Gluten Free GAPS Legal Onion Rings

As I’ve been healing and able to eat a larger variety of food, my taste buds have been seeking new and exciting tastes and I’ve found myself wanting to experiment more with cooking. These onion rings are my first foray into creating GAPS Legal fried foods.

My curiosity in figuring out if I could create fried food that was GAPS Legal was spurred by my new favorite YouTube channel, 18th Century Cooking by John Townsend. This sent my mind spinning on if I could create GAPS legal fried foods.

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These onion rings are legal on the GAPS Diet at stage 4! You can reserve the fat you use for frying to use again, as long as you don’t burn your fat.

Feel free to add additional flavors to the batter as you’d like!

Ingredients for Onion Rings:

  • Onions

  • 1 cup Fermented Almond Flour (see recipe)

  • 3 Eggs

  • 1 pint Lard (see recipe or store bought Fat Works)

  • 1 tsp Salt

  • Pepper


Directions for Onion Rings:

Heat lard in a pan on low heat. Be mindful of your fat because if it heats too fast, it will burn and you will have to throw it out and start over.

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Scramble three eggs in a shallow bowl with salt and pepper. Add in almond flour.

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Slice onion into thick rounds. Separate them into individual layers.

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Working directly next to the pan with lard, dunk your onion rounds piece by piece in the batter. Then place directly into the lard.

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Cook, turning as needed until they are golden brown in color.

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Remove onions when they are golden brown. Drain off excess oil or the onion rings will get mushy.

If the onion rings are not salty enough, salt them to taste.

Enjoy!


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How to Make Your Own Spaghetti Sauce

I’ve always liked spaghetti and spaghetti sauce but when I started making my own spaghetti sauce, I realized I liked my own sauce best of all! I love making my own spaghetti sauce because I get to be in charge of the flavor, texture, and strength. Plus, I know everything that’s in it! I did try making my own tomato paste once but it was way too much work! I’m glad to have other options for tomato paste and sauce.

If you want a really smooth sauce, I recommend using tomato paste. If you don’t mind it with a little texture or you have an immersion blender, you can make it with crushed tomatoes. Using crushed tomatoes to make your sauce is preferable because there is less processing involved. Whole, raw tomatoes can also be used. Simply cut them into chunks, put them into a pot with water, and simmer slightly. You can remove the seeds but if you don’t mind them, that’s one less step and less work!

After the tomatoes have cooked for a period of time and are soft, you can puree them with an immersion blender or stand blender. After the tomatoes are pureed, simmer on low heat and begin adding your spices.

I also love tomato sauce because as long as you are tolerating tomatoes, you can eat this on the introduction diet of GAPS, as early as stage four. If you are on the introduction diet, make sure you are adding fresh herbs. When using fresh herbs, you will need to use larger amounts and plan to simmer your sauce for a longer period of time. A long simmer simply makes your sauce more delicious.

For a quicker spaghetti sauce, use crushed glass can tomatoes, like the ones pictured below. Begin cooking them and, when warm and soft, immersion blend them or add them to a stand blender. If you want the sauce less chunky, you can blend before you add your herbs and spices.

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If using tomato puree or tomato paste, you will need to reconstitute it with water. A small amount of paste can go a long way! Start with adding equal parts water and paste. Continue adding water if needed until you get to your desired consistency. Make sure you do not use tin canned paste, especially if it’s lined with plastic coating. I recommend only using glass canned items from a company you know and trust.

If you have any fermented garlic, add a tablespoon or so of the liquid at the very end of your cooking. This will send your sauce over the top.

Traditional spaghetti sauce recipes have sugar in them. If you are transitioning your family from a sugary diet, you could consider adding a little bit of honey into the mixture. However, it is best to not add a sweetener if you can avoid it.

This spaghetti sauce recipe can be used for a lovely spaghetti night, or you can use it to make zucchini pizzas!

Once you have your tomato base, read below to find out how to finish your sauce.

Ingredients to Make Your Own Tomato Sauce

  • 18 oz. crushed tomatoes

  • 2 Bay Leaves

  • 1 tbsp lard

  • ⅓ cup minced onion

  • 3-5 cloves of garlic

  • 2 tsp Dried Oregano

  • 1 tsp Dried Sage

  • 2 tsp Dried Thyme

  • 1 tsp Salt

Directions to Make Your Own Spaghetti Sauce

This recipe uses crushed tomatoes. You can also use tomato paste or whole tomatoes. (See above for directions on using tomato paste or whole tomatoes to make your sauce.)

Add one 18 oz. of crushed tomatoes into a pot. Add a bit of water to the jar, swirl, and add to the pot. Immersion blend the tomatoes at this stage if you like texture in your sauce.

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Add two whole bay leaves into tomatoes on the sauce.

Warm your lard in a cast iron skillet. Finely chop your onions and garlic. Add onions to your skillet first. Mince your garlic. Add garlic.

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When onions and garlic are softened, add them in with the tomatoes. If you would like a completely smooth sauce, you can immersion blend the sauce at this stage.

Add your dried herbs into the mixture and stir together.

Add water as you need it if your sauce is too thick. As it simmers it will reduce so to start, you want a soupy consistency for better mixing. If you add too much water at any point, you’ll simply need to simmer your sauce longer.

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Simmer for at least twenty minutes. The longer you simmer your sauce, the better it will be.

Store any leftover sauce in the jar that your tomatoes came in. I leave the bay leaves in so the sauce continues to be flavored. It will keep for about a week in the fridge.

Use your spaghetti sauce to top roasted spaghetti squash or to make zucchini pizza bites!

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Roasted Spaghetti Squash for Spaghetti Night

Roasted spaghetti squash has long been a favorite of mine, even before I started the GAPS Diet. Spaghetti squash is unique to others in the squash family because of its texture. It’s meaty insides look more like long strands of spaghetti and it has a less pureed texture than acorn squash or zucchini. This makes spaghetti squash  a great pasta alternative and so easy to prepare. All you need to do is cut it open, clean it out, slice it and forget it.

Spaghetti squash is GAPS Legal! You can add it to your soups on the first stage of GAPS. If you are on Stage Four of the GAPS Diet, you can eat it fried or baked.

You can use the spaghetti squash as a spaghetti alternative for white or red sauce. I also like to refry it and warm the spaghetti squash up in butter with lots of sauce (this is a great comfort food to support my body when it’s stressed.)

Ingredients for Roasted Spaghetti Squash

  • Spaghetti Squash

Directions for Roasted Spaghetti Squash

Preheat oven to 400.

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Slice spaghetti squash in half lengthwise.

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Remove seeds and strings in center. You can compost the seeds but you might get lots of volunteer spaghetti squash seedlings. (Which is not necessarily a bad thing.)

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Roast in the oven for 35 minutes to an hour. It depends on the size of your squash. I like my squash to be very soft and well cooked. This is also important for the GAPS Diet to have well cooked vegetables.

Check your squash after 35 minutes to see if they are softened and squishy. They should not be mush, but should feel much softer.

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When they are soft, remove them from the oven. If you need your squash to cool faster, you can flip them over. I prefer to keep them with the middle side down so they continue while they cool.

Check your spaghetti squash with a fork to see if it is done. If not, cook for a while longer.

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Once the spaghetti squash is cooked, remove the insides of the squash by scraping a fork along the insides.


How to Make the Perfect Hard Boiled and Soft Boiled Eggs

Egg whites are best eaten cooked. They are very detoxifying when they’re raw and when they’re raw, they require a lot of things to properly digest them. All the necessary things needed for digestion are in egg yolks so it’s important to consume the egg whites and egg yolks at the same time. Egg yolks are best eaten raw or very lightly cooked. This keeps the fragile nutrients inside egg yolks intact.

If you are having digestive issues, you should eat egg whites cooked only. After you have healed, you can consume raw egg whites.*

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Dr. Natasha recommends that a child eats between three and six egg yolks a day and an adult should eat six to twelve. You may consume the whites with this if you are tolerating them or simply use the yolk only.

There are multiple recipes for using egg whites only or you can feed them to your dog or cat.

*Eating uncooked or raw eggs or feeding raw eggs to your pets can pose a risk to your health.

Keeping hard boiled eggs on hand is a great and easy protein on the go! If you want to take your hard boiled eggs one step further, check out my recipe on making mayo free deviled eggs.

Directions for Hard Boiled Eggs

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Fill a medium saucepan with cold water.

Add eggs.

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Bring eggs to a boil and cook for 5-6 minutes covered.

Remove eggs from heat.

Let set for 5 minutes.

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Test if your egg is hard boiled by removing one from the pan and spinning it. A hard boiled egg will spin upright if the yolk is hard.

Rinse the eggs under cold water or place them in an ice bath.

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Tap the end of the egg and peel the shell off. Enjoy! Try these Mayo Free Deviled Eggs 2 Ways with your Hard Boiled Eggs.


I love soft boiled eggs! It makes me feel like royalty whenever I eat them. The best part of this fancy seeming dish is it’s actually very simple to make!

Directions for Soft Boiled Eggs

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Add filtered water to a pot. Bring water to a boil.

Once water is boiling, add eggs.

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Boil for 5 to 6 minutes.

Rinse under cold water or add to an ice bath.

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Tap one end of the egg and peel half of the egg. Scoop out the inside and enjoy!

How to Make Sauerkraut - DIY Sauerkraut

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. Vitamin C is anti-inflammatory and immune boosting.

While good quality sauerkraut can be obtained in most stores now, I still prefer to make my own as I think it tastes the best. I put a lot of love and anticipation into my sauerkraut, as I don’t eat it until it has been fermenting for at least three months.

Making your own sauerkraut is very cost effective if you are eating on a budget. Not only are you making it for pennies, fermenting vegetables increases the bioavailability of nutrients, making this a ‘food hack.’

I used to cut my cabbage in a food processor but I feel that all time considered, including clean up time, it’s actually faster to cut it yourself. Plus, I like touching the cabbage myself instead of letting a machine cut it.

Sauerkraut works anaerobically, meaning it does not require oxygen. Any vegetable that is above the level of the water can grow mold or undesirable bacteria strains.

I do my sauerkraut in one quart jars because I prefer to open a smaller amount at a time. You can use any size jar that you want. An open jar in the fridge will keep for six months to a year. If kept at cooler temperatures, unopened, like in a root cellar or in the fridge, sauerkraut will keep for two or more years.

You can add whey to your cabbage to make the sauerkraut. Not using whey is called wild fermentation. It allows for different bacteria to grow than using a dairy based whey. I prefer to make my sauerkraut without whey.

With all ferments, variety is key. Using both whey and simply salt to make your ferments provides good variety in your diet.

Ingredients for Making Your Own Sauerkraut:

  • 1 Medium Cabbage

  • 2 tbsp Salt

  • Filtered Water

Directions for Making Your Own Sauerkraut:

Remove and rinse outside leaves and reserve them for the tops of your jars to keep the vegetables from coming up the level of the water.

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Slice cabbage into slivers. As you slice it, keep turning it to keep yourself safe and keep your cabbage evenly sized.

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Add a little bit of salt and massage with your hands for a few minutes. The salt starts breaking down the cell walls of the cabbage, which will save you from having to beat the cabbage a lot.

After you have massaged your cabbage, let it sit for 10 - 15 minutes.

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Knead your cabbage again.

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Once you have kneaded your cabbage to the desire texture, fill your jars. It’s best to continue kneading until you can squeeze a little bit of water from the cabbage.

Fermenting cabbage produces a decent amount of gas, Make sure to leave head room in your jars to accommodate. This means lightly packing cabbage into your jar, about ¾ full.

Add water to just under the shoulder of the jar.

Sometimes cabbage produces enough liquid while it's fermenting. If it doesn’t feel free to add more liquid.

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Top your sauerkraut off with a whole cabbage leaf, packing it along the sides of the jar to keep all the vegetables below the level of the liquid.

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Seal with a two piece lid.

Leave on your counter. No need to burp this ferment! This process works anaerobically, without oxygen. If your jars burp, overflow or explode, you simply packed your jar too tight with vegetables.

Northern Colorado GAPS Group Meeting Recap May 21, 2019

Each week, we gather in Northern Colorado for a meetup centered around the GAPS Diet, started by Dr. Natasha Campbell. During these meetups, we have a lesson about a fundamental aspect of the GAPS Diet, exchange recipes and ideas, support each other through the GAPS Diet, and learn something new from a holistic healthcare speaker or presenter.

The first GAPS Group meeting that you attend is FREE.

If you find the information helpful, individual classes are $15 to attend, or you can buy a punch card for five classes that brings down the cost to $10 per class (recommended). We'll have punch cards for sale when you arrive at Tuesday's meeting.

If you can't make it in-person, we're happy to send you a link for you to watch us LIVE. Send an email to Office@bewellclinic.net to request the link to the broadcast! Costs will still apply to virtual attendance, so we recommend that you come join us to receive all of the benefits of the meeting.

GAPS Group Meeting May 21st, 2019

This week was a recipe presentation on sauerkraut!

This week, the Be Well Clinic’s own Lauren Isenhour did a recipe demonstration on how to make sauerkraut. You can find the directions on how to make your own saurkraut here.

Sauerkraut is a GAPS staple and a delicious ferment to keep in the house. It’s also extremely easy to make! These food demonstrations are a great reason to come to the GAPS Group Meeting because they are supplemental to the blog post recipes. It’s a great way to learn a new way to cook or think about food and it can be helpful to see how to make something first hand. The most important part of this recipe is to note the change in the texture of the cabbage as the salt does it’s job to break down the cell walls of the cabbage. This change is noticeable in a short period of time as you can see by the photos below!

Amy also presented on supplements and how to correctly supplement your food as your body needs it. Amy shared on the benefits of supplements like fermented cod liver oil, iodine, ox bile, and probiotics (which sauerkraut is a great source off!) She also shared about the die-off reaction that happens as we change our health and how to recognize and manage those symptoms.

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JOIN US AT OUR NEXT GAPS GROUP MEETING!

Next week's GAPS Group Meeting is the start of a new Getting Started on GAPS Session! Come meet the members of Be Well Clinic's GAPS Group and share your stories.

Our lesson is on Intro GAPS. Amy will share how the stages work and how to nourish the body and heal the gut. We'll talk about how and why all diseases begin in the gut and how you can change your health by healing your gut.

If you feel like you're well-versed on the practical applications of GAPS, you're welcome to skip this part of the meeting and join us at 7:00 PM for our recipe sharing and discussion. This week's we're talking about vegetable ferments!

The Recipe Sharing and Discussion is one of the best things about GAPS Group! You get to try delicious food, and take home the recipe so you can recreate it! It's a great way to diversify your GAPS go-tos, and you get to catch up with everyone on their progress. Sometimes, hearing someone else's success story is the best way to get you to keep going.

Location:
GAPS Group is currently held at the Loveland Outlets, very close to our new office space. It’s located north of McWhinney Blvd. next to The Studio, near Tommy Hilfiger and Sketchers. The best way to get there is to set your GPS to 5613 McWhinney Blvd, Loveland, CO 80538 and walk to suite 5609. Get more details on the exact location here.

See more information and RSVP to the event on our Facebook page.

Eggs Poached in Stock

Eggs poached in stock  was a new food for me when I started the GAPS Diet. It quickly became one of my favorite breakfasts that I am still enjoying. Sometimes, I poach an entire egg in the stock but I often I simply poach the yolks in stock.

Poaching your eggs in stock is great on cold winter’s days. It really helps you get going and warms you right off! It’s also a great way to get in your stock for the day in the summer, as it’s often cool enough in the mornings still to enjoy a warm beverage.

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I’ve always liked over easy eggs so I enjoy runny yolks. If you don’t like runny yolks, you can poach your eggs longer, or if you are poaching in your mug, you can break the yolk in the mug. The warmth of the soup will help to cook the yolk but very gently, which will help to leave much of the beneficial enzymes of the yolks intact.

Egg whites are best consumed cooked and egg yolks are best consumed raw. This is for ease of digestion as well as full nutrient potential.

You can use any stock of your choice to poach your eggs in. I had chicken stock on hand when making this recipe so I used that! Be sure to salt your eggs in the stock generously while cooking them and after.

Ingredients to Make Eggs Poached in Stock

  • 2 cups of Your Choice of Stock

  • 1-2 Eggs

  • Salt and pepper

Directions for Eggs Poached in Stock:

Bring two cups of stock to a boil. Add a generous shake of salt.

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Once stock is rapidly boiling, use a spoon to create a swirling vortex.

To the vortex, break in one to two eggs.

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Move them gently off the bottom, where they will settle.

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When your yolk gets to your desired firmness, remove the egg or pour the entire thing into a bowl or mug. This takes anywhere between 3 to 5 minutes.


GAPS Diet Stage 1 Modification: If you are on Stage 1 of the GAPS Diet, this modification will make this recipe legal.

Bring a mug’s worth of stock to a boil.

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Once the stock is boiling, add it to a mug.

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To the mug, add one to three egg yolks.

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I like to let them warm for a couple minutes. Then, I pop one entire egg yolk into my mouth, whole.  Others prefer to break the egg in the mug and stir it around. This only lightly cooks the egg yolk.

How to Make the Best Omelette

I have fond memories of omelettes!  I lived in Guatemala doing mission work for four months when I was 18. During my time there, we took a trip and stayed at a nice hotel. We had a gourmet breakfast with omelettes, complete with the freshest vegetables and fresh eggs. The skill of the chefs was amazing to watch.  It was some of the best food I had ever eaten! Whenever I make omelettes at home now, I think fondly back on that memory. Making an omelette in a cast iron pan is very different from what I experienced in that restaurant but it’s still a delicious and filling meal any time of the day.

You can use the suggested vegetables or any that you have on hand. Making an omelette in the morning is a great way to use up any vegetables that you have leftover from dinner the night before. In general, eggs, peppers, tomatoes, and spinach make great omelettes.

You can also had ham, bacon, or pieces of chicken into your omelette if you’d like. I prefer the simplicity of just vegetables in mine. Cheese is another great ingredient to add to an omelette. If you are cooking in a cast iron pan, which I recommend, wait to add your cheese until your omelette is ready to be folded. The heat of the omelette will melt the cheese and you won't have gooey strings of cheese in your cast iron.

Cooking your omelette can go quick so pre-slicing all the vegetables you want to use before you start heating the fat or cooking the eggs is important for timing! If you wash any of your vegetables, make sure you dry them completely before adding them to your omelette.

This recipe makes 1 very large omelette that can easily be split between two people. It's an especially great recipe if you're preparing food for multiple family members at a time, especially little ones! It's a one pan solution that will feed many.

Easy Omelette Breakfast on GAPS

Ingredients for a GAPS Friendly Omelette

  • 1 tbsp Lard or butter

  • 3 Eggs

  • 1 ½ tbsp Water

  • ¼ Red Bell Pepper

  • ¼ Green Bell Pepper

  • ¼ Onion

  • 1 Small Tomato

  • 1 Handful of Spinach

Directions for a GAPS Friendly Omelette

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Chop all vegetables you will add to your meal before you start heating your pan. Try to keep pieces as uniform as possible so they cook quickly.

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Heat your fat in a pan.

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Add spinach to pan and saute until soft.

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Meanwhile, crack three eggs into a dish. Scramble the eggs quickly with a fork.

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Add all other vegetables except tomatoes. Add a few shakes of salt and cook for five minutes.

When your vegetables are soft, add the tomatoes.

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After five minutes, add the eggs. Stir to incorporate the vegetables. Try to leave a little fat on the bottom of the pan, which can be difficult.

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Once your eggs are incorporated, turn the stove to low heat and place a cover over the top of the eggs.

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As your eggs start to harden, help them pull away from the sides of the pan by loosening them with a fork. This helps release some fat which will make it easier to remove the omelette from the pan once it is done.

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When eggs are set, transfer to a plate and fold over. Help loosen the omelette from the pan with a fork.

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Top with what you’d like! I like sour cream on my omelettes but you could add salsa or avocado.

Tip's for a Better Night's Sleep

Sleep. It’s one of our most basic functions as humans. Sleep is essential for our bodies. We And yet, many of us have difficulties in falling asleep or staying asleep for the entire night.

We, like all other animals, need to sleep to survive. Sleep helps us reset mentally but it also helps our bodies physically. During sleep, our cells open to detoxify and our bodies work hard to repair, build, and balance all of the systems inside our body.

If sleep doesn’t come easily to you, changing your bedtime habits can make a difference. You might also find that removing EMFs from around your bedroom helps as well.

Read on for more tips for a better night’s sleep.

Tips for Healthy Sleep Habits

If you have healthy sleep habits, restful sleep will come more easily.

First, wear loose fitting clothing to bed. Wearing tight clothing will restrict your body while you sleep. This restriction will cause your body to tense up and this can impede the amount of relaxation you are able to achieve. Wearing loose fitting clothing is important for all your layers; including the very bottom ones.

Help your body relax by taking a detox bath. Detox baths are a nice way to relax because the warm water soothes our bodies and helps to relax our muscles. This puts us into a meditative state that can help us relax before going to bed. A detox bath is more than simply sitting in warm water. Detox baths are achieved by adding some sort of natural agent to the water which will trigger the detox response inside your body. Possible additions to a bath to turn it into a detox bath are raw apple cider vinegar, baking soda, or epsom salts. To learn more about why we take detox baths and how to take a detox bath, check out my article on detoxing your body with a detox bath.

If you find yourself extremely hungry when you wake up or if your stomach is growling before you try to go to sleep, it’s ok to eat before you go to sleep! A small, light snack will satisfy you just enough for a restful night’s sleep without making you too full to relax. When choosing your pre-bedtime snack, pick some kind of animal fat and something else light. For example, some kind of animal fat and a few apple slices or a few dates with some sour cream.

Electronics and Sleep

For healthy sleep, being mindful of when and where you use electronic devices is important. We are bombarded with electronic devices; nearly everything in our homes can be a smart device. Turn off your electronic devices at least an hour before bed to fall asleep faster and improve the quality of your sleep. Electronic devices like laptops, computers, tablets, phones, and e-readers emit light that is in a blue wave length. This is thought to trick your brain into thinking it is daytime, instead of allowing it to naturally wind down for the night. Turning off these devices an hour before you go to bed will help your brain to start to prepare for sleep.

Electro-magnetic waves can also interfere with a solid night’s sleep. Interference from EMFs can be really damaging to our health but especially during sleep. During sleep, our cells open to detoxify from the day. This can leave them vulnerable, especially to EMF interference. Reduce the EMF exposure in your bedroom to help get a restful night’s sleep.

An electronic device is anything that is plugged in electronically, including tvs, alarm clocks and devices like your cell phone or laptop. These devices should not be plugged in near or under our bed. Ideally, plug them in in another room, or at least on the other side of the room, Make sure there are no cords going under your bed.

Wi-fi can also impact your sleep. Make sure that any wi-fi devices, like your tablet, phone, or laptop are turned off, in airplane mode or in another room. You can also consider turning the wi-fi off in your entire house for the night. You can get a timer that will turn off the wi-fi automatically every night so you don’t even have to think about it.

What has been the most helpful for you to get a great night’s sleep? Share in the comments below!

How to Make the Ultimate Scrambled Eggs

Light, fluffy scrambled eggs are the starter to so many great dishes and an easy addition to any meal. For me, having access to farm fresh eggs means I make scrambled eggs a lot! They're quick for when I'm on the go. It's simple enough to make decent scrambled eggs.

There’s a way to take your scrambled eggs over the top. It transforms them from just ok eggs to the creamiest, dreamiest eggs you've ever had. It’s by playing a little game I like to play called “See how much fat you can get your eggs to absorb.” Hint: scrambled eggs can absorb a LOT of fat!

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You can use the animal fat of your choice in this recipe; I prefer the taste of butter but anything you have on hand will take your scrambled eggs over the top.

Plain old scrambled eggs can be dressed up lots of different ways! You can keep it simple with just salt and pepper, add salsa or sauerkraut or sour cream, or if you have a hankering for something sweet, try a drizzle of honey or date syrup over the top. I find this last one especially helpful if I need a little get up and go in the morning. It’s just enough sugar to kick start my energy levels for the day. If you are able to tolerate grains, you can have a nice piece of sourdough bread on the side.

How do you like your scrambled eggs?

The Best Scrambled Eggs on the GAPS Diet

Ingredients for Scrambled Eggs

  • 4 tbsp Butter or Lard

  • 2 Eggs

Directions for scrambled eggs

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Add your animal fat to a cast iron pan and melt on medium heat. If it doesn’t look like you have enough fat in your pan, feel free to add more!

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Crack two eggs into a bowl or directly into the pan if you're in a hurry and don't mind a little shell that might end up in your eggs.

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Scramble them with a fork or whisk and add them into the melted fat.

Stir quickly to mix the fat and the eggs together.

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Keep stirring, about two or three minutes, until your eggs look set.

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Serve and enjoy!

Northern Colorado GAPS Group Meeting Recap April 30th, 2019

Each week, we gather in Northern Colorado for a meetup centered around the GAPS Diet, started by Dr. Natasha Campbell. During these meetups, we have a lesson about a fundamental aspect of the GAPS Diet, exchange recipes and ideas, support each other through the GAPS Diet, and learn something new from a holistic healthcare speaker or presenter.

The first GAPS Group meeting that you attend is FREE.

If you find the information helpful, individual classes are $15 to attend, or you can buy a punch card for five classes that brings down the cost to $10 per class (recommended). We'll have punch cards for sale when you arrive at Tuesday's meeting.

If you can't make it in-person, we're happy to send you a link for you to watch us LIVE. Send an email to Office@bewellclinic.net to request the link to the broadcast! Costs will still apply to virtual attendance, so we recommend that you come join us to receive all of the benefits of the meeting.

GAPS Group Meeting April 30th, 2019

This week’s presenter was Dr. Carl Malone of The Natural Path.

Dr. Tiffany Wall talked to us about the communication pathways within our bodies, and how stress alone can knock our bodies so far off balance that we get and stay sick.
Then Amy talked about the GAPS protocol and its aims. First and foremost, we want to normalize the fur flora. We also want to heal and seal the gut lining, restore gut function, and restore immunity. The protocol has three parts to it:1: GAPS Diet2: Supplementation3: Detoxing 
She talked in detail about all of them, but the most interesting one was the die-off reaction that results from repopulating our bodies with good bacteria. 

At one point, she said “sometimes your body has to remind you that what you just ate is not food. I know you tried to eat it as food, but it’s not food”

After our Getting Started on GAPS lesson ended, we all stayed to shared GAPS Legal Recipes and hang out. We swapped stories about things we have and haven't tried, talked about our favorite oils, and enjoyed the food! Finding others on the GAPS journey at the same time is a key to your success!

At our meeting, we learned about two soups, a cauliflower rice casserole, and lots and lots of animal fats. You know it's a GAPS meeting because everyone remembers to bring the butter and sour cream!

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Join us at our next GAPS Group Meeting!

Next week's GAPS Group Meeting is the start of a new Getting Started on GAPS Session! Come meet the members of Be Well Clinic's GAPS Group and share your stories.

Our lesson is on Intro GAPS. Amy will share how the stages work and how to nourish the body and heal the gut. We'll talk about how and why all diseases begin in the gut and how you can change your health by healing your gut.

If you feel like you're well-versed on the practical applications of GAPS, you're welcome to skip this part of the meeting and join us at 7:00 PM for our recipe sharing and discussion. This week's we're talking about vegetable ferments!

The Recipe Sharing and Discussion is one of the best things about GAPS Group! You get to try delicious food, and take home the recipe so you can recreate it! It's a great way to diversify your GAPS go-tos, and you get to catch up with everyone on their progress. Sometimes, hearing someone else's success story is the best way to get you to keep going.

Location:
GAPS Group is currently held at the Loveland Outlets, very close to our new office space. It’s located north of McWhinney Blvd. next to The Studio, near Tommy Hilfiger and Sketchers. The best way to get there is to set your GPS to 5613 McWhinney Blvd, Loveland, CO 80538 and walk to suite 5609. Get more details on the exact location here.

See more information and RSVP to the event on our Facebook page.

How to Properly Caramelize Onions

Caramelized onions are an amazing supporting food because they are high in vitamin C, calcium, and quercetin. It’s especially helpful for sore throats but is an excellent food to eat anytime you are starting to feel under the weather! (Check out more of my helpful tips for caring for yourself when you’re sick here.)

I recommend a whole onion per person because the onions will reduce in size. You want to use a lot of animal fat with this recipe! I like both butter or lard, so whatever you happen to have on hand is ok. The fat is also great for you while you’re sick. Make sure you add enough salt for the added minerals, which is also very important when you’re ill.

White or yellow onions work for this recipe. I prefer the yellow onions and often have them on hand so that is what I usually use.

For great caramelized onions, make sure your heat is on low. This is a food that is best with patience - and burnt with impatience. Allow 20 - 30 minutes of cooking time to get really good caramelized onions. You can cook multiple onions at a time as long as you are using a large enough pan. If your entire family is sick, you can make a batch for everyone in about the same amount of time as cooking just one.

When slicing your onions, you want to slice them in short slices. Don’t give into the temptation of dicing your onions! Even if it seems they will cook faster, you’ll most likely end up with a burnt or mushy dish.

Make sure you don’t crowd your pan of onions or they won’t properly caramelize. Above is the maximum amount of onions I would put in one pan.

Caramelized onions should be sweet! They shouldn’t really taste like onions at all when they’re finished! As they cook, take a taster. If it still tastes like onions, keep stirring.

Dr Natasha recommends topping a caramelized onion with a little olive oil and a couple fried eggs. (Again fried in plenty of fat.) This is a very filling meal that’s amazing when you’re sick.

However, you don’t need to be sick to enjoy this nourishing food! It can be very soothing when you’ve had a long day and are needing a comfort food.

Ingredients for Caramelized Onions:

  • 2-3 Tbsp Fat of Your Choice Per Onion

  • Onion (1 Per Person)

  • Salt (The amount of salt will vary if you’re using salted butter or unsalted lard.)

Directions for Caramelized Onions:

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Slice the ends of your onion and peel. Put the peels and “extras” into a bag for use in stock later.

Cut the onion in half. Then cut into half again.

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Slice the onion so long strips form.

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Start your pan heating on medium high and add the fat of your choice. Heating your pan before your onion is sliced will result in a pan that is too hot.

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Add your onions to the pan. Stir to coat in the fat.

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Cook onions over medium heat, stirring every few minutes.

When they are nearing translucency (about 25 ish minutes) add a little salt if you are not using salted butter. Even if you are using salted butter, adding a little extra salt will help them break down.

Make sure everyone salts their onions to taste once the onions are on their plates!

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Your onions are done when they are golden brown. Enjoy them on their own or as part of a larger meal.

How to Make Cabbage Tonic

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. This cabbage tonic can be taken from the beginning of the Intro Diet of GAPS. Use this tonic daily to help change your gut flora. As with all probiotic foods, make sure you begin with only a small amount, about a tablespoon at a time, keeping an eye out for symptoms of die off. If none are present, you can continue gradually increasing your daily amount and the frequency that you consume this tonic throughout the day.

Fermented cabbage is very high in vitamin C which is essential for healing a leaky gut. This cabbage tonic can be taken from the beginning of the Intro Diet of GAPS. Use this tonic daily to help change your gut flora. As with all probiotic foods, make sure you begin with only a small amount, about a tablespoon at a time, keeping an eye out for symptoms of die off. If none are present, you can continue gradually increasing your daily amount and the frequency that you consume this tonic throughout the day.

When you do ferments, your intention and energy really does affect the taste of the ferments. If you’re stressed, it will show in the food. Do ferments at a time that you’re relaxed and enjoying being in the kitchen. If this is not your mindset, take a couple minutes to reset, thinking about how this work is bringing such amazing health and healing to your body and your family. After your mindset is set, smile and preparing your ferment!

When doing ferments, it is important to hand wash your jars. A lot of dishwashers leave a film of soap, even if you’re using a natural soap. Make sure you rinse your jar well with hot water. It’s not necessary to sterilize your jar; we’re not canning. Fermentation creates a live food that will take care of the bad bacteria.

Tidbit from Nourishing Traditions: “Add ¼ - ½ tsp cayenne pepper to 4 ounces of cabbage tonic for a gargle and sore throat remedy.

This recipe is based on the Nourishing Traditions cookbook by Sally Fallon on page 614.

Ingredients for Cabbage Tonic:

  • ¼ Organic Green Cabbage

  • 1 tsp Sea Salt

  • ¼ Cup Whey

  • Filtered Water

Directions for Cabbage Tonic:

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Shred cabbage finely with a knife. You want small even pieces so it ferments evenly. (Similar to cutting onions for even cooking.)

Add cabbage and salt to a bowl.

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Using your hands, squish the cabbage for about a minute.

Let the cabbage sit for five minutes.

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Squish the cabbage again for a minute.

Put cabbage in a 2 quart jar with whey.

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Add enough water to fill the container.

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Cover tightly.

Leave at room temperature for 2 days before transferring to the fridge.

How to Properly Soak Oatmeal

Oatmeal can be a good alternative to eggs as a breakfast in the morning, when eaten with plenty of fat like butter. There’s nothing wrong with eating oats, properly prepared, as long as your gut can handle it.

Oats are not part of the GAPS Diet but once you graduate to the well diet recommendations of the Weston A Price Foundation, this is a great breakfast for a cold morning.

I like to add raisins, butter, and a little sweetener, either honey, maple syrup, or date syrup, to my oatmeal.

Properly prepared oatmeal includes soaking it overnight. When you do this, it becomes a quick breakfast food to make in the morning.

You can be dairy free and still eat oatmeal! You can use lemon juice or vinegar in place of whey. If you can tolerate whey, this is the preferred way to consume oatmeal.

Your oats don’t need to be steel cut but you want whole oats. Steel cut or whole rolled oats are fine for this recipe but not quick oats. Quick oats are not whole; they are processed to cook more quickly and have often have preservatives on them.

This is based off the recipe in the Nourishing Traditions book by Sally Fallon.

Ingredients for Nourishing Traditions Oatmeal:

  • 1 1/2 Cups Warm Filtered Water

  • 1 Cup Gluten Free, GMO Free Oats

  • 4 tbsp Whey, Yogurt, Kefir, Buttermilk, Vinegar or Lemon Juice

  • 1 tsp sea salt

Directions for Nourishing Traditions Oatmeal:

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Add oats, whey, warm water and sea salt to a bowl.

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Stir to combine.

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Cover and leave on your kitchen counter overnight or for 8 to 12 hours.

All About Fruits and Vegetables

Sweet fruits! Is there anything better than a juicy peach on a summer’s day or a bright red strawberry, straight from the garden and bursting with tart flavor? And vegetables! Their cooling crunch, the endless ways to season them up and add them to everything.

Plants like fruits and vegetables cleanse our bodies. They help our bodies to process and remove the toxins that we are exposed to on a daily basis from the environment around us, even if we do our best to avoid toxins. We mostly benefit from the fiber, antioxidants, enzymes, and other detoxifying substances.

Drinking fresh juices made up of both fruits and vegetables is one of the easiest ways to enjoy the rich nutritional benefits of produce. Adding fruit into juices will especially help children in getting all the benefits that juicing can offer.

Fruits, nuts, and other treats should be limited, even on Full GAPS. So treat yourself to an occasional piece of fruit but don’t overdo it! To see a full list of fruits and vegetables that are acceptable on the GAPS Diet, click here.

Good Fruits and Vegetables: The Clean 15 and the Dirty Dozen

If you’re on a strict food budget or looking for a small change that can have a large impact, try purchasing “The Clean 15.” A non-profit group called the Environmental Working Group conducts ongoing research about pesticides that are in (and on) our food and creates a guide to produce pesticides, which they update every year. They rank 48 popular fruits and vegetables, with the “Clean 15” being the top fifteen fruits and vegetables with the least amount of pesticides.

For fruits in 2019, the “Clean 15” which you can purchase the non-organic versions are:

  • Avocados

  • Pineapples

  • Papayas

  • Kiwi

  • Cantaloupe

  • Honeydew Melons

For vegetables in 2019, the "Clean 15" which you can purchase the non-organic versions are:

  • Sweet Corn

  • Sweet Peas

  • Onions

  • Eggplants

  • Asparagus

  • Cabbage

  • Cauliflower

  • Broccoli

  • Mushrooms

A note on Genetically Engineered seeds: The Environmental Working Group has said that a small amount of papaya, sweet corn, and summer squash sold in the U.S. is produced from Genetically Engineered seeds. To avoid Genetically Engineered produce, buy papayas organic.

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Conversely, the “Dirty Dozen” are fruits that you really want to purchase organically. These are the top twelve fruits and vegetables that contain pesticides so to keep yourself toxin free, it’s important to purchase organic.

For fruits in 2019, the “Dirty Dozen” that should be purchased organically are:

  • Strawberries

  • Nectarines

  • Apples

  • Grapes

  • Peaches

  • Cherries

  • Pears

For vegetables in 2019, the "Dirty Dozen" that should be purchased organically are:

  • Spinach

  • Kale

  • Tomatoes

  • Celery

  • Potatoes

  • Hot Peppers

Better Fruits and Vegetables: Purchasing High Quality Organic Always

Organic means produce is grown without synthetic pesticides, synthetic fertilizers or genetically modified organisms.  Purchasing all of your fruits and vegetables organically is beneficial for you and beneficial for the plant! If you’re looking for the better choice in produce, try purchasing high quality organic fruits and vegetables.

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Best Fruits and Vegetables: Eating Local and in Season

The best choice when it comes to choosing fruits and vegetables is to eat local and in season fruit. Eating in season means your food is fresher and better tasting! Eating local is also better for the environment because your food travels less miles to be on your table.

To buy local, in season fruits and vegetables, you can check for local farming co-ops or farmer’s markets. Buying local also means you’re supporting a small business. It’s a win-win-win all around! Or consider growing your own fruits and vegetables if you have the space!

To find in-season fruits and vegetables no matter where you are, try the Seasonal Food Guide website.

The Best Way to Add Fermented Food to Your Diet

Fermenting - one of the best things I discovered on my journey of healing!

The process of preserving food by fermenting it is something that’s been around for centuries and is practiced all other world. It’s not just the process of creating alcoholic beverages like beer or wine, or creating different types of dairy like cheese or yogurt.  Eating fermented foods is a huge part of the GAPS Diet, but anyone who adds fermented foods to their diet will see some benefit.

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There’s so many benefits to fermenting!  Fermenting food means you’re helping beneficial bacteria and yeast grow that aid in digestion. Fermented foods are packed full of probiotics, which helps your gut health. It also boosts immunity by producing lactic acid, which pathogenic bacteria cannot live in the presence of. It allows you to preserve food longer which means that you’re throwing less away! It also increases the nutritional availability without adding anything extra.

While any type of ferment that you consume is beneficial, there are good, better, and best ways to ferment.

Good: Buying a Ferment at the Store

There are a variety of common ferments that are available at most grocery stores. Starting small and adding just one ferment to your diet will bring some benefit to your gut health and overall wellbeing.

While purchasing a ferment from a store isn’t the most beneficial for your wallet or your health, if you want to dip your toes into fermented foods, purchasing one can be just fine. Find one that has the least amount of ingredients possible and has the least amount of processing. Fermented foods should be as close to the source as they can be.

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Better: Buying Multiple Ferments at the Store

There are many kinds of fermented foods so experiment! Adding a variety of ferments to your diet is important because you and your gut will get a much wider variety of bacteria, all naturally. Fermented foods come in many different varieties, like pickled vegetables, sauerkraut, or even liquids like kombucha and kefir.

A better option for getting ferments into your diet is to purchase a variety of high quality ferments from the store.

Best: Making and Consuming Your Own Variety of Ferments

Making your own ferments is absolutely the best! I love making my own ferments because I can buy large quantities of food in season and locally and preserve it for a long time. I also know what I’m eating because I added it myself!

Consuming a variety of different kinds of ferments is important for our gut health. By making your own, you can save a lot of money and get all the variety you need!

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When you make your own ferments, you’re intimately connected with what you’re eating. This is important for thoughtful eating.

If you’re interested in fermenting your own food, I’ve shared a lot about fermenting over the years! You can see more on the process of fermenting here and here, and specifically about lacto-fermenting here. Whey is a great way (get it!) to start the fermentation process for many ferments. You can learn about making your own whey here.

For recipes on fermenting food, check out my beet kvass recipe, my recipe for fermented garlic (learn more about the benefits of fermented garlic) or learn how to ferment almond flour for baking.

How to Ferment Almond Flour

Fermenting Almond Flour for Proper Digestion

Any seed wants to be a plant. Seeds include nuts, seeds, beans, and grains. To protect itself, a seed has phytic acid and other enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. These substances attack the body of the animal that ate the seed, preventing the digestion of the seed. This is why we see whole seeds in bird poop.

Manually grinding seeds into flours does nothing to negate these enzyme inhibitors and anti-nutrients. We may not necessarily see whole seeds in our stools but we don’t need to for our bodies to experience the effects of these substances. Inflammation, poor absorption of foods, and leaky gut are some of the effects on our bodies of eating seeds that are not properly prepared. To learn more about properly preparing grains, check out my video.

How to Prepare Grains Properly

When we properly prepare our grains however, we begin the germination process, which changes the seeds chemical structure. It neutralizes the anti-nutrients and enzyme inhibitors, and the seed prepares to bring life. When we eat a seed in this state, it’s nutrients are available to us and it brings life to our bodies.  

All seeds can be prepared in three ways - soaking, sprouting or fermenting. Fermenting is by far the most simple and the most beneficial. All it requires is whey. These directions are for almond flour but you can use the same concept to any nut, seed, or grain. For specific instructions on how to do this with whole seeds, see my recipe on trail mix.

The other benefit of using fermented almond flour is that it makes a much lighter end product. The fermentation process acts somewhat like a baking soda or powder, increasing the air space as your treat bakes, making it less dense.

Preparing fermented almond flour is quite easy. After letting it ferment for 24 hours, this base can be kept in the fridge for about a week. If you have a family that loves sweet treats, this is a food that you can keep on hand at all times to create a quick twenty minute cookie. Fermented almond flour is a great base for many baked goods.

Ingredients for Fermented Almond Flour:

  • 2 Cups Almond Flour

  • 1/4 Cup Whey

Directions for Fermented Almond Flour

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Add almond flour to a glass bowl.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Pour whey over almond flour.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Stir to moisten. Add additional whey if needed. Flour should be moist and crumbly but not wet.

Fermented almond flour makes for a much lighter baked good. The fermentation process acts like a baking soda, increasing air as your treat bakes. Fermenting almond flour is quite easy; it just needs to be done 24 hours before you bake. How to Ferment Almond Flour by GAPS Certified Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Cover and leave for 24 hours to properly ferment. During this time, your fermenting almond flour can be left with other jar ferments because it is covered.

The Best Cookware for Your Kitchen

Good, Better, Best: Cookware Options

Cookware is an essential part of a kitchen. It’s what we use daily to prepare our meals so of course we want it to be long lasting and healthy for our families and loved ones we are lovingly and carefully preparing food for! Selecting the right cookware is important. Not only will well made cookware last longer, meaning it’s a better investment, but the wrong cookware can actually do more harm than good for your family by leaking toxins and chemicals into the food you consume. There are good, better, and best options when it comes to cooking. What type you choose is largely determined by what you’ll be cooking.

Best Cookware Options

If you’re baking or roasting…

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Properly seasoned stoneware and glass are the best cookware options when you are baking. Glass bakeware is great for baking casseroles in or roasting vegetables. I cover any vegetable in fat (lard is my personal favorite for roasting) whether it’s covered or uncovered! I love my casserole dish that has a great glass lid with it. However, if you have a dish that doesn’t have a lid, you can also use a layer of parchment paper with a layer of aluminum foil over the top as the lid.

Seasoned stoneware is my favorite for baking cookies and pizzas. A well seasoned stoneware piece can make a huge difference between a mushy or crips cauliflower pizza crust! If you are using stoneware, be aware that it might change your cooking time. I find it’s best to heat the stoneware up in the oven while the oven preheats. Then, while the food is cooking, I keep a close eye on it as it’s getting towards the end of it’s prescribed cooking time. It will probably cook a few minutes less.

If you’re boiling…

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A stainless steel pot with a thick base and more metal on the bottom is the best option when you need to boil or steam on the stove. You can tell it’s a good stainless steel pot because it’s heavier! Having a thick metal base on the bottom helps with heat distribution so your food doesn’t scorch on the bottom of your pan. A great bonus is this makes for easy clean up too!

If you’re frying or reheating…

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A properly seasoned cast iron pan is the workhorse of the kitchen! I use my cast iron to reheat most of my food since I do not use a microwave. I also use it to fry up my eggs and bacon in the morning, or cook a quick stirfry. It’s good for just about anything! If you have a problem with food sticking to your cast iron, it’s because you’re not heating it properly before adding your food or you’re not adding enough fat while you’re cooking. Use a lot of fat and nothing will stick! Seasoning your cast iron properly is easy. Just leave fat in it all the time! If you ever need to wash it out with water, immediately add more fat back to the pan.

Better Cookware Options

If you’re baking…

Aluminum baking trays that are lined with parchment paper are ok if you don’t have stoneware. Make sure you put the barrier of the parchment paper between your cookware and the food. Aluminum should never touch your food. The same thing goes for lining aluminum muffin trays.

If you’re boiling…

If you can’t find a stainless steel pot with a thick base, using a stainless steel pot without a thick base and with no coating on it is ok. If you know that your pots or pans are lead free, they can be used in your daily cooking as well.

Good Cookware Options

Using a ceramic pot or pan that has nonstick coating on it is better than a traditional non-stick coating. Keep in mind the smallest scratches on this you won’t be able to see. If you see the coating come off as you are washing the pan or cooking with it, it’s time to get rid of the pan! This is certainly not my preference in cooking but is better than traditional non-stick coating and will do in a pinch.

I do not recommend aluminum pots and pans, as you never want aluminum touching your food. Any pots or pans with traditional non-stick coating, plastic silicone baking trays and silicone bakeware are also not recommended.

What’s your favorite pot or pan in your kitchen? Do you have a go-to?

Making Whey

Easy Do-It-Yourself Whey from Yogurt

Whey is the other protein in milk aside from casein. It’s only present after milk products have been cultured and it’s a live food. This liquid is teeming with good lactic acid producing bacteria (LABs.) Whey is a basic to keep on hand because it can be used to ferment flours, seeds, nuts, vegetables, or as a starter to culture other dairy.

I use homemade yogurt to make my whey but you can use store bought yogurt to make your own whey. Make sure you get a full fat, grass fed yogurt that only contains milk and cultures. It’s ok if it’s pasteurized as the culturing process adds life back to this food! Greek yogurt will not work to make whey as there is very little whey naturally in that strain of yogurt. If you are sensitive to lactose or casein, you should leave your store bought yogurt out on the counter, unopened, for an additional 12 - 24 hours to finish culturing the yogurt before you strain the whey. (Essentially making it lactose free.)

If you strain your yogurt for a long time, it becomes almost like a cream cheese substance. It’s great to add fresh herbs to and make a dip!

To speed along the straining time, stir your yogurt well before adding it to the cloth.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

I really like using the villi life culture from the Heirloom Yogurt Starter pack at Cultures for Health. Not only is it a mesophilic culture, meaning it cultures at room temperature instead of at 110 degrees like most yogurts, but it is a runnier yogurt and produces a lot of whey for my baking and fermenting needs.

I enjoy to the runniness of the ville life culture. If you don’t, simply separate some of the whey out of each batch for a thicker end product.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

The cloth I used is the single fold diaper cloth, you can purchase it at Walmart or find something similar at Cultures for Health.

It’s best to use a plastic funnel because metal can be damaging to the good bacteria inside the whey.

Whey keeps in the fridge for about six months if you’ve successfully removed most of the milk solids and strained well.

Ingredients for DIY Whey

  • 3 Cups Homemade Yogurt

Directions for DIY Whey

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Set a plastic strainer inside a large measuring cup or bowl.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Fold the cloth four times and set inside the strainer.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Pour your yogurt into the cloth.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Gather the edges of your cloth and secure with a rubber band.

Leave to sit and strain for as long as desired.

If you want to simply thicken your yogurt, leaving it for only ten minutes is fine. If you’d like to strain all the whey out to make a cream cheese, you can leave it for much longer. I often leave mine out overnight.

It is easy to make your own whey using yogurt, either homemade yogurt or store bought yogurt. Whey is used for many things like fermentation. DIY recipe on how to make whey by Northern Colorado Holistic Healthcare Provider and Certified GAPS Practitioner Amy Mihaly.

Once you have strained enough whey out, pour it into a clean glass jar.

Rinse your cloth well in hot water. Don’t use soap! Hang to dry.

Use your whey to ferment flours, seeds, nuts, or vegetables, or as a starter to culture other dairy. What will you use your whey for?