seed prepares to bring life. When we eat a seed in this state, it’s nutrients are available to us and it brings life to our bodies.  

All seeds can be prepared in three ways - soaking, sprouting or fermenting. Fermenting is by far the most simple and the most beneficial. All it requires is whey. These directions are for almond flour but you can use the same concept to any nut, seed, or grain. For specific instructions on how to do this with whole seeds, see my recipe on trail mix.

The other benefit of using fermented almond flour is that it makes a much lighter end product. The fermentation process acts somewhat like a baking soda or powder, increasing the air space as your treat bakes, making it less dense.

This is a great way to make fermented almond flour if your recipe calls for a very specific ratio of wet to dry ingredients. It’s also great for recipes that call for frying, like these onion rings!

You can also make fermented flour with almonds already made into flour. See the recipe here.

Ingredients for Making Almond Flour from Fermented Nuts

  • 3 cups Almonds

  • ½ cup Whey

  • Filtered Water

Directions for Making Almond Flour from Fermented Nuts

Place your almonds in filtered water with whey. Allow to soak for 24 hours.

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Drain the almonds in a colander and rinse with filtered water.

For the easiest almond flour, peel the almonds by squeezing them between your fingers until the skins pop off.

Drain the almonds well. If you don’t drain them well, your flour will be wet.

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Place almonds into a food processor. Pulse them consistently for about 60 seconds in one second pulses. Scrape the sides of the food processor consistently to ensure almonds are all blended to the same size.

Don’t pulse for too long or you will get almond butter!


DIY Almond Flour

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 3 cups Almonds
  • ½ cup Whey
  • Filtered Water

instructions:

How to cook DIY Almond Flour

  1. Place your almonds in filtered water with whey. Allow to soak for 24 hours.
  2. Drain the almonds in a colander and rinse with filtered water.
  3. For the easiest almond flour, peel the almonds by squeezing them between your fingers until the skins pop off.
  4. Drain the almonds well. If you don’t drain them well, your flour will be wet.
  5. Place almonds into a food processor. Pulse them consistently for about 60 seconds in one second pulses. Scrape the sides of the food processor consistently to ensure almonds are all blended to the same size.
  6. Don’t pulse for too long or you will get almond butter!
Created using The Recipes Generator

Northern Colorado GAPS Group Meeting Recap May 21, 2019

Each week, we gather in Northern Colorado for a meetup centered around the GAPS Diet, started by Dr. Natasha Campbell. During these meetups, we have a lesson about a fundamental aspect of the GAPS Diet, exchange recipes and ideas, support each other through the GAPS Diet, and learn something new from a holistic healthcare speaker or presenter.

The first GAPS Group meeting that you attend is FREE.

If you find the information helpful, individual classes are $15 to attend, or you can buy a punch card for five classes that brings down the cost to $10 per class (recommended). We'll have punch cards for sale when you arrive at Tuesday's meeting.

If you can't make it in-person, we're happy to send you a link for you to watch us LIVE. Send an email to Office@bewellclinic.net to request the link to the broadcast! Costs will still apply to virtual attendance, so we recommend that you come join us to receive all of the benefits of the meeting.

GAPS Group Meeting May 21st, 2019

This week was a recipe presentation on sauerkraut!

This week, the Be Well Clinic’s own Lauren Isenhour did a recipe demonstration on how to make sauerkraut. You can find the directions on how to make your own saurkraut here.

Sauerkraut is a GAPS staple and a delicious ferment to keep in the house. It’s also extremely easy to make! These food demonstrations are a great reason to come to the GAPS Group Meeting because they are supplemental to the blog post recipes. It’s a great way to learn a new way to cook or think about food and it can be helpful to see how to make something first hand. The most important part of this recipe is to note the change in the texture of the cabbage as the salt does it’s job to break down the cell walls of the cabbage. This change is noticeable in a short period of time as you can see by the photos below!

Amy also presented on supplements and how to correctly supplement your food as your body needs it. Amy shared on the benefits of supplements like fermented cod liver oil, iodine, ox bile, and probiotics (which sauerkraut is a great source off!) She also shared about the die-off reaction that happens as we change our health and how to recognize and manage those symptoms.

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JOIN US AT OUR NEXT GAPS GROUP MEETING!

Next week's GAPS Group Meeting is the start of a new Getting Started on GAPS Session! Come meet the members of Be Well Clinic's GAPS Group and share your stories.

Our lesson is on Intro GAPS. Amy will share how the stages work and how to nourish the body and heal the gut. We'll talk about how and why all diseases begin in the gut and how you can change your health by healing your gut.

If you feel like you're well-versed on the practical applications of GAPS, you're welcome to skip this part of the meeting and join us at 7:00 PM for our recipe sharing and discussion. This week's we're talking about vegetable ferments!

The Recipe Sharing and Discussion is one of the best things about GAPS Group! You get to try delicious food, and take home the recipe so you can recreate it! It's a great way to diversify your GAPS go-tos, and you get to catch up with everyone on their progress. Sometimes, hearing someone else's success story is the best way to get you to keep going.

Location:
GAPS Group is currently held at the Loveland Outlets, very close to our new office space. It’s located north of McWhinney Blvd. next to The Studio, near Tommy Hilfiger and Sketchers. The best way to get there is to set your GPS to 5613 McWhinney Blvd, Loveland, CO 80538 and walk to suite 5609. Get more details on the exact location here.

See more information and RSVP to the event on our Facebook page.

Northern Colorado GAPS Group Meeting Recap April 30th, 2019

Each week, we gather in Northern Colorado for a meetup centered around the GAPS Diet, started by Dr. Natasha Campbell. During these meetups, we have a lesson about a fundamental aspect of the GAPS Diet, exchange recipes and ideas, support each other through the GAPS Diet, and learn something new from a holistic healthcare speaker or presenter.

The first GAPS Group meeting that you attend is FREE.

If you find the information helpful, individual classes are $15 to attend, or you can buy a punch card for five classes that brings down the cost to $10 per class (recommended). We'll have punch cards for sale when you arrive at Tuesday's meeting.

If you can't make it in-person, we're happy to send you a link for you to watch us LIVE. Send an email to Office@bewellclinic.net to request the link to the broadcast! Costs will still apply to virtual attendance, so we recommend that you come join us to receive all of the benefits of the meeting.

GAPS Group Meeting April 30th, 2019

This week’s presenter was Dr. Carl Malone of The Natural Path.

Dr. Tiffany Wall talked to us about the communication pathways within our bodies, and how stress alone can knock our bodies so far off balance that we get and stay sick.
Then Amy talked about the GAPS protocol and its aims. First and foremost, we want to normalize the fur flora. We also want to heal and seal the gut lining, restore gut function, and restore immunity. The protocol has three parts to it:1: GAPS Diet2: Supplementation3: Detoxing 
She talked in detail about all of them, but the most interesting one was the die-off reaction that results from repopulating our bodies with good bacteria. 

At one point, she said “sometimes your body has to remind you that what you just ate is not food. I know you tried to eat it as food, but it’s not food”

After our Getting Started on GAPS lesson ended, we all stayed to shared GAPS Legal Recipes and hang out. We swapped stories about things we have and haven't tried, talked about our favorite oils, and enjoyed the food! Finding others on the GAPS journey at the same time is a key to your success!

At our meeting, we learned about two soups, a cauliflower rice casserole, and lots and lots of animal fats. You know it's a GAPS meeting because everyone remembers to bring the butter and sour cream!

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Join us at our next GAPS Group Meeting!

Next week's GAPS Group Meeting is the start of a new Getting Started on GAPS Session! Come meet the members of Be Well Clinic's GAPS Group and share your stories.

Our lesson is on Intro GAPS. Amy will share how the stages work and how to nourish the body and heal the gut. We'll talk about how and why all diseases begin in the gut and how you can change your health by healing your gut.

If you feel like you're well-versed on the practical applications of GAPS, you're welcome to skip this part of the meeting and join us at 7:00 PM for our recipe sharing and discussion. This week's we're talking about vegetable ferments!

The Recipe Sharing and Discussion is one of the best things about GAPS Group! You get to try delicious food, and take home the recipe so you can recreate it! It's a great way to diversify your GAPS go-tos, and you get to catch up with everyone on their progress. Sometimes, hearing someone else's success story is the best way to get you to keep going.

Location:
GAPS Group is currently held at the Loveland Outlets, very close to our new office space. It’s located north of McWhinney Blvd. next to The Studio, near Tommy Hilfiger and Sketchers. The best way to get there is to set your GPS to 5613 McWhinney Blvd, Loveland, CO 80538 and walk to suite 5609. Get more details on the exact location here.

See more information and RSVP to the event on our Facebook page.

How to Properly Caramelize Onions

Caramelized onions are an amazing supporting food because they are high in vitamin C, calcium, and quercetin. It’s especially helpful for sore throats but is an excellent food to eat anytime you are starting to feel under the weather! (Check out more of my helpful tips for caring for yourself when you’re sick here.)

I recommend a whole onion per person because the onions will reduce in size. You want to use a lot of animal fat with this recipe! I like both butter or lard, so whatever you happen to have on hand is ok. The fat is also great for you while you’re sick. Make sure you add enough salt for the added minerals, which is also very important when you’re ill.

White or yellow onions work for this recipe. I prefer the yellow onions and often have them on hand so that is what I usually use.

For great caramelized onions, make sure your heat is on low. This is a food that is best with patience - and burnt with impatience. Allow 20 - 30 minutes of cooking time to get really good caramelized onions. You can cook multiple onions at a time as long as you are using a large enough pan. If your entire family is sick, you can make a batch for everyone in about the same amount of time as cooking just one.

When slicing your onions, you want to slice them in short slices. Don’t give into the temptation of dicing your onions! Even if it seems they will cook faster, you’ll most likely end up with a burnt or mushy dish.

Make sure you don’t crowd your pan of onions or they won’t properly caramelize. Above is the maximum amount of onions I would put in one pan.

Caramelized onions should be sweet! They shouldn’t really taste like onions at all when they’re finished! As they cook, take a taster. If it still tastes like onions, keep stirring.

Dr Natasha recommends topping a caramelized onion with a little olive oil and a couple fried eggs. (Again fried in plenty of fat.) This is a very filling meal that’s amazing when you’re sick.

However, you don’t need to be sick to enjoy this nourishing food! It can be very soothing when you’ve had a long day and are needing a comfort food.

Ingredients for Caramelized Onions:

  • 2-3 Tbsp Fat of Your Choice Per Onion

  • Onion (1 Per Person)

  • Salt (The amount of salt will vary if you’re using salted butter or unsalted lard.)

Directions for Caramelized Onions:

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Slice the ends of your onion and peel. Put the peels and “extras” into a bag for use in stock later.

Cut the onion in half. Then cut into half again.

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Slice the onion so long strips form.

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Start your pan heating on medium high and add the fat of your choice. Heating your pan before your onion is sliced will result in a pan that is too hot.

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Add your onions to the pan. Stir to coat in the fat.

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Cook onions over medium heat, stirring every few minutes.

When they are nearing translucency (about 25 ish minutes) add a little salt if you are not using salted butter. Even if you are using salted butter, adding a little extra salt will help them break down.

Make sure everyone salts their onions to taste once the onions are on their plates!

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Your onions are done when they are golden brown. Enjoy them on their own or as part of a larger meal.


Caramelized Onions

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2-3 Tbsp Fat of Your Choice Per Onion
  • Onion (1 Per Person)
  • Salt (The amount of salt will vary if you’re using salted butter or unsalted lard.)

instructions:

How to cook Caramelized Onions

  1. Slice the ends of your onion and peel. Put the peels and “extras” into a bag for use in stock later.
  2. Cut the onion in half. Then cut into half again.
  3. Slice the onion so long strips form.
  4. Start your pan heating on medium high and add the fat of your choice. Heating your pan before your onion is sliced will result in a pan that is too hot.
  5. Add your onions to the pan. Stir to coat in the fat.
  6. Cook onions over medium heat, stirring every few minutes.
  7. When they are nearing translucency (about 25 ish minutes) add a little salt if you are not using salted butter. Even if you are using salted butter, adding a little extra salt will help them break down.
  8. Make sure everyone salts their onions to taste once the onions are on their plates!
  9. Your onions are done when they are golden brown. Enjoy them on their own or as part of a larger meal.
Created using The Recipes Generator

How to Make Cabbage Tonic

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. This cabbage tonic can be taken from the beginning of the Intro Diet of GAPS. Use this tonic daily to help change your gut flora. As with all probiotic foods, make sure you begin with only a small amount, about a tablespoon at a time, keeping an eye out for symptoms of die off. If none are present, you can continue gradually increasing your daily amount and the frequency that you consume this tonic throughout the day.

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. This cabbage tonic can be taken from the beginning of the Intro Diet of GAPS. Use this tonic daily to help change your gut flora. As with all probiotic foods, make sure you begin with only a small amount, about a tablespoon at a time, keeping an eye out for symptoms of die off. If none are present, you can continue gradually increasing your daily amount and the frequency that you consume this tonic throughout the day.

When you do ferments, your intention and energy really does affect the taste of the ferments. If you’re stressed, it will show in the food. Do ferments at a time that you’re relaxed and enjoying being in the kitchen. If this is not your mindset, take a couple minutes to reset, thinking about how this work is bringing such amazing health and healing to your body and your family. After your mindset is set, smile and preparing your ferment!

When doing ferments, it is important to hand wash your jars. A lot of dishwashers leave a film of soap, even if you’re using a natural soap. Make sure you rinse your jar well with hot water. It’s not necessary to sterilize your jar; we’re not canning. Fermentation creates a live food that will take care of the bad bacteria.

Tidbit from Nourishing Traditions: “Add ¼ - ½ tsp cayenne pepper to 4 ounces of cabbage tonic for a gargle and sore throat remedy.

This recipe is based on the Nourishing Traditions cookbook by Sally Fallon on page 614.

Ingredients for Cabbage Tonic:

  • ¼ Organic Green Cabbage

  • 1 tsp Sea Salt

  • ¼ Cup Whey

  • Filtered Water

Directions for Cabbage Tonic:

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Shred cabbage finely with a knife. You want small even pieces so it ferments evenly. (Similar to cutting onions for even cooking.)

Add cabbage and salt to a bowl.

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Using your hands, squish the cabbage for about a minute.

Let the cabbage sit for five minutes.

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Squish the cabbage again for a minute.

Put cabbage in a 2 quart jar with whey.

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Add enough water to fill the container.

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Cover tightly.

Leave at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to the fridge.


Cabbage Tonic

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ¼ Organic Green Cabbage
  • 1 tsp Sea Salt
  • ¼ Cup Whey
  • Filtered Water

instructions:

How to cook Cabbage Tonic

  1. Shred cabbage finely with a knife. You want small even pieces so it ferments evenly. (Similar to cutting onions for even cooking.)
  2. Add cabbage and salt to a bowl.
  3. Using your hands, squish the cabbage for about a minute.
  4. Let the cabbage sit for five minutes.
  5. Squish the cabbage again for a minute.
  6. Put cabbage in a 2 quart jar with whey.
  7. Add enough water to fill the container.
  8. Cover tightly.
  9. Leave at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to the fridge.
Created using The Recipes Generator

All About Fruits and Vegetables

Sweet fruits! Is there anything better than a juicy peach on a summer’s day or a bright red strawberry, straight from the garden and bursting with tart flavor? And vegetables! Their cooling crunch, the endless ways to season them up and add them to everything.

Plants like fruits and vegetables cleanse our bodies. They help our bodies to process and remove the toxins that we are exposed to on a daily basis from the environment around us, even if we do our best to avoid toxins. We mostly benefit from the fiber, antioxidants, enzymes, and other detoxifying substances.

Drinking fresh juices made up of both fruits and vegetables is one of the easiest ways to enjoy the rich nutritional benefits of produce. Adding fruit into juices will especially help children in getting all the benefits that juicing can offer.

Fruits, nuts, and other treats should be limited, even on Full GAPS. So treat yourself to an occasional piece of fruit but don’t overdo it! To see a full list of fruits and vegetables that are acceptable on the GAPS Diet, click here.

Good Fruits and Vegetables: The Clean 15 and the Dirty Dozen

If you’re on a strict food budget or looking for a small change that can have a large impact, try purchasing “The Clean 15.” A non-profit group called the Environmental Working Group conducts ongoing research about pesticides that are in (and on) our food and creates a guide to produce pesticides, which they update every year. They rank 48 popular fruits and vegetables, with the “Clean 15” being the top fifteen fruits and vegetables with the least amount of pesticides.

For fruits in 2019, the “Clean 15” which you can purchase the non-organic versions are:

  • Avocados

  • Pineapples

  • Papayas

  • Kiwi

  • Cantaloupe

  • Honeydew Melons

For vegetables in 2019, the "Clean 15" which you can purchase the non-organic versions are:

  • Sweet Corn

  • Sweet Peas

  • Onions

  • Eggplants

  • Asparagus

  • Cabbage

  • Cauliflower

  • Broccoli

  • Mushrooms

A note on Genetically Engineered seeds: The Environmental Working Group has said that a small amount of papaya, sweet corn, and summer squash sold in the U.S. is produced from Genetically Engineered seeds. To avoid Genetically Engineered produce, buy papayas organic.

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Conversely, the “Dirty Dozen” are fruits that you really want to purchase organically. These are the top twelve fruits and vegetables that contain pesticides so to keep yourself toxin free, it’s important to purchase organic.

For fruits in 2019, the “Dirty Dozen” that should be purchased organically are:

  • Strawberries

  • Nectarines

  • Apples

  • Grapes

  • Peaches

  • Cherries

  • Pears

For vegetables in 2019, the "Dirty Dozen" that should be purchased organically are:

  • Spinach

  • Kale

  • Tomatoes

  • Celery

  • Potatoes

  • Hot Peppers

Better Fruits and Vegetables: Purchasing High Quality Organic Always

Organic means produce is grown without synthetic pesticides, synthetic fertilizers or genetically modified organisms.  Purchasing all of your fruits and vegetables organically is beneficial for you and beneficial for the plant! If you’re looking for the better choice in produce, try purchasing high quality organic fruits and vegetables.

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Best Fruits and Vegetables: Eating Local and in Season

The best choice when it comes to choosing fruits and vegetables is to eat local and in season fruit. Eating in season means your food is fresher and better tasting! Eating local is also better for the environment because your food travels less miles to be on your table.

To buy local, in season fruits and vegetables, you can check for local farming co-ops or farmer’s markets. Buying local also means you’re supporting a small business. It’s a win-win-win all around! Or consider growing your own fruits and vegetables if you have the space!

To find in-season fruits and vegetables no matter where you are, try the Seasonal Food Guide website.

The Best Way to Add Fermented Food to Your Diet

Fermenting - one of the best things I discovered on my journey of healing!

The process of preserving food by fermenting it is something that’s been around for centuries and is practiced all other world. It’s not just the process of creating alcoholic beverages like beer or wine, or creating different types of dairy like cheese or yogurt.  Eating fermented foods is a huge part of the GAPS Diet, but anyone who adds fermented foods to their diet will see some benefit.

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There’s so many benefits to fermenting!  Fermenting food means you’re helping beneficial bacteria and yeast grow that aid in digestion. Fermented foods are packed full of probiotics, which helps your gut health. It also boosts immunity by producing lactic acid, which pathogenic bacteria cannot live in the presence of. It allows you to preserve food longer which means that you’re throwing less away! It also increases the nutritional availability without adding anything extra.

While any type of ferment that you consume is beneficial, there are good, better, and best ways to ferment.

Good: Buying a Ferment at the Store

There are a variety of common ferments that are available at most grocery stores. Starting small and adding just one ferment to your diet will bring some benefit to your gut health and overall wellbeing.

While purchasing a ferment from a store isn’t the most beneficial for your wallet or your health, if you want to dip your toes into fermented foods, purchasing one can be just fine. Find one that has the least amount of ingredients possible and has the least amount of processing. Fermented foods should be as close to the source as they can be.

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Better: Buying Multiple Ferments at the Store

There are many kinds of fermented foods so experiment! Adding a variety of ferments to your diet is important because you and your gut will get a much wider variety of bacteria, all naturally. Fermented foods come in many different varieties, like pickled vegetables, sauerkraut, or even liquids like kombucha and kefir.

A better option for getting ferments into your diet is to purchase a variety of high quality ferments from the store.

Best: Making and Consuming Your Own Variety of Ferments

Making your own ferments is absolutely the best! I love making my own ferments because I can buy large quantities of food in season and locally and preserve it for a long time. I also know what I’m eating because I added it myself!

Consuming a variety of different kinds of ferments is important for our gut health. By making your own, you can save a lot of money and get all the variety you need!

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When you make your own ferments, you’re intimately connected with what you’re eating. This is important for thoughtful eating.

If you’re interested in fermenting your own food, I’ve shared a lot about fermenting over the years! You can see more on the process of fermenting here and here, and specifically about lacto-fermenting here. Whey is a great way (get it!) to start the fermentation process for many ferments. You can learn about making your own whey here.

For recipes on fermenting food, check out my beet kvass recipe, my recipe for fermented garlic (learn more about the benefits of fermented garlic) or learn how to ferment almond flour for baking.

10 Ways to Consume Meat Stock

Meat stock is one of the pillars of a healthy gut diet. While bone broth is getting a lot of press lately, I don’t recommend it for most people. (Learn more about why I recommend meat stock over bone broth here.) Meat stock really gets a gold medal as a great nutrient dense food that can boost your immunity, help with healing allergies, and is easy to digest, especially for those with a leaky gut. Even better, meat stock is meant to be a meal all on it’s own! You can make meat stock with any meat, though I think chicken meat stock is the easiest beginner stock.

Consuming meat stock is a habit I encourage my clients to do throughout the day because of it’s great health benefits. There are many ways to consume meat stock and some creative ways so that you don’t get bored with consuming meat stock frequently. Here’s a few of my favorites!

Vary Your Meat Stock Recipe

Try adding different spices and herbs to your meat stock recipe when you cook it. This will change the taste to keep it interesting. You can also vary the vegetables and aromatics that you add - or add no aromatics like onions and your dogs can consume your meat stock as well!

Consuming meat stock is an important part of the GAPS Diet but having it the same over and over can grow tiring. Here are ten unique and creative ways to consume meat stock whether you're on the GAPS Diet or not. Northern Colorado Holistic healthcare provided by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Have It Warm

Heated stock is a great warming beverage, especially on cool winter mornings. Keeping heated stock in a mug next to you will allow you to drink it alongside your morning meal.

If you’re on the go, keep your heated stock in a thermos so it stays warm throughout the day. Then you can sip on it just like a tea or coffee.

Eat It Cold

Drinking cold stock is very refreshing on a hot summer day!

If your stock gets a good gel at the top, you can simply pop the gel off the top of your stock and eat it cold like a meat jelly.

Use Meat Stock as a Base

Meat stock makes an excellent base for different soups and other recipes. I’ve been partial to this chicken tortilla soup recipe recently but you can make it into any variety of soup that sounds delicious.

Add an Egg (or Two)

You can poach eggs in warm stock for a delicious breakfast. Use the stock as a replacement for the water that you would normally poach eggs in.

Or, break and stir a few egg yolks only into warm stock. This will create a cheesy tasting drink that is delicious.

Consume Meat Stock on the Go

Traveling can bring up a whole host of stressors and traveling on the GAPS Diet means paying closer attention to your food. Since meat stock is one of the pillars of the GAPS Diet, it’s important to factor it into your travel plans. There’s a few different ways to consume meat stock on the go, from dehydrating it to making it when you get there.

What are your favorite ways to consume meat stock? If you have other ideas, share them in the comments below!

Northern Colorado GAPS Group Meeting Recap February 28, 2019

Each week, we gather in Northern Colorado for a meetup centered around the GAPS Diet, started by Dr. Natasha Campbell. During these meetups, we have a lesson about a fundamental aspect of the GAPS Diet, exchange recipes and ideas, support each other through the GAPS Diet, and learn something new from a holistic healthcare speaker or presenter.

The first GAPS Group meeting that you attend is FREE.

If you find the information helpful, individual classes are $15 to attend, or you can buy a punch card for five classes that brings down the cost to $10 per class (recommended). We'll have punch cards for sale when you arrive at Tuesday's meeting.

If you can't make it in-person, we're happy to send you a link for you to watch us LIVE. Send an email to Office@bewellclinic.net to request the link to the broadcast! Costs will still apply to virtual attendance, so we recommend that you come join us to receive all of the benefits of the meeting.

GAPS Group Meeting February 26, 2019

This week's presenter was Dr. Carl Malone of The Natural Path.

Carl Malone holds a Bioenergetic Doctorate and a Doctor of Natural Medicine degree. He is trained in Neuro Emotional Release Technique (NET) and Nutritional Response Testing (NRT). Carl extensively uses cold laser therapy for pain, inflammation and neurological disorders as well as for performance tune-ups for athletes and weekend warriors. The Natural Path was started because of his passion to help people attain their highest level of vitality. His practice combines the health-building attributes of whole-food nutrition with advanced biofeedback, muscle testing and light technologies to reach this goal. Learn more about him here.

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Attendees of Tuesday's meetup said Dr. Malone's demo of how NET (Neuro Emotional Technique) works was fascinating. He shared a handout on the fast solution to stress, making it easy to remember and do.

Join us at our next GAPS Group Meeting!

Next week's GAPS Group Meeting is on Practicals. This time, Amy's telling us about some practical applications of the GAPS protocol. We'll hear about treating about healing common ailments like ear infections, nose and throat problems, dry skin, and eye problems. This is a great lesson for anyone that doesn't quite understand everything that the GAPS protocol can do for their health and want to know more. I really enjoy this lesson because it reminds me just how important it is to adhere to the protocol when healing, because it can affect such common symptoms that most of us think are normal.

If you feel like you're well-versed on the practical applications of GAPS, you're welcome to skip this part of the meeting and join us at 7:00 PM for our recipe sharing and discussion.

The Recipe Sharing and Discussion is one of the best things about GAPS Group! You get to try delicious food, and take home the recipe so you can recreate it! It's a great way to diversify your GAPS go-tos, and you get to catch up with everyone on their progress. Sometimes, hearing someone else's success story is the best way to get you to keep going.

Location:

GAPS Group is currently held at the Loveland Outlets, very close to our new office space. It’s located north of McWhinney Blvd. next to The Studio, near Tommy Hilfiger and Sketchers. The best way to get there is to set your GPS to 5613 McWhinney Blvd, Loveland, CO 80538 and walk to suite 5609. Get more details on the exact location here.

See more information and RSVP to the event on our Facebook page.

Russian Custard

GAPS Legal Custard Dessert

Russian custard is a delicious desert or afternoon snack. It is rich, and just sweet enough. You can whip it up in just a few minutes, and it is easy to double or triple to feed another (or more for yourself).

Russian custard is just two ingredients: raw egg yolks and honey. Don't let the raw egg yolk stop you! The texture and taste of the custard are very different than that of a raw egg yolk. I've had multiple people express their pleasant surprise at how much they like it (despite being reluctant to try it because of the egg yolks). So give it a try—it just might become a favorite of yours!

For people on GAPS, this recipe is legal as early as Intro Stage 2

Russian Custard Recipe

Ingredients for Russian Custard:

  • 2 Eggs*

  • 1/2 - 1 tsp Honey

*As per the usual warning, eating undercooked or raw eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness.

You can multiply this recipe for as many servings as you want. The above ratio is for one serving.

Directions for Russian Custard:

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Separate the egg yolks from the egg whites. Place the yolks in a separate bowl.

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Add honey to the egg yolks. I find 1/2 tsp of honey to be plenty and very sweet. You can add more if you need it. Or less.

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Beat the egg yolks with a whisk until they are thick and change color. They should look much lighter, with a little white undertone. This takes about five minutes. A fork does not work well for whisking!

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Serve in a small bowl for a delicious dessert or mid-afternoon snack.

This custard recipe is no bake and includes only two ingredients. It's dairy free and gluten free. It makes for a delicious dessert for one or you can multiple it for as many servings as you like. The entire recipe takes about five minutes. Recipe by certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly, Be Well Clinic.

Russian Custard

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 2 Eggs*
  • 1/2 - 1 tsp Honey
  • *As per the usual warning, eating undercooked or raw eggs may increase your risk of foodborne illness.
  • You can multiply this recipe for as many servings as you want. The above ratio is for one serving.

instructions:

How to cook Russian Custard

  1. Separate the egg yolks from the egg whites. Place the yolks in a separate bowl.
  2. Add honey to the egg yolks. I find 1/2 tsp of honey to be plenty and very sweet. You can add more if you need it. Or less.
  3. Beat the egg yolks with a whisk until they are thick and change color. They should look much lighter, with a little white undertone. This takes about five minutes. A fork does not work well for whisking!
  4. Serve in a small bowl for a delicious dessert or mid-afternoon snack.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Swedish Gravlax Recipe

This meal is adapted from GAPS Cookbook by Dr. Natasha Campbell

This is a brined fish meal legal on GAPS stage 2. You eat little pieces, one small piece a day.

Swedish Gravlax Recipe

Ingredients for Swedish Gravlax:

  • ½ lb Fresh Wild Caught Salmon

  • Fresh Dill

  • Freshly Coarsely Ground Black Pepper

  • 4 cup Room Temperature Filtered Water

  • 1 tbsp Honey

  • 1 ½ tbsp Salt

Directions for Swedish Gravlax:

Swedish-Gravlax-Fermented-Salmon-Wild-Caught-Salmon-What-To-Do-With-Salmon-GAPS-Legal-Salmon-Recipe-GAPS-Diet-Salmon-Fish-On-GAPS-GAPS-Diet-Snack

Thinly slice the fish.

Swedish-Gravlax-Fermented-Salmon-Wild-Caught-Salmon-What-To-Do-With-Salmon-GAPS-Legal-Salmon-Recipe-GAPS-Diet-Salmon-Fish-On-GAPS-GAPS-Diet-Snack

Place fish slices into a deep tray.

Sprinkle with dill sprigs and pepper.

Swedish-Gravlax-Fermented-Salmon-Wild-Caught-Salmon-What-To-Do-With-Salmon-GAPS-Legal-Salmon-Recipe-GAPS-Diet-Salmon-Fish-On-GAPS-GAPS-Diet-Snack

Dissolve honey and salt in water to make a brine.

Pour brine over fish.

Swedish-Gravlax-Fermented-Salmon-Wild-Caught-Salmon-What-To-Do-With-Salmon-GAPS-Legal-Salmon-Recipe-GAPS-Diet-Salmon-Fish-On-GAPS-GAPS-Diet-Snack

Leave at room temperature for 1 - 1 ½ hours.

Pour the water out.

Serve on lettuce or eat alone.

Store in refrigerator and consume within two days.


Swedish Gravlax Recipe

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ lb Fresh Wild Caught Salmon
  • Fresh Dill
  • Freshly Coarsely Ground Black Pepper
  • 4 cup Room Temperature Filtered Water
  • 1 tbsp Honey
  • 1 ½ tbsp Salt

instructions:

How to cook Swedish Gravlax Recipe

  1. Thinly slice the fish.
  2. Place fish slices into a deep tray.
  3. Sprinkle with dill sprigs and pepper.
  4. Dissolve honey and salt in water to make a brine.
  5. Pour brine over fish.
  6. Leave at room temperature for 1 - 1 ½ hours.
  7. Pour the water out.
  8. Serve on lettuce or eat alone.
  9. Store in refrigerator and consume within two days.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Liver Pâté Recipe

Liver pâté makes me feel like I am eating a treat when I'm really eating something healthy—very healthy and good for me! You can make pate out of any type of liver, but chicken liver is the most mild, so that is a great one to start with if you are not used to eating liver. Once you make this delicious mixture, you can eat it many ways. Honestly, I mostly just eat it by the spoonful, but there are many other ways you can eat pate, including the ones listed below. After you make this wonderful superfood, let us know in the comments your favorite ways to spice and eat pate.

Ways to Eat liver Pate:

  • It’s good on it’s own

  • Spread it on crackers or bread if you are not following the GAPS diet

  • Create GAPS Legal “crackers” with slices of avocado or zucchini

  • Layer with fermented veggies like cabbage or sauerkraut

  • Spread on pieces of cheese

  • Dip veggies such as carrot sticks,

  • Add the pate to lean meats like chicken or turkey or game meat like venison or turkey to give it a boost of fat

GAPS Legal Liver Pate Ingredients

  • ½ c Liver

  • Butter or lard

  • 2 tbsp chopped Onion

  • 3 cloves of Garlic

  • Spices

    • 1/16 tsp nutmeg, cloves and ginger

    • ¼ tsp of cinnamon

    • ¼ to ½ tsp Salt

  • 2 small pans

  • Blender or Food Processor

Directions for making liver pate for the gaps diet

liver-pate-how-to-make-liver-pate-eating-pate-on-the-gaps-diet-organ-meat-on-gaps-liver-pate-recipe-for-gaps-protocol-loveland-colorado-health-clinic

Roughly chop about 2 tbsp of an onion. The smaller you chop your onion, the quicker it will cook but careful - too small and it’s easy to burn!

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Add about ½ inch of water to a pan. Add liver to pan to poach.

After 2-3 minutes, flip the liver to poach the other side.

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Add butter or lard to a small skillet.  Add the onions to the skillet, stir. Add the garlic to the skillet.

The liver is done when it is still a little pink inside but not red. A little blood coming out of the liver when it’s done. If the juices are all clear, the liver is overcooked.

Add liver to the food processor or blender. Process quickly on its own.

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Add cooked onions and garlic to food processor or blender. Add enough fat so that the ratio is about 40% fat, 60% liver, about 3 tbsp for ½ cup of liver. Lard has less of a flavor than butter, butter will give your pate a different flavor.

Blend until smooth.

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Add spices and ¼ tsp salt to the blender or food processor. Blend until smooth. If needed, add remaining ½ tsp of salt.

Serve pate warm or chilled.


Liver Pate

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • ½ c Liver
  • Butter or lard
  • 2 tbsp chopped Onion
  • 3 cloves of Garlic
  • Spices
  • 1/16 tsp nutmeg, cloves and ginger
  • ¼ tsp of cinnamon
  • ¼ to ½ tsp Salt
  • 2 small pans
  • Blender or Food Processor

instructions:

How to cook Liver Pate

  1. Roughly chop about 2 tbsp of an onion. The smaller you chop your onion, the quicker it will cook but careful - too small and it’s easy to burn!
  2. Add about ½ inch of water to a pan. Add liver to pan to poach.
  3. After 2-3 minutes, flip the liver to poach the other side.
  4. Add butter or lard to a small skillet. Add the onions to the skillet, stir. Add the garlic to the skillet.
  5. The liver is done when it is still a little pink inside but not red. A little blood coming out of the liver when it’s done. If the juices are all clear, the liver is overcooked.
  6. Add liver to the food processor or blender. Process quickly on its own.
  7. Add cooked onions and garlic to food processor or blender. Add enough fat so that the ratio is about 40% fat, 60% liver, about 3 tbsp for ½ cup of liver. Lard has less of a flavor than butter, butter will give your pate a different flavor.
  8. Blend until smooth.
  9. Add spices and ¼ tsp salt to the blender or food processor. Blend until smooth. If needed, add remaining ½ tsp of salt.
  10. Serve pate warm or chilled.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Lovely Lard

Eating animal fat is important to our body's health. But eating enough fat can be challenging, especially when there is a dairy allergy. Lard is a great alternative to butter, and its taste is more mild than that of tallow. You can buy lard at the store, but it is expensive and may be hydrogenated or of poor quality. Making your own lard is simple and easy, and can be done for a fraction of the price. To make lard, you first start out with pig fat. This can be obtained from a butcher, or even trimmed off of fatty cuts of pork like the Boston butt. The process of turning fat into lard or tallow is called rendering. In this post I describe rendering lard, but the process for rendering tallow (which is fat from beef, bison, deer, lamb, or elk) is the same, although for tallow it may take a few more hours.   There are two kinds of pig fat. Leaf fat is from fat surrounding the internal organs. It is very mild in taste and used to be reserved for making pies and pastries. Body fat is from the layer of fat beneath the skin. This has a slightly stronger pork taste, and is better used in cooking meat and vegetables. Along with a different taste, there is a different look to the two types of fat. Body fat is in large pieces, and appears more dense and flat. Leaf fat is in smaller pieces, has a fluffier texture, and may contain membranes. The fat you get from a butcher may contain both types of fat. If that is the case, I recommend separating out the two types of fat and rendering them separately so you can use them for different purposes. However, there is no problem in mixing them and rendering them together. (The fat I have pictured below is leaf fat.)  

Making Lard:

First, cut up the pig fat into small 1-2 inch sized cubes. If using leaf fat, remove as much membrane as possible.

Put the fat cubes in a medium saucepan on low heat. You may use a crockpot, but it must have a very low setting or the fat will burn. Stir occasionally and watch closely. Don't let the lard smoke!

With time, the solid pieces of fat will get smaller, and the liquid will increase.

After a few hours, when the lard is liquified, set up your strainer and cloth.

Below you see pictured a jar, jar funnel, and metal strainer. Metal is best because the lard is hot! To finish it off, place a cloth. You can use an old napkin or other cloth, or several layers of cheesecloth.

Pour the liquid into the strainer. The liquid will go into the jar and the cracklings will stay in the cloth.

Squeeze the rest of the liquid out of the cracklings.

Cracklings separated from the liquid lard. Salt and fry these. You can eat them like bacon bits, or just plain.

Allow the jar of lard to cool on the counter.

When the lard is cool you can move it to the fridge, or leave it on the counter.

If you are careful not to contaminate the jar, the lard will last for several months, even left out at room temperature. Use the lard in your cooking— it is a wonderful thing to fry up vegetables or meat and add fat to your diet. Bon appétit!

Onward!


How to Make Lard

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

instructions:

How to cook How to Make Lard

  1. First, cut up the pig fat into small 1-2 inch sized cubes. If using leaf fat, remove as much membrane as possible.
  2. Put the fat cubes in a medium saucepan on low heat. You may use a crockpot, but it must have a very low setting or the fat will burn. Stir occasionally and watch closely. Don't let the lard smoke!
  3. With time, the solid pieces of fat will get smaller, and the liquid will increase.
  4. After a few hours, when the lard is liquified, set up your strainer and cloth.
  5. Below you see pictured a jar, jar funnel, and metal strainer. Metal is best because the lard is hot! To finish it off, place a cloth. You can use an old napkin or other cloth, or several layers of cheesecloth.
  6. Pour the liquid into the strainer. The liquid will go into the jar and the cracklings will stay in the cloth.
  7. Squeeze the rest of the liquid out of the cracklings.
  8. Cracklings separated from the liquid lard. Salt and fry these. You can eat them like bacon bits, or just plain.
  9. Allow the jar of lard to cool on the counter.
  10. When the lard is cool you can move it to the fridge, or leave it on the counter.
  11. If you are careful not to contaminate the jar, the lard will last for several months, even left out at room temperature. Use the lard in your cooking— it is a wonderful thing to fry up vegetables or meat and add fat to your diet. Bon appétit!
Created using The Recipes Generator

Making the Vegetable Medley

One of the most important ferments in the GAPS™ diet is the vegetablemedley. You can find this recipe in Dr. Natasha Cambell-McBride's book, Gut and Psychology Syndrome. Her recipe is for a bowl ferment, but you can also make it in a jar, which is how I prefer to make it. And this is the recipe we are going to do today! This recipe contains five different vegetables: beets (good for liver and blood cleansing), cabbage (stimulates digestion), carrots (contain vitamin A), and cauliflower (makes it taste better, believe me), and garlic (good for immune support). It makes a very rich and flavorful liquid, which is also a wonderful probiotic drink.

No matter how delicious this is, and how much you like it, drink only a little bit in the beginning to avoid die-off. Respect the ferments, man!

Gather your ingredients and supplies

  • Glass jar, 1/2 gallon

  • Sea salt, 3-4 TBS

  • Medium beet

  • Carrots (3)

  • Cauliflower

  • Cabbage

  • Garlic (5-7 cloves), fresh or fermented

Instructions

To a clean half-gallon jar, add about 1/2 cup of each vegetable.You can add them in any order you like. The main purpose of the vegetable medley is to drink the liquid, so make sure the ingredients you add only fill the jar half way (or a little more). This will create enough liquid to make it worth it!

Add the beets

And carrots

And so on...

Last of all, garlic and salt

When all the ingredients are in the jar, it should be less than 3/4 full. Add filtered water, to the shoulder of the jar. Finally, add a cabbage leaf or two to hold all the ingredients under the water. I add a pinch of salt after the cabbage leaves are in place to discourage bad bacterial growth. All that's left is to tightly screw on the lid and leave it on the counter.

After 7 days, move the jar to the fridge and consume the liquid until it's gone, and eat the vegetable pieces. This can be a perpetual ferment. To do this, daily drink what you need, then replace that amount with filtered water, and continue to leave it out on the counter. Keep up with this process until the vegetables are spent (they turn grey and tasteless).

Before

[Pictures missing in transfer*]

One week later

That's it! You have successfully made the veggie medley! Once you get the basics down, you can experiment with different vegetable combinations (eg. broccoli instead of cauliflower). Let us know your favorite combinations!

Onward!


Vegetable Medley

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • Glass jar, 1/2 gallon
  • Sea salt, 3-4 TBS
  • Medium beet
  • Carrots (3)
  • Cauliflower
  • Cabbage
  • Garlic (5-7 cloves), fresh or fermented

instructions:

How to cook Vegetable Medley

  1. To a clean half-gallon jar, add about 1/2 cup of each vegetable.You can add them in any order you like. The main purpose of the vegetable medley is to drink the liquid, so make sure the ingredients you add only fill the jar half way (or a little more). This will create enough liquid to make it worth it!
  2. Add the beets
  3. And carrots
  4. And so on...
  5. Last of all, garlic and salt
  6. When all the ingredients are in the jar, it should be less than 3/4 full. Add filtered water, to the shoulder of the jar. Finally, add a cabbage leaf or two to hold all the ingredients under the water. I add a pinch of salt after the cabbage leaves are in place to discourage bad bacterial growth. All that's left is to tightly screw on the lid and leave it on the counter.
  7. After 7 days, move the jar to the fridge and consume the liquid until it's gone, and eat the vegetable pieces. This can be a perpetual ferment. To do this, daily drink what you need, then replace that amount with filtered water, and continue to leave it out on the counter. Keep up with this process until the vegetables are spent (they turn grey and tasteless).
  8. That's it! You have successfully made the veggie medley! Once you get the basics down, you can experiment with different vegetable combinations (eg. broccoli instead of cauliflower). 
Created using The Recipes Generator

GAPS Milkshake

Our recipe this week is a simple, but powerful one! It is called the GAPS™ milkshake, and it packs a powerful punch! This delicious, satisfying and helpful beverage is a wonderful way to daily consume your freshly-pressed juices, and can even be a meal.

The GAPS™ milkshake is mix of juice, protein, and fat. Because it is easily digested, usually in about 20 minutes, it can be eaten when you don't have much time to sit and digest. But because it contains fat and protein, as well as sugar, it can sustain you for a while, often a few hours.

Let's get down to making it! You need a few simple ingredients.

  1. Freshly pressed juices (I like carrots, but you can use any juice mixture)

  2. Sour cream (creme fraische), coconut oil, or another fat

  3. Raw egg (whole or just the yoke)

  4. Raw honey (optional, and only a little!)

Juice the carrot (and/or other vegetables and fruits). I use organic vegetables so I just rinse them off (sometimes). You can see my (not) high-end juicer in the picture! But it works! Don't feel like you have to spend hundreds of dollars to juice (this one was about $40). It is a centrifuge juicer, and I try to consume the juices within 15 minutes to get the most enzyme activity, but again, it works! Successful GAPS is not about perfection, it is about action!

Once you have your juice in a glass, you are ready to add your other ingredients. Add 1-2 raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs. If you do add the white, I recommend using a spring whisk or a blender to break up the white--that is a hard texture to get down! With raw eggs, it is also important to know the source of your eggs (were the chickens healthy) and try not to touch the shell with the egg. If there happens to be any salmonella present, it is likely still on the outside of the egg, not the inside. Of course, there is no guarantee, especially if the eggs are washed (this breaks down the protective layer around the egg), so consume at your own risk! But I have yet to get sick, even using store bought eggs sometimes.

Add the sour cream (a good-sized dollop). The sour cream is there primarily to slow the absorption of sugar from the juice—add to taste. You can also add coconut oil if you are not tolerating dairy (technically this makes it a GAPS Smoothie) Stir, whisk or blend together.

You can add a little honey if you need to. It is better to add some fruit to your juice ingredients instead of honey, but that isn't always an option, especially on early stages. I have found that the egg whites are a little bitter, and when I add a whole egg instead of just the yolk, I often need a little honey to help it go down. That's it! All that's left is to enjoy it!

And it's gone!

As I said, this is a great "meal" for those on-the-go mornings. Especially if you are hungry early in the morning, this is a great thing to drink, as it is not a burden to the digestive system. The juices support your body's cleansing processes, which are often happening from 4am-10am every day. You could also add beet kvass to this beverage as an extra liver cleanser. It can overwhelm the flavor, so I prefer to drink mine separately. Experiment with your preferences, and with the recipe! Let us know how you like it best!

Onward!

GAPS Milkshake

GAPSmilkshake-150x150.jpg
  • Freshly Pressed Juices

  • Sour cream, creme faiche, coconut oil, or another fat

  • Raw Egg ((whole or just the yoke))

  • Raw Honey ((optional and only a little))

  1. Juice the carrot (and/or other vegetables and fruits).

  2. Add 1-2 raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs. If you do add the white, I recommend using a spring whisk or a blender to break up the white–that is a hard texture to get down!

  3. Add the sour cream to taste. The sour cream is there primarily to slow the absorption of sugar from the juice.

  4. Stir, whisk or blend together.

  5. Add a little honey if you need to

With raw eggs, it is also important to know the source of your eggs (were the chickens healthy) and try not to touch the shell with the egg. If there happens to be any salmonella present, it is likely still on the outside of the egg, not the inside. Of course, there is no guarantee, especially if the eggs are washed (this breaks down the protective layer around the egg), so consume at your own risk! 

I have found that the egg whites are a little bitter, and when I add a whole egg instead of just the yolk, I often need a little honey to help it go down.


GAPS Milkshake

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • Freshly Pressed Juices
  • Sour cream, creme faiche, coconut oil, or another fat
  • Raw Egg ((whole or just the yoke))
  • Raw Honey ((optional and only a little))

instructions:

How to cook GAPS Milkshake

  1. Juice the carrot (and/or other vegetables and fruits).
  2. Add 1-2 raw egg yolks or whole raw eggs. If you do add the white, I recommend using a spring whisk or a blender to break up the white–that is a hard texture to get down!
  3. Add the sour cream to taste. The sour cream is there primarily to slow the absorption of sugar from the juice.
  4. Stir, whisk or blend together.
  5. Add a little honey if you need to

NOTES:

With raw eggs, it is also important to know the source of your eggs (were the chickens healthy) and try not to touch the shell with the egg. If there happens to be any salmonella present, it is likely still on the outside of the egg, not the inside. Of course, there is no guarantee, especially if the eggs are washed (this breaks down the protective layer around the egg), so consume at your own risk! I have found that the egg whites are a little bitter, and when I add a whole egg instead of just the yolk, I often need a little honey to help it go down.
Created using The Recipes Generator

Beet Kvass

Beet Kvass is a liver tonic. Anyone can make this simple fermented drink! It requires only a few ingredients, and only a few minutes to "put up."

Want to learn how? Good!

But first, some definitions:

  • Kvass: beverage

  • "Put up" a ferment: combine ingredients and set it aside to let it ferment

  • Sea Salt: unrefined salt, salt that is the same way it was found in nature

    • contains many trace minerals, depending on which type it is

    • Celtic Sea Salt, Real Salt, Himalayan Salt, others

    • most fermenting enthusiasts prefer Himalayan for fermenting (it's a taste thing)

  • Shoulder of the jar: the area of a jar where the jar narrows to become the mouth

  • Whey: the slightly yellow, watery stuff that is on the top of yogurt or sour cream

    • you can get your own whey by straining yogurt through an old cotton napkin, or several layers of cheese-cloth

Ingredients & Supplies to make beet kvass

  • 1/2 gallon glass mason jar

  • 1 medium-large beet

  • 2-4 TBS sea salt

  • cold, filtered water

  • 4 TBS whey (optional)

Directions to Make Your Own Beet Kvass

Cut the beet into 1-2 inch cubes. Do not cut too small or shred the beet! Too much surface area and the beets will ferment too fast and create alcohol!

You do not need to peel the beets, just wash fairly well and cut off the top. A little organic dirt will add minerals and soil bacterium.

Place the cut beet in the mason jar. The beets should fill the jar about 1/4-1/3 of the way

Add salt to the jar. 4 TBS is the traditional amount if no whey added, see tips below

Add optional whey. If whey is used, you can decrease the salt by half.

Fill the jar up to the shoulder with cold, filtered water.

Seal the jar with a metal lid and ring, closing tightly.

Gently tip and swirl the jar to help the salt dissolve.

Set on the counter for 3-5 days, until the kvass is a rich purple color.

Move to the fridge (the beets stay in the liquid)

Consume daily!

You can use the beets for two batches

  • when the liquid is almost gone (about a pint left) then refill with water and salt

  • set on the counter for another 3-5 days

  • when the liquid is gone the second time, discard the beets and start fresh

Tips and Tricks for beet kvass

  • My beets are floating!

    • It's okay if the beets are floating-they often do, but will eventually sink. You don't need a weight for this ferment.

  • How much salt?????

    • The amount of salt largely depends on you--your taste, and your climate.

    • The salt is there to inhibit bad bacteria growth until the good bacteria are strong enough.

    • Beet kvass doesn't seem to go bad often, especially in the dry climate of Colorado.

    • I use about 3 TBS salt and no whey, with no problem. No whey! Ha ha ha, get it?

    • People like their kvass with more or less salt, so see how it tastes best to you.

  • I have a white film on the top and/or the bottom of my kvass.

    • DON'T start over!

    • This is merely the hard working lactobacillus bacterium thriving!

    • You can shake or stir in the white film, or skim it off, if you prefer.

  • I have blue or black, or another color of mold!

    • This is NOT okay. If you find this, throw it out and start over!

  • How much do I take each day?

    • It is generally recommended that you take up to 4 ounces 2x/day.

    • As with all ferments, it is important to START SLOW and increase gradually.

    • It's best to take this on an empty stomach, like first thing in the morning.

Love beets?!?!?!?

Can't get enough of them?!?!?

Learn about other great ways to eat beets here!

Happy fermenting!

Onward!


Beet Kvass

Author:
prep time: cook time: total time:

ingredients:

  • 1/2 gallon glass mason jar
  • 1 medium-large beet
  • 2-4 TBS sea salt
  • cold, filtered water
  • 4 TBS whey (optional)

instructions:

How to cook Beet Kvass

  1. Cut the beet into 1-2 inch cubes. Do not cut too small or shred the beet! Too much surface area and the beets will ferment too fast and create alcohol!
  2. You do not need to peel the beets, just wash fairly well and cut off the top. A little organic dirt will add minerals and soil bacterium.
  3. Place the cut beet in the mason jar. The beets should fill the jar about 1/4-1/3 of the way
  4. Add salt to the jar. 4 TBS is the traditional amount if no whey added, see tips below
  5. Add optional whey. If whey is used, you can decrease the salt by half.
  6. Fill the jar up to the shoulder with cold, filtered water.
  7. Seal the jar with a metal lid and ring, closing tightly.
  8. Gently tip and swirl the jar to help the salt dissolve.
  9. Set on the counter for 3-5 days, until the kvass is a rich purple color.
  10. Move to the fridge (the beets stay in the liquid)
  11. Consume daily!
  12. You can use the beets for two batches: when the liquid is almost gone (about a pint left) then refill with water and salt, set on the counter for another 3-5 day. When the liquid is gone the second time, discard the beets and start fresh.
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